The Hastings Center Report

The Hastings Center Report is a bimonthly magazine addressing ethical issues in medicine and the life sciences for an audience of physicians and other health care practitioners, attorneys and professionals in business and academia. Founded in Feb. of 1971, The Hastings Center publishes this magazine. Subjects for the Hastings Center Report are medicine and surgery. The Managing Editor is Joyce Griffin. Gregory E. Kaebnick is the Editor.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 4, July-August

A Government of Limited Powers
Roscoe C. Filburn owned a small farm in Ohio where he raised poultry, dairy cows, and a modest acreage of winter wheat. Some wheat he fed his animals, some he sold, and some he kept for his family's daily bread. The Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1938...
Alternative Sources of Stem Cells
Embryonic stem cell research pits the promise of curing devastating diseases and saving lives against the destruction of human life at its earliest stages. To circumvent this moral dilemma, the President's Council on Bioethics recently published a...
Before He Wakes
Professor C, 85, is a retired English professor. He never married and now has few interests besides classical music and his beloved cat, Tosca. He has a friend in the English Department, Professor E, who visits at least once a week to make sure that...
Bioethics Matures: The Field Faces the Future
Modern bioethics is now approaching the forty-year mark, and bioethics centers and programs have proliferated in universities around the country. Yet as these programs are becoming more established, seeking to tenure their faculty, to graduate students,...
Creating Fido's Twin: Can Pet Cloning Be Ethically Justified?
Commercial pet cloning--currently cats only--is now available from the firm Genetic Savings and Clone for the small price of $30,000. In December 2004, a nine-week-old cat clone was delivered to its owner, the first of six customers waiting for the...
Doctors of Interrogation
"We are busy with a little interrogation here. But our friend is taking some strain. He says he can't breathe properly. Could you just take a look at him?... [I]s he faking it?... In your opinion, as a doctor, how much more can he take?" --DAMON...
Genetic Exceptionalism & Legislative Pragmatism: Can Passing Antidiscrimination Laws Ever Be a Bad Idea? Yes, If Broad Policy Reform Is Abandoned in Favor of Genetic-Specific Legislation. but in Spite of Its Serious Flaws, Both in Concept and in Practice, Genetic-Specific Legislation Is Sometimes Worth Passing Anyway
One of the most important and contentious policy issues surrounding genetics is whether genetic information should be treated separately from other medical information. The view that genetics raises distinct issues is what Thomas Murray labeled "genetic...
How Not to Think about Genetic Information
Mark Rothstein directs our attention to policy-makers' fondness for enacting specifically genetic legislation, even in the absence of any good reason to think that genetic information is morally special--a belief known as "genetic exceptionalism."...
In Memoriam: Marc Lappe
Marc Lappe, a former associate on the staff of the Center, died of a brain tumor in May. I hired him in 1971 as our second associate (Robert M. Veatch was the first). In those days, the staff of the Center was only six people, but we were full of enthusiasm...
Making Policy
Those who think about ethical issues in medicine and medical science have taken to asking, increasingly frequently, what it takes to make a real social difference on these matters, and whether the usual ways of thinking about them are enough. The lead...
Not at Peace
Mr. G was a hospice patient. I'm Friday evening. Dr. Gupta, Mr. G's physician, was out of town for the weekend, and I was covering. I was supposed to be meeting friends for dinner but had received a page that afternoon. Elsa, the unit clerk, usually...
Patients, Patents, Profits
In March, the Hastings Center and the Center for Religious Inquiry at St. Bartholomew's in mid-town Manhattan co-sponsored a seminar titled "Vioxx, Celebrex, and Aleve: Patients, Patents, Profits, and the Public Interest." The seminar explored the...
Realbioethik
Back in the late 1990s, when cloning was about Dolly and not about stem cells, I had the privilege of attending an ancillary meeting of the International Association for Bioethics annual conference. Representatives of national bioethics commissions...
Realizing Bioethics' Goals in Practice: Ten Ways "Is" Can Help "Ought"
Bioethics has been criticized for lacking relevance and for being naive. Its principles and modes of justification are better suited to handling clinical matters at the bedside or policy issues related to new technologies than for grappling with arguably...
The Afterlife of Terri Schiavo
Shortly after Terri Schiavo's autopsy was released, Not Dead Yet, a disability advocacy group, issued a press release asserting that the autopsy results "leave the central issues in her life and death unanswered." Not Dead Yet contested the view that...
The Risks of Race in Addressing Health Disparities
There are undeniable differences among population groups in the incidence, prevalence, mortality, and social burden of serious diseases. However, some ways of representing the problem of health disparities may have unintended and unfortunate consequences....
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