Journal of Economic Issues

Founded in 1967, the Journal of Economic Issues is a quarterly journal that publishes articles on economic methodology, economic control and policy problems. It also contains book reviews and proceedings of annual meetings conducted by the Association of Evolutionary Economics, its publisher.It is edited by Richard V. Adkisson.

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 4, December

A Note on Money and the Circuit Approach
In a recent issue of this journal, Louis-Philippe Rochon (1999) compares three distinct approaches to money creation--the neoclassical view, the Post Keynesian view, and the circuit approach. Through this juxtaposition Rochon aims to clarify the economic...
Can a Rising Tide Raise All Boats? Evidence from the Clinton-Era Expansion
The Clinton-era expansion is now the oldest on record and while economic growth has not been unprecedented it has been robust. Perhaps most importantly, the expansion seems to have successfully moved the economy toward fuller, if not full, employment....
Competing Perspectives on the Liberalization of China's Foreign Trade and Investment Regime
China has been experiencing a social and economic transformation that is no less dramatic than those experienced since 1989 by the nations of central and eastern Europe. In a span of twenty years, this once "sleeping giant" has evolved from a centrally...
Conflict and Conversion: Henry S. Dennison and the Shaping of J.K. Galbraith's Economic Thought
A sizable amount of attention in the history of economic thought has been devoted to unraveling the unique contributions of John Kenneth Galbraith. Not nearly as much the subject of contention as is Thorstein Veblen--the intellectual figure with whom...
Corporate Power and the Evolution of Consumer Credit
The evolution of consumer credit involves the use of corporate power to remove the liquidity constraints that historically have limited consumer spending. Lack of liquidity constrains consumer spending, hindering the ability of corporations to transform...
Descendance and Social Genealogies: Toward an Evolutionary Conception of Economic History
In 1898 Thorstein Veblen published his programmatic article "Why is Economics Not an Evolutionary Science?" in which he attacked the proponents of(neo-)classical economics as being "helplessly behind the times" (56). As he put it, these economists...
In Memory
HAROLD GOODHUE VATTER, PHD 1910-2000 Harold Goodhue Vatter, professor emeritus in the Portland State University Department of Economics, died the night of September 8 in his Portland home. Born in 1910, he was just three months shy of his ninetieth...
Institutions and Culture: Neo-Weberian Economic Anthropology
After a long moribund period, economic anthropology is undergoing a renaissance. There has been a notable resurgence in the study of consumption (Miller 1994, 1995, 1997), globalization (Appadurai 1996; Friedman 1995), neo-Marxist political economy...
Ocean Container Shipping: Impacts of a Technological Improvement
Through the 1950s, ocean transport of general (dry non-bulk) cargo used break-bulk (i.e., on pallet) methods: pallets were moved, generally one at a time, onto a truck or rail car that carried them from the factory or warehouse to the docks. There...
The Creation and Circulation of Endogenous Money: A Reply to Pressman
Steven Pressman has written an informative and thought-provoking response to my article (Rochon 1999a). In his reply, Pressman proposes four arguments, which he claims are problematic for the circuit approach. First, he argues that in the circuit approach,...
The Political Economy of Social Security Reform Proposals
Various interest groups and the executive branch of the US government have proposed fundamental changes in the structure of the US Social Security system. Most of these reform proposals have entailed some form of privatization of the system. The term...
Work Time Regimes in Europe: Can Flexibility and Gender Equity Coexist?
The regulation of working hours through legislation and collective bargaining became standard practice throughout Europe during the postwar period. This led to a stable workweek, generally forty hours or slightly higher. Yet many of the seemingly stable...