The Journal of Rehabilitation

A quarterly, peer-reviewed journal published by the National Rehabilitation Association. Articles include original research, academic criticism, and expert debate in the field of rehabilitation.

Articles from Vol. 70, No. 1, January-March

Attitudes regarding Interpersonal Relationships with Persons with Mental Illness and Mental Retardation
Historically, persons with disabilities have been confronted with not only the physical and mental impediments of their disability, but also with the accompanying social stigma and negative social attitudes. A persistent negative attitude and social...
Augmentative Communication Employment Training and Supports (ACETS): Some Employment-Related Outcomes
Recent advances in technology, clinical/educational practices, and public policies, as well as changes in economic and workforce demographics, should be expanding employment opportunities for people with disabilities, including those who have significant...
Disability Rights: Attitudes of Private and Public Sector Representatives
Enacted in 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has been hailed as the most significant civil rights law for individuals with disabilities. This legislation was passed following increased political pressure from disability advocates with...
Do You Have a Disability? A Population-Based Test of Acceptance, Denial, and Adjustment among Adults with Disabilities in the U.S
Acceptance and denial are often conceptualized as mutually exclusive responses to one's disability status. In the literature on psychosocial adjustment, denial is typically seen as an interim coping stage, adopted by the individual until he or she...
Editor's Comment
In our second issue as editors of the Journal of Rehabilitation we would like to take an opportunity to discuss several changes that will be made to the Journal. The changes are designed to strengthen the professional image of the Journal, improve...
Medical, Pyschological, Social, and Programmatic Barriers to Employment for People with Multiple Sclerosis
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, often disabling disease of the central nervous system and is the most common cause of chronic neurological disability in young adults, affecting between 250,000 and 350,000 people living in the U.S. With an average...
Merging Cultural Differences and Professional Identities: Strategies for Maximizing Collaborative Efforts during the Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act
Significant policy changes focused on improving employment outcomes for persons with disabilities have included the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) 1990, amendments to the Rehabilitation Act in 1992 and 1998, the formation of the Presidential...
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