The Oral History Review

A semiannual journal of the preservation of the oral record of human experience.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 2, Summer-Fall

Commentary
Catherine Fosl's account of writing Anne Braden's biography while she was alive is important for helping us understand the complex "dialogue" which can occur when a subject, in some fundamental way, is ambivalent about having her life recorded and...
Editor's Introduction
As I assume editorship of the Oral History Review, I do so knowing that I stand upon the shoulders of many. This particular issue is the product of outgoing OHR editor Andrew J. Dunar's and my collaboration. It is difficult to put into words the...
Finding Our Place: Reconstructing Community through Oral History
Abstract "Finding Our Place: Reconstructing Community through Oral History," analyzes how oral histories not only give new meaning to places, but play a significant role in locating sites specific in the development of the Spanish-language music industry....
From Farm to Factory: Transitions in Work, Gender, and Leisure at Banning Mill, 1910-1930s
Abstract This study explores new and traditional forms of leisure enjoyed by white southern rural millhands at Banning Mill between 1910 and the 1930s. As they moved from farm to factory, millhands experienced unfamiliar working conditions, changes...
Recovering a "Lost" Story Using Oral History: The United States Supreme Court's Historic Green V. New Kent County, Virginia, Decision
Abstract In 1965, New Kent County, located just east of Richmond, Virginia, became the setting for the one of the most important school desegregation cases since Brown v. Board of Education. Ten years after the U.S. Supreme Court declared "separate...
Response to Commentary
I appreciate very much the spirit of Paul Mishler's comments on my reflections about my biography of Anne Braden. The focus of Dr. Mishler's research is quite different from mine, and I value his insights into the personal and cultural dynamics of...
"The Civil Rights Movement of the 1990s?": The Anti-Abortion Movement and the Struggle for Racial Justice
Abstract In 1964, Claude and Jeanne Nolen, who were white, joined an interracial NAACP team intent on desegregating local restaurants in Austin, Texas as a test of the recently passed Civil Rights Act. Twenty-five years later, the Nolens pleaded "no...