Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 93, No. 6, March

A Dream Deferred
Ten years later, the signing ceremony of the No Child Left Behind Act seems like a fantasy: President George W. Bush seated at a quaint wooden desk in the gymnasium of Hamilton High School in Ohio in early 2002, with liberal lawmakers Ted Kennedy and...
A New Script for Working with Parents: Teacher Candidates Develop Skills for Collaborating with Parents of Students with Disabilities
In the scripts of many celebrated Hollywood films portraying the struggles and triumphs of students with disabilities, a common subplot often emerges: conflict between educators (or other professionals) and the families they're attempting to serve....
A Smart ALEC Threatens Public Education: Coordinated Efforts to Introduce Model Legislation Aimed at Defunding and Dismantling Public Schools Is the Signature Work of This Conservative Organization
Alegislative contagion seemed to sweep across the Midwest during the early months of 2011. First, Wisconsin legislators wanted to strip public employees of the right to bargain. Then, Indiana legislators got into the act. Then, it was Ohio. In each...
A University Joins the Community: Universities, Schools, and Communities Can Collaborate to Ensure That Children Living in Low-Income Communities Have the Supports They Need to Be Successful in School
Ten-four good buddy! Truckers across the country know this usually happy sound that conveys a sense of community and collegiality. For us, ten-four-ten (10-4-10) was opening day for the University-Assisted Community School (UACS) after-school program,...
Before You Hit on Me Again, Let's Talk: We've Got Trust Issues from Being Burned before, but That Doesn't Mean We Want to Clap Erasers and Calculate Grades by Hand
Dear educational technology, These days, we run into you everywhere. People who say you're just what we need have gone out of their way to introduce you and are quick to criticize us for not showing more interest. So, why aren't we more into you?...
Does Your School Build on Strengths?
On the first day of school, little Br'er Rabbit combed his ears, and he went hopping off to his running class. There he was a star. He ran to the top of the hill and back as fast as he could go, and, oh, did it feel good. He said to himself, "I can't...
Double-Dipping for Course Credit: Are Dual-Credit Courses Living Up to the Hype That They Will Help Prepare Students for College, Reduce College Costs, and Make U.S. Students More Competitive?
Programs that let high school students attend college classes have been around for 25 years and frequently are considered among the solutions to raising college graduation rates, adding rigor to high school curricula, and taking a chunk out of college...
Educational Opportunity Is Achievable and Affordable
Raising academic standards while eliminating achievement gaps between advantaged and disadvantaged students are America's primary national educational goals. This pursuit of equity and excellence reflects a bipartisan consensus of presidents, governors,...
Evaluating Teacher Evaluation: Popular Modes of Evaluating Teachers Are Fraught with Inaccuracies and Inconsistencies, but the Field Has Identified Better Approaches
Practitioners, researchers, and policy makers agree that most current teacher evaluation systems do little to help teachers improve or to support personnel decision making. There's also a growing consensus that evidence of teacher contributions to...
Knowing Good from Bad
Becky Smith remains the worst teacher I have ever personally observed. Even with me sitting in her 4th-grade classroom, she yelled, she screamed at students. She taught from her desk. She left her desk only to walk students down the hall for a les-son...
Listen First, Then Teach: Laying a Foundation of Respect in Classrooms Will Enable Teachers to Learn from Students Even as the Students Learn from Teachers
My father liked to ask riddles. One of them had a significant consequence for my professional career. In the early 1970s, the University of California funded graduate students in mathematics to teach in underprivileged schools using a guided discovery...
McMickens Honored for Dissertation
Tryan L. McMickens, a visiting assistant professor at Suffolk University in Boston, has been awarded the 2011- 12 PDK International Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award. His dissertation examines how historically black colleges and universities...
Refocus Professional Development
"What teachers need to improve their craft is rarely what they receive from professional development." -- Yvette Jackson, former director of professional development, New York City Department of Education If we simplified professional development...
Research and Practice: Using What We Know
Over the last few years, interest in using research to support good policy and practice has grown significantly. The appetite for reliable and practical research findings has never been higher as most educators and many governments now see research...
Rightsizing a School District: A Dramatic Self-Examination Led the Kansas City, Mo., Public Schools to Close Schools and Cut $68 Million from Its Annual Budget
The transformation of the Kansas City, Mo., School District (KCMSD) has been long overdue. Multiple superintendents and administrations, using billions of dollars of desegregation funds, tried to transform the district by creating magnet schools, themed...
Super Teachers: Superintendents Must Be Strong Leaders, Operations Experts, and Budget Gurus. but, Most Importantly, Superintendents Must Be Good Teachers
"Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that frightens us most. We ask ourselves, 'Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, and famous?' Actually,...
Teaching Students Not to Sweat the Test: Teachers Can Change Some of Their Practices to Ensure That Students Don't Feel Extreme Anxiety at Exam Time
Every student takes tests, whether they're in 1st grade or graduate school. Many of those students will experience some degree of test anxiety, which can negatively affect their grades, promotions, graduation, and post-secondary opportunities (Salend,...
The Elephant in the Classroom: Sanitizing Literature for Classroom Instruction Doesn't Help Students Learn the Lessons about Life and Themselves That the Texts Expose Them To
For high school teachers, these are enigmatic times. We want to prepare students for life in the real world, and yet we balk at teaching them the truth of that world. The recent publication of a corrected Huckleberry Finn has touched a nerve. We no...
Triggering Reform at Public Schools: Proponents of Parent Trigger Laws Must Find Ways to Promote Stability in the Aftermath of a Successful Petition If They Are to Avoid the Recurrence of Policy Churn, Inefficiency, and Persistently Troubled Schools
An intriguing experiment in direct democracy is afoot in some of the nation's struggling public schools. Under new "parent trigger" laws passed in California and on the agenda in New York, Ohio, Colorado, and Chicago, parents of children in chronically...
Up-and-Coming Leader: Crystal Jensen
Often, Native American women become leaders to fill a need in the community. "That's definitely how I've evolved, without realizing it, to use technology to empower communities," said Crystal Jensen, a registered member of the Choctaw tribe. These...
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