Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 88, No. 6, February

Beyond PowerPoint
WITHOUT a doubt, the program that has harassed me the most over time is PowerPoint. Sometimes I think Bill Gates has it in for Mac users. (Even if you are a PC user, read on; you might like the information in the last half of the column.) There have...
Confluence Is a Cure: A Reply to 'Edison Is the Symptom, NCLB Is the Disease'
Mr. Chubb challenges Mr. Campbell's impressions of Confluence Academy. He suggests that Mr. Campbell didn't spend enough time in the school to gain an accurate picture, and he refutes the specific charges leveled against Confluence and the Edison Schools...
Conspiracy Theory: Lessons for Leaders from Two Centuries of School Reform
If school leaders are to bring about successful reform, they must thwart the forces that have conspired against it since the 19th century. Mr. Nehring identifies six "conspirators"--destructive tendencies so deeply embedded in our culture that they...
Edison Is the Symptom, NCLB Is the Disease
Engaging students requires giving them a say in what they learn and how they will learn it. Mr. Campbell warns that this can't happen in the strictly disciplined, rule-bound schools with test-driven curricula that are the logical response to our current...
Enrichment Activities for Elementary Art
A DAILY challenge facing elementary art teachers is how to productively redirect students who consistently finish their projects early. The websites below all offer highly interactive art games and activities. These interactive features provide enjoyable...
Growing Hope as a Determinant of School Effectiveness
The EdVisions model of secondary schools grew out of the belief that there must be a better match between the educational environment and the core needs of adolescents. Mr. Newell and Mr. Van Ryzin present convincing evidence that focusing on these...
High Stakes for Edison: A Rejoinder to John Chubb
In this rejoinder to Mr. Chubb, Mr. Campbell argues that Edison offers feel-good measures without really solving any of the problems of schools in poverty. Defending his original argument, Campbell cites a RAND study that questions the results Chubb...
Mission Possible: States Take on Adolescent Literacy
IN October 2005, the National Governors Association published Reading to Achieve: A Governors Guide to Adolescent Literacy, asserting that poor readers in elementary and middle school are likely to struggle in high school and are most at risk of dropping...
Movers and Shakers, Then and Now
WHAT truly shakes up the education field? How does real change begin? I asked myself all sorts of questions like these after reading the results of a recent Education Week survey that rated which people, groups, reports, and media have the most influence...
No Med, No Ed?
IN APRIL 1997, a first-grade teacher in Millbrook, New York, a small town east of Poughkeepsie, filled out an ADHD rating form that reflected her suspicion that one of her students, Michael W., had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The school...
On Kentucky Fried Children and the Educational-Industrial Complex
WHILE ON a business trip to Washington, D.C., not long ago, my son Huck was given a driving tour of the city. Having suffered through several childhood D.C. vacation trips with his history-crazed mother, he found that the monuments had lost their novelty....
Still Muddling
IF THERE'S one thing that I've learned from more than half a century's observation, it's this: complex problems don't often yield to simple technical solutions. And this deduction is all the more true of complex social problems. You know, the ones...
Surprise-High School Reform Is Working: High School Reform Has Now Been on the National Agenda Long Enough That We Can Begin Reaching Conclusions about the Effectiveness of Various Approaches to It. the Authors Report on the Strategies and Their Results Thus Far, Finding That Progress Is Indeed Possible
THOSE who would reform America's education system have focused tremendous energy on improving the nation's high schools in the last half-decade. And the high schools have proved less impervious to change than many believed they would be. Spurred...
Teaching Even Hours a Week Leaves Children Behind
Suppose a teacher in an urban high school wanted to do more than survive. Suppose he wanted to do the job right. Sharpening his pencil and firing up his calculator, Mr. Gleibermann decided to find out just how long that would take. ********** ...
The Power of Personal Relationships
Teachers and administrators are often directed to distance themselves from the children in their charge. Despite the land mines that accompany personal relationships with students, Mr. Mawhinney and Ms. Sagan argue that educators can still learn to...
Things Fall Apart: NCLB Self-Destructs
SAID Chester Finn, president of the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation, "I should be handing out mood-altering pharmaceuticals, those that deal with depression." What had brought Finn down were presentations by Michael Casserly of the Council of the Great...
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