Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 90, No. 6, February

4th-Grade Readers ... Not Too Old to Snuggle: Children Continue to Need One-on-One Attention during Reading, Even When They're Too Big to Sit on Your Lap
Teachers and parents are well aware of the benefits of reading out loud to children, especially young children (Allington 2001; Davenport et al. 2004). Our kindergarten and 1st-grade classrooms are filled with the lovely sound of teachers reading books...
5 Ways to Improve Tutoring Programs: Evidence on Tutoring Points to Practices That Are Found in the Most Successful Tutoring Programs
Tutoring has become a familiar tool that schools use to reinforce classroom teaching and improve student achievement. That's especially been the case because of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) and its provisions for supplemental education. No matter...
Accelerate the Learning of 4th and 5th Graders Born into Poverty: Schools That Develop a "Sense of Understanding" in These Students Will See the Benefit in More Interested Students and More Retention of Learning
For students born into poverty, grades 4-5 are a boundary where their learning needs change dramatically and in ways that have been consistently misunderstood throughout the many waves of well-intentioned reform over the past century. As a result,...
Are You an Emerging Leader of Education?
Nominate yourself or a colleague to be recognized as an Emerging Leader by Phi Delta Kappa. This unique program recognizes young educators from around the world for their leadership, particularly relative to PDK's tenets: service, research, and...
Getting Better at Implementation
If you count something you find interesting, you will learn something interesting." This quote is from Atul Gawande, surgeon and author of Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance (Picador, 2008), in which he engagingly describes the difficulties and...
Inheriting the Education Wars
The media have been portraying Chicago Supt. Arne Duncan as some sort of a peacemaker, able to negotiate his way through the warring tents pitched outside the offices of the U.S. Department of Education. At least, that's the way his nomination as Secretary...
Is College the New High School?
Outsourcing American jobs will eventually destroy our education system. Our schools will be unrecognizable in 50 years--and not in a good way. Changes in our economy will destroy the integrity of U.S. colleges and, eventually, every public and private...
Kids Really Are Different These Days: Kids Today Aren't the Same as They Were Even a Few Years Ago. Social and Technological Changes Are Having an Effect on Their Social Development
You undoubtedly took a course on human development when you were preparing to teach and are reminded daily of developmental changes as students grow before your eyes. As a teacher, you're able to place theories and research on developmental domains...
Middle Childhood Is Unique Niche in Education: An Interview with David R. Mandel and Suzanne M. Wilson
Christine Finnan: I'm trying to get an idea of how the Middle Childhood Generalist Certification emerged. I assume people advocated for Early Childhood and Adolescent Certification and the Middle Childhood just happened as much from default as from...
PISA: Not Leaning Hard on U.S. Economy
The United States produces the lion's share of the world's best students." Well, of course, this statement didn't appear in any American publication. It appeared in Nature, the former English publication that now refers to itself as the "international...
Play and Social Interaction in Middle Childhood: Play Is Vital for a Child's Emotional and Cognitive Development. but Social and Technological Forces Threaten the Kinds of Play Kids Need Most
Play is important to the optimum development of children during their middle childhood years. Unfortunately, though there is abundant research evidence showing that play supports young children's social, emotional, physical, and cognitive development,...
Reversal of Fortune?
In spring 2000, Angelo Calabrese's school district in Amherst, Ohio, determined that he was eligible for special education services based on diagnoses of a specific learning disability and AD/HD. In 10th grade (2004-05), Angelo had an excessive...
Supporting and Nurturing Students and Teachers in Grades 3-6: Upper Elementary Grades Are a Neglected Area of Schooling, Even as Accountability Relies on Their Achievements
I really could benefit from a professional organization. Some of the magazines focus on younger and others on older students, and I ask, "Where do my kids fit in?" There is a little piece here and there. We get 5th graders reading on a 2nd- or 3rd-grade...
Teaching the Truth Is Not Easy
Are you going to talk about Indians?" asked the boy in the front row. "Well, sort of," I said, preoccupied with figuring out how to advance my PowerPoint slides. Then the little red-haired girl started to bounce up and down and wave her arm wildly...
Thank You, Mr. Russove
Jack Russove turned my life around. And he did it in his 6th-grade classroom at Benjamin Franklin Elementary School in Manitowoc, Wisconsin. I entered Mr. Russove's classroom at a tender point in my life. I was--once again--the new girl in a new...
The Joys of Teaching the Upper Elementary Grades: Effective Teachers Motivate Students by Helping Them Get Hooked on Learning, a Habit That Will Satisfy for a Lifetime
I just finished my 14th year as an educator. I have taught students in each of the elementary grades, from prekindergarten to 6th, and coached middle schoolers in several sports. I have deeply enjoyed and cherished my time with children at every one...
Thinking around the Corner: The Power of Information Literacy: Information Literacy Means More Than Just Finding the Facts. It Means Being Able to Verify Those Facts and Then Evaluate Information in a Complex Technological Environment
Question Authority" is not just an old bumper sticker. Questioning authority has now become a critical element of information literacy. In today's world, students require not only academic rigor, but also the information literacy skills to recognize...
Upper Elementary Grades Bear the Brunt of Accountability: Educators Claim That Accountability Forces Them to Narrow the Curriculum. but a Comparison of Teachers' Schedules before and after NCLB Shows That Little Has Changed
Upper elementary teachers won't be surprised to learn that in every state, students enrolled in grades 3 through 8 bear the brunt of educational accountability. All states test all students at these grade levels in English/language arts and mathematics...
What Makes a Great Teacher? PDK Summit Offers Many Ideas: Great Teachers Do More Than Just Advance Student Learning. They Also Spread Their Own Expertise to Other Teachers
In his office, Thomas Guskey has a poster of a photo from 1989. In the photo, one student is standing in front of four tanks in Tiananmen Square in Beijing. To Guskey, the photo symbolizes courage--the same courage that educators need to call upon....
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