Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 88, No. 7, March

A Do-It-Yourself Club
SAY THE word "literacy" to most people, and they'll think first of the ability to read. Perhaps shortly afterward they'll come up with the ability to write. And of course, their responses would be right as far as they go. That's what the word means...
Casualties of Reform: In New York, They Took Steps to Leave No Child Behind Almost a Decade Ago. the Results? According to Some, Higher Standards and Higher Achievement. According to Mr. Connors, the Supplanting of Excellence by Mediocrity
IN ALL the debate about what it will take to realize the grand promises of No Child Left Behind, we've somehow managed to miss the most important truth: it isn't going to work no matter how much money we feed it. The principles that drive NCLB are...
Confronting the Achievement Gap
Why is there an achievement gap? Why has it persisted in spite of everything we've tried to do to eliminate or at least narrow it? What should we be doing? Mr. Gardner takes a hard look at these questions and offers some answers that we don't usually...
Errors and Allegations: About Research on Homework
In his September Kappan article, Alfie Kohn questioned the need for homework, challenging several researchers who claimed to have confirmed its benefit for children of all ages. Mr. Marzano and Ms. Pickering, two of those researchers, now challenge...
Farewell to a Farewell to Arms: Deemphasizing the Whole-Class Novel; the Common Practice in English Language Arts Classes of Assigning All Students to Read the Same Book at the Same Time Is a Tradition, the Authors Believe, That Would Be More Honored in the Breach Than the Observance
ASK ANY group of adults ranging in age from their early twenties to late fifties what they remember about middle or high school reading, and you will no doubt hear an unenthusiastic and often bitter chorus of such titles as To Kill a Mockingbird, Lord...
Geography in American History Courses
Geography has long been a stepchild of U.S. education. Now, with accountability pressures shrinking the curriculum, there is even less of a chance that geography will take its place as a separate subject. Mr. Thornton suggests that the best solution...
Getting Children In2Books: Engagement in Authentic Reading, Writing, and Thinking
Getting children excited about--"in2"--reading and writing is the first step in developing high-level literacy. An innovative program based on this premise is producing excellent results with urban elementary students who had struggled with language...
Looking beyond NCLB
IT MAY seem improbable or even heretical to some, but the No Child Left Behind Act is likely to become irrelevant. That is, its influence will dwindle unless its policies and purse are directed toward supporting changes in teaching and learning that...
Public Education in Philadelphia: The Crucial Need for Civic Capacity in a Privatized Environment
A broad coalition of educators and community groups is necessary to achieve equity and excellence in urban schools, Ms. Blanc and Ms. Simon argue. But the Philadelphia schools' system of privatization and strict contractual obligations presents obstacles...
Radically Redefining Literacy Instruction: An Immense Opportunity
Students in today's English and language arts classes typically are not asked to read, discuss, or write analytically. But by emphasizing such authentic literacy activities, Mr. Schmoker maintains, we could bring about the results that all our reforms...
Should NAEP Performance Standards Be Used for Setting Standards for State Assessments?
The National Assessment of Educational Progress is considered the "gold standard" of assessment. However, Mr. Pellegrino warns, those who are setting proficiency standards for state tests to meet the requirements of NCLB should be wary of using NAEP's...
States Seek to Leverage Assistance
IF YOU'RE driving down a narrow dirt road and find a 500-pound boulder blocking your path, you're probably not going to hop out of the car and roll it out of the way. You need leverage. So you might find a small rock to use as a fulcrum and a strong...
Summery Disposition
IN THE spring of 2004, Peer Larson was a sophomore at Whitnall High School in Greenfield, Wisconsin, which is near Milwaukee. His schedule for the following fall included a precalculus course, taught by Aaron Bienek. The course was part of the honors...
Technology for Individuals with Special Needs
TODAY, technology in our schools is rapidly changing, and educators need to stay aware of the different types of technology available for use with individuals with special needs. The websites described below provide information about assistive technology...
Test Scores and Economic Growth
SOMEWHERE around 2000, I observed that, while people argued vehemently that good schools led to improved national economies, there wasn't much in the way of evidence for that contention. And there was certainly one glaring counterexample: Japan. Kids...
The Caveat Emptor Index
IN January 2006, I used this space to depart from my all-too-dystopic view of the world of education reform to welcome, albeit tepidly, the Canadian Council on Learning (CCL). I spent several paragraphs describing the political risks that historically...
The Other Office
PEOPLE WHO teach technology courses often debate the utility and ethics of teaching students to use software that they either won't buy or can't afford to buy. Microsoft Office, which costs from $250 to $400, is a good example. Many schools and universities...
Using Early Literacy Monitoring to Prevent Reading Failure: Children Need to Become Capable and Confident Readers by the End of Second Grade. Ms. Sloat, Ms. Beswick, and Mr. Willms Describe a Means of Keeping Close Tabs on Children's Development in This Crucial Skill
MOST CHILDREN who do not learn to read during the primary grades will probably never learn to read well. Children who reach the end of third grade with low literacy skills typically have less access to the regular curriculum, require long-term support,...
What I Learned about Teaching at the Great Wall of China: You Wouldn't Think a Veteran Teacher with More Than Three Decades of Experience Would Need to Reinvent Himself and His Methods. but Half a World Away, Mr. Squire Did Just That
AS I PAUSED to gaze across the magnificent panorama spread before me, it struck me: I was in another world--China. I had no idea that what I imagined as a leisurely stroll on the Great Wall of China would turn out to be such a strenuous workout, much...
Which Achievement Gap?
The terms "achievement gap" and "AYP" are often bandied about in this era of NCLB. But is making AYP the same as closing the achievement gap? And shouldn't we be talking about multiple achievement gaps? The authors explain the finer points of these...

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