Phi Delta Kappan

Founded in 1915, the Phi Delta Kappan is a professional policy journal for K-12 educators and is owned and published by Phi Delta Kappa International. Also referred to as the Kappan, the journal runs concurrently with the U.S. school year, with issues being released September to May and a combined December/January issue. The Kappan's editorial headquarters are located in Bloomington, Ind.The Kappan has a circulation of 33,000 subscribers and publishes articles directed to an audience of K-12 teachers, principals, superintendents, school district administrators and professors. Founded in 1906 to serve all members of the educational community, the journal's owner, Phi Delta Kappa International, maintains a large network of campus-based chapters with members in the United States, Canada, Europe and Asia. Articles within the journal primarily address issues related to educational research, service and leadership. Examples of specialized topics within these articles include information on inclusion, class size, testing, tenure, professional certification and alternative school systems. In addition to featured articles, each year the journal publishes results of the Phi Delta Kappa International "Gallup Poll of the Public's Attitude Toward the Public Schools."In June of 2010,the APEX 2010 Awards honored Phi Delta Kappan's Editor-in-Chief, Joan Richardson, and Design Director, Carol Bucheri, for Publication Excellence. Richardson received a Grand Award for her Kappan column, "The Editor's Note," and Bucheri received an APEX Award of Excellence in the Best Redesigns category–an award category that includes highly competitive submissions from a wide range of professional journals, newspapers, newsletters, annual reports, brochures and websites. The Editor-in-Chief of the Phi Delta Kappan is Joan Richardson. David M. Ruetschlin is Managing Editor and Carol Bucheri is Design Director.

Articles from Vol. 101, No. 1, September

2018-2019 Supreme Court Highlights: Three Cases Have Significant Implications for Education
Like many people and organizations, the U.S. Supreme Court often pushes its hardest work to the end of its calendar; but this is not due to procrastination. When cases are difficult, it takes time to develop thoughtful legal theories and build coalitions...
Are Schools Adequately Funded?
Six in 10 parents and all adults, and 75% of teachers, say their community's schools have too little money. Blacks especially say so--73%, compared with 57% of Whites. It's a view that's much more prevalent among Democrats than Republicans (72% vs. 45%)...
Assistant Superindent Wants to Help Teaches Deal with Frustration
Q: I'm looking for ways to help teachers in my district deal with frustration. I'm an assistant superintendent, and I spend a good deal of time in schools working with teachers who often feel frustrated with their students and do not have the tools to...
Broad Discontent Leads Half of Teachers to Consider Quitting Their Jobs: Parents and Teachers Align in Their View That a Lack of Funding Is Hurting Public Schools
Frustrated by poor pay and underfunded schools, half of public school teachers nationally have seriously considered leaving the profession in the past few years--and majorities in the 2019 PDK Poll of the Public's Attitudes Toward the Public Schools...
Does Religious Study Belong in Public Schools?
A recent trend toward including Bible studies in public high schools wins majority support in the 2019 PDK poll, with the provision that Bible studies should be an elective, not a requirement. Support is higher for including comparative religion classes,...
Do Teachers Feel Valued by Their Communities?
Public school teachers' views that they are underpaid and their schools underfunded tie in with a broader concern over the way teachers say they feel valued by their communities. Only about half--52%--say their community values them a great deal or a...
Education on the Campaign Trail: Student Loans, Teacher Pay, and School Segregation Are among the Education Issues Likely to Influence the 2020 Presidential Campaign
Summer in Washington used to mean a welcome reprieve from the city's obsession with politics. But this year, even after the killer heat and humidity arrived, the business of Washington remained a constant. Here inside the Beltway, the next presidential...
Educator Licensure OVERLAP in the Early Grades: Why It Occurs, Why It Matters, and What to Do about It: The Requirements to Teach Young Children Should Take into Account the Specific Developmental Needs of Early Childhood
Early childhood is widely recognized as a distinct phase of human development, extending from birth through age eight, during which children develop important physical, social-emotional, and cognitive skills (Allen & Kelly, 2015). To date, 48 states...
Goal-Setting Practices That Support a Learning Culture: Having Students Set Their Own Goals and Monitor Their Progress Is Most Effective When Teachers Are Able to Create a Culture, Rather Than Follow Prescriptive Steps
Getting students to understand where they are in their learning is a steep challenge with potential for a huge payoff when you are seeking to build school and classroom cultures where improvement and growth flourish. So what can educators do to help...
How Do You Assess School Quality?
The potential for large numbers of teachers to leave the profession poses a challenge to schools on a variety of fronts. One of those is how parents assess school quality--because more parents cite teachers and staff as the key ingredient than any other...
How Do You Rate School Problems and Pressures?
The PDK poll asked parents to rate problems and pressures in the school their child or oldest child attends, and teachers to rate the same challenges at the school where they work. As mentioned in the introduction to this report, 50% of teachers see...
How Much Should Schools Focus on Workforce Preparation?
Parents and adults (each 53%) agree that academics should be the focus of a public school education while teachers say the main goal should be preparing students to be good citizens (45%) or preparing them academically (37%). Just about 2 in 10 parents,...
How Should Public Schools Handle Discipline?
When it comes to school discipline, support for zero tolerance is less than it seems, mediation wins substantial support--and trust in school administrators is less than complete. There's been a change in views over the years: In the first PDK poll in...
How Would You Grade the Public Schools?
The PDK poll continues its long-standing tradition of asking the public to grade the public schools nationally and locally. Customary dichotomies emerge: Just i9% of Americans give the nation's schools an A or B grade, while many more give an A or B...
It's Not Fair, I Don't Want to Share: When Child Development and Teacher Expectations Clash: Young Children May Know about the Importance of Sharing without Yet Being Able to Act on That Knowledge
Promoting cooperative social behavior is a--perhaps the--major task of preschool teachers. But when teaching children to be nice and to share with and include one another, teachers have to contend with the fact that young children often do not want...
Meeting Charter Schools in the Middle
At the policy level, it's important to kkeep debating the pros and cons of charter schools. But on the ground, system leaders must come to terms with them. Every summer, PDK hosts a national conference for members of Educators Rising, our Career and...
Nowhere to Go but Up
Here at PDK headquarters, we were startled and stunned by the results of last year's Poll: For the first time since 1969, when we began surveying Americans on their attitudes toward the public schools, the majority of respondents (54%) said they would...
Positive Trends for (Some) U.S. Kids
The 2019 Kids Count Data Book shows that U.S. children overall are faring the same as or better than they were in 2010 on 15 of 16 indicators of child well-being. The indicators measured include: Economic Well-Being * Children in poverty: 18% in 2017,...
Preparing Effective Principal Supervisors
The role of the principal is changing. So must the role of the principal supervisor. The principal's job today is very different from 20 years ago. Yes, principals are still expected to manage building operations, but increasingly, they are also expected...
Race, Power, and Minority Parent Participation: The Idea of Cultural Mismatch Is an Inadequate Explanation for Some of the Difficulties Minority Parents Encounter with Their Children's Schools
Over the last 50 years, attitudes about parent participation in the public schools have changed dramatically. Not long ago, most educators kept parents at a distance, telling them to come no closer than the playground (McGeeney, 1969). Today, however,...
Should Students Study Civics?
A nearly unanimous 97% of Americans say public schools should be teaching civics, including 70% saying it should be required. According to a 2018 report by Education Week, only eight states require students to enroll in a yearlong civics or government...
Surprising New Evidence on Summer Learning Loss: New Research Findings Challenge Common Assumptions about Summer Learning Loss
In 1996, a team of scholars at the University of Missouri conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of earlier research on the extent to which students learn and/or forget academic content and skills during the summer months (Cooper et al., 1996). They...
Teachers: A Demographic Profile
Public school teachers differ from the general public on a variety of demographic as well as attitudinal measures--education, gender, age, and income among them. At the same time, they look similar on political measures when compared with their closest...
Teacher Wants to Know If He Has to Call a Student 'They'
Q: I'm a teacher in a middle school, and I'm PC to a point. I don't care if a kid is gay or transgender, but I have to draw the line somewhere, and here's my line. One of my students has asked me to call her "they," and I won't do it. Just pick a gender...
The Best-Laid Plans of Mice and Men: A Story about Language, Learning, and the Differing Perspectives Teachers and Students May Bring to the Classroom
Many years ago, I completed a master's degree program focused on literacy instruction. I had become well versed in some of the best thinking of the day from professors who were experts in their fields. I was quite impressed with my accomplishment. Until...
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