Wordsworth Circle

International quarterly journal focusing on contemporary studies of literature, culture, and society primarily in England during Romantic period.

Articles from Vol. 35, No. 3, Summer

Coleridge's Joy
Bacchus expressed the organic energies of the Universe which work by passion--a joy without consciousness; while Minerva, & c., imported the preordaining intellect. --Coleridge (Shakespearean Criticism 2:6) Wordsworth...
Joanna Baillie: Speculations on Legal Cruelty
In the Introductory Discourse to the plays (1798), Joanna Baillie claimed that from reading her plays judges, magistrates, advocates and, by implication, all those who administered the law would acquire a discernment of character and administer punishment...
Obscenity, Censorship, and the Eighteenth-Century Novel: The Case of John Cleland
I It is tempting to cast the eighteenth-century novelist John Cleland, best known during his lifetime (as now) as the author of the scandalous Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure, in the role of rebel against censorial tyranny, a martyr in the ongoing...
Reading as a Criminal in Early Nineteenth-Century Fiction
According to Humphry Potter's A New Dictionary of All the Cant and Flash Languages, first published in 1797, criminals are "better enabled to carry on their Work of Depredation, by using a Language known only to themselves, by speaking and conversing...
"Spirit Divine! with Thee I'll Wander": Mary Robinson and Coleridge in Poetic Dialogue
I On February 1,1801, Coleridge reported that Mary Robinson wrote him "a most affecting, heart-rending Letter a few weeks before she died, to express what she called her death bed affection & esteem for me--the very last lines of her Letter...
The Romantic Matter of Fact
"A shilling life will give you all the facts." The note of knowing scorn in the opening line of Auden's sonnet "Who's Who" (Collected Poems 126) suggests, not that facts are wrong exactly, but that the only facts you are ever likely to establish in...
"The Secularization of Suffering: Toward a Theory of Gothic Subjectivity"
To name a sensibility, to draw its contours and to recount its history, requires a deep sympathy modified by revulsion. --Susan Sontag Passion has little to do with euphoria and everything to do with patience. It is not about...
Trials in Romantic-Era Writing: Modernity, Guilt, and the Scene of Justice
Culturally central, spectacular trials--the trial and execution of Louis XVI and his family (1792-93), the sedition and treason trials of the London Corresponding Society defendants (1793-94), the Reign of Terror (1793-94), William Hone's blasphemy...
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