Wordsworth Circle

International quarterly journal focusing on contemporary studies of literature, culture, and society primarily in England during Romantic period.

Articles from Vol. 40, No. 1, Winter

Atlantic Exile and the Stateless Citizen in Irish Romanticism
A recurring difficulty, and opportunity, in Irish studies turns on the fluid conceptualization of Ireland's geographical position across the period of colonial domination. In global terms, Ireland was variously positioned "on the edge of Europe," in...
Byron's Dying Gladiator in Context
Stephen Larrabee's English Bards and Grecian Marbles (1943) marvellously unravelled and traced the genealogy of Byron's tale of the love-sick French maiden in Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, Canto IV, Stanza 162 (hereafter CHP, and quoted by canto number...
Coleridge and the Radical Roots of Critical Philosophy
In Biographia Literaria (1817), Coleridge wrote that his initial encounter with Kant's philosophy "took possession of me as with a giant's hand" (Biographia 1: 153), as if it were a sudden moment of mystical conversion. The metaphor of being possessed...
Harriet Martineau's Anti-Romanticism
On May 23, 1850, exactly a month after the death of William Wordsworth, there was a violent spring thunderstorm over Thirlmere and Helvellyn. Watching the spectacle from Ambleside, a few miles away, Harriet Martineau wrote to her friend, Fanny Wedgwood,...
The 2009 Wordsworth Summer Conference
Monday, July 27 to Thursday, August 6 at Forest Side, Grasmere, Cumbria Keynote Lecturers: Part 1 (27 July to 1 August) Frances Ferguson, Paul H Fry, Stephen Gill, Claire Lament, Nicholas Roe, Fiona Stafford Part 2 (1 to 6 August) Gillian Beer,...
The "Ode to Duty" and the Idea of Human Solidarity
To suggest the origins of Wordsworth's later idea of community, I will trace a progression of his thinking about the freedom of the imagination and the opposition between imagination and duty: a dominant concern of his poetry in the decade 1798-1807....
The Paradoxes of Nature in Wordsworth and Coleridge
Coleridge and Wordsworth, especially in the late 1790s, are rather loosely thought of as having been primarily "nature poets." The matter will bear being looked into little further, however: how far did their views of nature converge, how far was there--as...
Translating the Elgin Marbles: Byron, Hemans, Keats
Every day, visitors come to the British Museum and contemplate a remarkable collection of sculptures created in Greece some twenty-four centuries ago. The events that translated these ancient artworks into an English context took place at the beginning...
Why Kendal? John Thelwall, Laker Poet?
In November, 1803, "Citizen" John Thelwall, the once-notorious Jacobin orator, stopped at Grasmere and Keswick on his way to Scotland to deliver elocutionary lectures. According to biographers, this visit marked the definitive end of Thelwall's friendship...
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