Wordsworth Circle

International quarterly journal focusing on contemporary studies of literature, culture, and society primarily in England during Romantic period.

Articles from Vol. 40, No. 2-3, Spring-Summer

Coleridge's Captain Derkheim
When Coleridge returned to England from Italy in 1806, he landed at Stagate Creek, the quarantine station for ships with clean bills of health, on August 17, and was in London by the following day. (1) On August 19, he wrote to Robert Southey of the...
John Clare, the Popular Wood-Cut and the Bible: A Venture into the History of Popular Culture
Although as a child, Clare often missed Sunday church, later in life, he attended church services and held a deep reverence for the King James Bible, the Book of Common Prayer, and the Church of England (aside from a fling with the Primitive Methodists)...
Joseph Johnson
At the 124th Annual Convention of the Modern Language Association, the Division on the English Romantic Period offered three panels. The first, organized by William Galperin, took up "The Romantic Event"; the second, with Saree Makdisi presiding, discussed...
Joseph Johnson: Webmaster
Over forty-eight years, Joseph Johnson published and marketed 2700 books or fifty-six books a year, 1242 in the stormy 1790's alone, as Leslie Chard observed in "Joseph Johnson in the 1790s" (TWC, XXXIII:3 [summer, 2002]100) He read few of them, edited...
Silencing Joseph Johnson and the Analytical Review
Joseph Johnson's Analytical Review, from May, 1788, to December, 1798, offered a radical contribution to journalism that for a decade confounded the British government's attempts to restrict the freedom of the liberal press. The Analytical ceased publication...
"Some Unknown Man, Unheard Of": Wordsworth and the English Regicide
In Book I of Wordsworth's Prelude stand these inscrutable lines: ... Or I would record How, in tyrannic times, some unknown man, Unheard of in the chronicles of kings, Suffered in silence for the love of truth ... (1805 I, 201-204) Who...
The Revolt of Islam: Vegetarian Shelley and the Narrative of Mental Pathology
In his Preface to Prometheus Unbound (1820) Percy Bysshe Shelley declares that his imagery has "been drawn from the operations of the human mind." Similarly in The Revolt of Islam (1818) Shelley attempts to translate the imagery of the "labouring brain,"...
The Unromantic Lives of Others: The Lost Generation of the 1790s
I am willing to accept that there could be a genre or sub-genre of biographical writing that could be usefully designated by the term, "Romantic biography." That is, a qualitative definition, rather than a quantitative description of all the biographies...
"True Impossibility": Editing Byron
The title of my paper is a grateful salute to Jerome McGann and it refers to what he said about editing the Clarendon Byron: "having at last learned what scholarly editing entailed, I began to realize the true impossibility of the task I had [...]...
Twisty Little Passages: The Several Editions of Lady Caroline Lamb's Glenarvon
Glenarvon was published in 1816 by Henry Colburn, who advanced Lady Caroline Lamb [pounds sterling]200 with an agreement to pay [pounds sterling]300 upon publication. He must have anticipated decent sales, for he had recently paid an established writer,...
William Newton: Anna Seward's "Peak Minstrel"
William Newton (1750-1830), the son of a Peak District carpenter and himself a professional machinery carpenter and later mill-owner at Tideswell, was the protege of Anna Seward, the Swan of Lichfield, who fashioned a role for him as "the Peak Minstrel."...
Wordsworth, Joseph Johnson, and the Salisbury Plain Poems
In December, 1792, on his return from France, Wordsworth brought the manuscripts of An Evening Walk and Descriptive Sketches to Joseph Johnson for publication. Johnson was a respected, successful and well-known liberal publisher, friendly to authors...