New York Times Upfront

A news magazine for teens. Features coverage of current events, entertainment and trends on national and international events. Encourages high school students to consider different points of view.

Articles from Vol. 140, No. 2, September 17

10 Supreme Court Cases Every Teen Should Know: More of the Court's Most Important Rulings on Freedom of Speech and Privacy at School, and Other Issues Affecting Teenagers: Part 2
Part 1 of this article (Upfront, Sept. 3, 2007) addressed five Supreme Court cases dealing with issues both in and out of the classroom, including students' right to protest, school prayer, and how the legal system treats teenagers. Part 2 looks at...
1957 Sputnik Launches the Space Race: At the Height of the Cold War, the Soviet Union Sent the First Satellite into Space. A Stunned America Reacted by Jump-Starting Its Space Program, Leading to the Historic Moon Landing 12 Years Later
It weighed 184 pounds and was about as big as a basketball. But as historian Daniel J. Boorstin would later write, "Never before had so small and so harmless an object created such consternation." The object was Sputnik, a small aluminum sphere...
A Mother Daughter Culture Clash: Chandra Touch Has Struggled to Make Her Mother, a Cambodian Immigrant, Understand Her American Lifestyle and Ambitions
For the last three years, I was a varsity cheerleader for the Portland High Bulldogs. I loved being involved in big school events like homecoming and pep rallies. But like a lot of things I did in high school, my mom just didn't get it. I'm a first...
Back in the Game: With American Indians Reasserting Their Heritage through Lacrosse-A Game Invented by Their Ancestors-They're Helping to Make It One of the Country's Fastest-Growing Sports
Tim Glass's mother tells him that he was born with a lacrosse stick in his hand, because his ancestors invented the game. Tim, 14, and his two younger brothers sometimes practice their chosen sport in T-shirts that say, "It's in our blood." In Oneida...
Brother Act: In the Year since Fidel Castro Fell Ill, Cuba Has Been in Limbo. His Brother, Raul, Is Acting President, but Fidel Is Still Making His Presence Felt
1 Cuba's economic collapse is evident in the decrepit neighborhoods of Havana. 2 Rater Castro has been acting President for more than a year. 3 Fide| Castro, in a photo released in August 2006, a month after he fell ill and temporarily handed...
Greenhouse Gases: By the Numbers
Greenhouse gases, pegged by scientists as a chief cause of climate change, are a mix of water vapor, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and ozone. They're produced by the burning of gasoline, heating oil, coat, and other fossil fuels. When...
Hot Topic
Everyone seems to be talking--or singing, or making a movie--about global warming. But despite rising awareness, misconceptions abound about what scientists prefer to call climate change. Take our pop quiz and find out how much you really know. ...
Japan: Why the Jury Is Still Out: Can the Jury System Work in Japan, Where Speaking Up and Expressing Opinions Go against Deeply Held Cultural Values?
For two days at a mock trial in Nagano, Japan, three judges and six jurors sit stiffly around an oval table, deliberating whether the defendant intended to kill a taxi driver in a botched robbery. But the jurors never engage one another in discussion,...
Minding Their Own Business: Why Does the United States Produce So Many Successful Young Entrepreneurs?
Bill Gates founded Microsoft when he was 19. Facebook was the brainchild of Mark Zuckerberg, a Harvard University sophomore at the time. And a recent study showed that the United States has a higher business startup rate among 18- to 24-year-olds than...
Should the U.S. Have a National Health-Care System? Health Care Is Likely to Be One of the Key Issues in Next Year's Election
YES We have two healthcare systems in America. People with good insurance get excellent care. But most families are just one bad break, like a lost job or a serious illness, away from crisis. I believe we should build one America, with one health...
Stolen Futures: When They Started College Four Years Ago, Iraq's Freshmen Had Big Ambitions. by Graduation Day, Their Dreams of a Successful Life-At Least in Iraq-Had Been Shattered
They started college just before or after the American invasion in 2003 with dreams of new friends and parties, brilliant teachers, and advanced degrees that would lead to good careers, marriage, and children. Success seemed well within their grasp....
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