Archaeology in Oceania

Archaeology in Oceania is a magazine specializing in History topics.

Articles from Vol. 44, No. 2, July

A New Test of the Sex of the Lake Mungo 3 Skeleton
The Lake Mungo 3 (LM 3) skeleton currently represents the oldest known human remains from the continent of Australia (Thorne et al. 1999; Bowler et al. 2003). The skeleton, which is also sometimes referred to as Willandra Lakes Hominid 3 or WLH 3,...
Cultural Chronology of Earthworks in Palau, Western Micronesia
Babeldaob, the largest island in the Palau archipelago, is dominated by clusters of morphologically diverse earth architecture. At European contact, in the late 18th century, the massive structures in the island's interior were unoccupied and failed...
GIS for Managing the Analysis and Protection of Archaeological Remains in the Willandra Lakes World Heritage Area
Preserving cultural heritage for future generations and research Increasing emphasis is being placed on systematically managing and protecting the irreplaceable resource of cultural heritage (Cornish, 2004, Matero et al. 1998). Modern day attitudes...
Legacy of an Ice Age: Foreword
The Willandra Lakes World Heritage Area (WLWHA) in general, and Lake Mungo in particular, stand in iconic testimony to Australia's unique natural and cultural history. Sadly, the quantity and quality of available published information does less than...
Murray-Darling Basin Freshwater Shells: Riverine Reservoir Effect
Freshwater mussel shells and fish otoliths have provided the most consistent set of radiocarbon ages for the Willandra Lakes archaeological sites, but disagreements between shell and charcoal ages from the same locations have been common (e.g. Bowler...
The Archaeology of Mungo and the Willandra Lakes: Looking Back, Looking Forward
Twenty five years ago. Peter Hiscock published a critique of methodological frameworks used in Australian archaeology (1983:51). He pointed out three problem areas, firstly, the application of inappropriate levels of analysis (scale); secondly, a failure...
The Mark of Ancient Java Is on None of Them
Since the initial palaeoanthropological research of Weidenreich (1943, 1945 and 1946), there has been much emphasis on the role of Homo erectus from Indonesia (or Sunda) in the peopling of Ancient Australia (or Sahul). In a 1965 summary of the known...
The Meaning and Importance of the Lapita Face Motif
[FIGURE 1 OMITTED] We are not confident we know who was the first person to suggest that the 'eyes', 'noses', and 'faces' sometimes seen drawn on Lapita pottery sherds and whole vessels are those of human beings, i.e. that they are anthropomorphic...
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