Archaeology in Oceania

Archaeology in Oceania is a magazine specializing in History topics.

Articles from Vol. 42, No. 3, October

A Matter of Balance: An Overview of Pleistocene Occupation History and the Impact of the Last Glacial Phase in East Timor and the Aru Islands, Eastern Indonesia
Abstract This paper explores the subsistence records from cave sites with Pleistocene-aged deposits in East Timor and the Aru Islands during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), and discusses these records within the context of the limited archaeological...
A Radiocarbon Sequence for Samoan Prehistory and the Pulemelei Mound
Abstract We examine radiocarbon dates from Samoan archaeological sites using the fourfold division of Samoan prehistory established by Green (2002). The context of dating samples was assessed to recognize potentially "reliable" determinations in...
Climate Change and Archaeology in the Pacific
All but one of the papers on this topic published in this and the next issue of Archaeology in Oceania were first presented in the Indo-Pacific Prehistory Association conference in Manila in March 2006. The session was organized by Julie Field and...
Climate Variability in the Mid to Late Holocene Arnhem Land Region, North Australia: Archaeological Archives of Environmental and Cultural Change
Abstract A number of archaeologists have suggested that significant climatic change with environmental and social consequences occurred between 1000 and 400 years ago in the Indo-Pacific region. We investigate this premise by examining the archaeological...
Clothing and Modern Human Behaviour: Prehistoric Tasmania as a Case Study
Abstract A general model is outlined showing how the prehistoric development of clothing for thermal reasons may be relevant to the emergence of modern human behaviour. A distinction is drawn between simple and complex clothing, with the latter...
Geophysical Investigations at the Pulemelei Mound
Abstract Remote sensing methods--ground penetrating radar (GPR) and cesium magnetometer--were employed to investigate the internal structure of the Pulemelei mound, a large earth oven (umu ti) and a smaller stone and earth structure to the north...
In Search of Tagaloa: Pulemelei, Samoan Mythology and Science
Abstract This article touches upon views gained from traditional or oral history together with views of modern scientific method to reach at understandings of past actions. The text presents an emic view concerning the Pulemelei mound and a ceremony...
Monumental Architecture in West Polynesia: Origins, Chiefs and Archaeological Approaches
Abstract In West Polynesia, monumental structures with a volume [greater than or equal to] 2500 [m.sup.2] include mounds of earth or stone that in traditional history were used to house or bury chiefs, as well as being the focus of ceremonial and...
Preface
"E mana'o i le vao, ae, fefe i le aitu" [We want the forest, yet fear the Spirits] is a Samoan proverb used by Malama Meleisea (1980:21) to describe the contradiction between the development of the society (social progress) and traditional culture...
Samoan Archaeology: A Review of Research History
Abstract This paper describes the history of archaeology carried out in the Samoan islands. Two archaeological programs under the leadership of Roger Green in the 1960s and Jesse Jennings in the 1970s have laid a firm foundation for the understanding...
Settlement Patterns-Social and Ritual Space in Prehistoric Samoa
Abstract This paper explores the extensive prehistoric settlement pattern at the Letolo plantation. Using the results of earlier research we use a correspondence analysis to investigate variation in the settlement pattern, particularly differences...
The Excavation of Pulemelei Site 2002-2004
Abstract This paper describes the results of archaeological excavations in the Pulemelei mound on Savai'i, thought to be the largest freestanding stone structure in Polynesia, in 2002-4. These excavations comprise the first large-scale archaeological...
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