Eire-Ireland: a Journal of Irish Studies

Eire-Ireland: a Journal of Irish Studies is a magazine specializing in Social Science topics.

Articles from Vol. 38, No. 1-2, Spring-Summer

An Beal Bocht: Mouthing off at National Identity
"I am an outlaw." Myles-na-Coppaleen, in Dion Boucicault, The Colleen Bawn A MAJOR development in relation to language and identity in the "long" Irish twentieth-century (reaching back to the ferment of the 1880s and 1890s) was the countering...
Editors' Introduction: Language and Identity in Twentieth-Century Ireland
What the eye is to the lover ... language--whatever language history has made his or her mother-tongue--is to the patriot. Through that language, encountered at mother's knee and parted with only at the grave, pasts are restored, fellowships...
Faultlines, Limits, Transgressions: A Theme-Cluster in Late Twentieth-Century Irish Poetry
Lines of history lines of power ... Lines of defiance lines of discord under Walker's arm brisk with guns British soldiers patrol the walls the gates between Ulster Catholic Ulster Protestant.... Lines of loss ...
Language, Monuments, and the Politics of Memory in Quebec and Ireland
CONTEMPORARY Ireland and Quebec each have centuries of complex language traditions in which Irish, English, and French have jostled in different ways at different periods of time. This article examines two sites--the 1909 Celtic cross at Grosse Ile,...
Notes and Queries
The Irish Research Funds were established by the Irish American Cultural Institute in 1988 in the belief that responsible inquiry into the Irish American experience is crucial to providing a lasting record of Ireland and America's history, traditions,...
One Language, Two Tongues: George Fitzmaurice's Use of Hiberno-English Dialect
To grow a second tongue, as harsh a humiliation as twice to be born. Decades later that child's grandchild's speech stumbles over lost syllables of an old order. John Montague, "A Grafted Tongue" GEORGE FITZMAURICE is generally...
Portrait of a Mythographer: Discourses of Identity in the Work of Father James McDyer
Their attitude [the farmers of Gleann Cholmcille] sprang from their traditionally disenfranchised existence and their isolation from involvement in progress. James McDyer, An Autobiography I inherited my strong sense of nationalism from my own father,...
Regional Roots: The BBC and Poetry in Northern Ireland, 1945-55
IN nineteenth-century France the salons of Princess Mathilde, Madame Sabatier, and others served as way stations between authority and art--places where the state and the writer could use each other for power, prestige, and influence. Patrons found...
Seal Sa Domhan Thoir: Sojourn in the Eastern World
WHEN I was a very small child, farmed out to my Aunt May in the West Kerry Gaeltacht, (1) one of our great joys was listening to wondertales in which the hero had to make a perilous journey to an Domhan Thoir, 'the Eastern World', usually to bring...
The Shock of the Old: Translating Early Irish Poetry into Modern Irish
TWENTIETH-CENTURY readers of English without a knowledge of Old Irish (ca. 600-900 A.D.) or Middle Irish (ca. 900-1200 A.D.) were given reasonably good access to early medieval Irish poetry through the medium of the translation anthology. Through the...
"The Watcher," Paul Henry. (Cover Story)
The illustration featured on the cover of this volume is a painting by Paul Henry (1876-1958) called "The Watcher." It was completed during the period in his life when he lived on Achill Island (1910-19) and was first exhibited in Belfast in 1911....
Translating Ireland Back into Eire: Gael Linn and Film Making in Irish
Without films in Irish all the work done for the language in the schools, on the radio and by voluntary organisations is doomed to ultimate failure no matter how effectively it is done. Films in Irish, anonymous booklet published in 1950 by the...
"We Must Learn Where We Live": Language, Identity, and the Colonial Condition in Brian Friel's Translations
MILITARY imperialism is only the first step in establishing imperial hegemony--and an uneconomic one at that. (1) It is costly and, by itself, produces few long-term benefits for the colonizer. Therefore, it must be followed by strategies to persuade...
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