Medium Aevum

Bi-yearly journal contains articles, notes and review articles on a range of medieval linguistic and literary topics.

Articles from Vol. 63, No. 2, Fall

Allegorical Buildings in Mediaeval Literature
The landscape of mediaeval allegory is rich in architecture -- edifices such as the Tower of Truth, the Abbey of the Holy Ghost, the House of Fame, the Castle of Perseverance. What particularly interests me about the allegorical building is the problem...
An Addendum to Beowulf's Last Words
In an impressively documented and well-argued article, Joseph Harris has related the final speech of the hero Beowulf to the early Germanic genre of the death-song, a genre that Harris proceeds to describe in convincing detail.(1) Although Harris offers...
Enite's Dominion over the Horses: Notes on the Coalescence of Platonic and Hagiographic Elements in an Episode from Hartmann's 'Erec.' (Hartmann Von Aue)
It is generally agreed that interpolations, excursuses and amplifications of source material by a later adapter warrant close examination as a guide to the adapter's -- and, frequently, the original author's -- interpretative aims. It sometimes transpires...
Patience in Adversity: The Courtly Lover and Job in Machaut's Motets 2 and 3
Guillaume de Machaut has long been recognized for his intellectualization of love poetry. In his oeuvre, love is a rarefied and sublimated meditation, in which sexual consummation plays but a minor role.(1) Machaut's narrative poetry in particular...
'Proud Gallants and Popeholy Priests': The Context and Function of a Fifteenth-Century Satirical Poem
The 'gallant' is a late mediaeval villain whose appearance and offences are well known to readers of moral and satirical literature. He is thought to be first named in England in the late fourteenth-century satirical poem 'On the Times'.(1) This first...
Reading the Spaces: Pictorial Intentions in the Thornton MSS, Lincoln Cathedral MS 91, and BL MS Add. 31042
Manuscripts containing Middle English narrative texts which have been provided with programmes of illustration are comparatively rare.(1) Very few vernacular biblical narratives, for example, have picture cycles; nor do most English romances. It is...
The Metrics of Ausias March in a European Context
Of the 128 poems attributed to Ausias March (1397--1459) all but three are entirely in lines of ten syllables up to and including the last accented syllable. March was the first poet whose surviving work was composed in Catalan, as distinct from a...
What the Manuscripts Tell Us about the Parson's Tale
A consensus has long existed that the Parson's Tale and the Retraction were intended by Chaucer to bring The Canterbury Tales to an end. A superficial reading of the manuscripts would tend to confirm this consensus, and only one modern edition, the...