Medium Aevum

Bi-yearly journal contains articles, notes and review articles on a range of medieval linguistic and literary topics.

Articles from Vol. 72, No. 2, Fall

Dame Eleanor Hull: The Translator at Work
The fifteenth-century translator Dame Eleanor Hull was until recently virtually unknown. In 1987 I gave a paper on her at the first University of Cardiff conference on the theory and practice of translation in the Middle Ages; (1) in 1995 the Early...
Defamation as Political Contest during the Reign of Richard II
In 1379 and again in 1389 Richard II re-enacted the hundred-year-old scandalum magnatum statute, which Edward I had originally instituted in 1275 to prevent social discord by suppressing slanderous reports about the great men of the realm. (1) During...
Fecamp and Vernacular Historiography
Peter Damian-Grint's study of Anglo-Norman historiography, with its subtitle 'Inventing vernacular authority', (1) sets out to depict authorial consciousness and self-presentation in a series of pioneering chronicle texts. (2) At the end of his consideration...
In Folly Ripe, in Reason Rotten: The Flower and the Leaf and the 'Purgatory of Cruel Beauties'
Readers of the Middle English The Flower and the Leaf have long been fascinated by the poem's fusion of courtly and moral-didactic elements. The poem's first great enthusiast, John Dryden, found himself 'particularly pleas'd' both with the poem's 'Invention,...
Reading the Bible Sawles Warde and Ancrene Wisse
This essay is concerned with the ways in which two Early Middle English texts--Sawles Warde and Ancrene Wisse--deploy biblical citation and imagery, and with the traditions of biblical reading in which those deployments operate. The importance of Scripture...
Three Notes on Swords in Beowulf
'Beowulf', line 1459, 'ecg waes iren, atertanum fah' On this description of the sword Hrunting Klaeber comments, 'ater is perhaps used figuratively with regard to the acid employed in the process of (false) damascening. Another possibility is that...
Two Notes on Beowulf (with Glances at Vaf[THORN]ru[ETH]nismal, Blickling Homily 16, and Andreas, Lines 839-846)
'Beowulf line 1118b, 'Gu[eth]rinc astah' Editors and translators mostly take this verse to mean 'the warrior was laid on the pyre'; and as an analogue they cite Vaf[thorn]ru[eth]nismal, stanza 54, 'Hvat maelti O[eth]inn, a[eth]r a bal stigi, sjalfr...