The Mississippi Quarterly

The Mississippi Quarterly, subtitled The Journal of Southern Cultures, is a scholarly journal covering literature, the humanities and social sciences as they pertain to the Southern United States and its authors. Founded in 1948, Mississippi State University publishes The Mississippi Quarterly quarterly. Noel Polk is the Editor and Laura West is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 45, No. 4, Fall

Jimmy Carter in Context
Presidential style is a "presidents's habitual way of performing his three political roles," James David Barber has written: "rhetoric, personal relations, and homework."(2) Essentially, then, style is a president's manner of doing things. Jimmy Carter's...
Operation Dixie: Labor and Civil Rights in the Postwar South
One of the important underlying factors perpetuating Southern segregation was the perceived need of Southern employers for a low-wage labor force. Since the days of slavery, Southern and Northern-based employers in the region had understood that low...
The Higher Education of Black Women in the Contemporary South
The collegiate experience of African-American women in the contemporary South can be understood only in the context of regional history. Educational statistics and surveys of Southerners reveal the persistence of racial, regional, and gender differences...
The New Southern History
Every reader has at hand several sets of contrasting mental images that suggest how different the present-day South is from that of 1945. The bold skylines of Atlanta, Dallas, and Houston completely hide the cityscape of fifty years ago - what few...
The Segregated Farm Program in Poinsett County, Arkansas
By promoting mechanization and the rise of scientific agriculture, the federal government condoned and encouraged land engrossment and the concentration of land ownership in fewer white hands after World War II. Policies outlined by the Post-War Planning...
Virginius Dabney, John Temple Graves, and What Happened to Southern Liberalism
Before the second world war there were a number of Southern men and women reputed to be liberals who intrigued outsiders who thought that a patently backward and hidebound region could not produce its own critics and reformers. These Southern liberals...
Writing the History of Southern Music: A Review Essay
Although images of the romantic South have fired the imaginations of musicians and songwriters since the days of early black-face minstrelsy, the concept of "Southern Music" developed very slowly among scholars and popular writers. Certain forms of...