The Mississippi Quarterly

The Mississippi Quarterly, subtitled The Journal of Southern Cultures, is a scholarly journal covering literature, the humanities and social sciences as they pertain to the Southern United States and its authors. Founded in 1948, Mississippi State University publishes The Mississippi Quarterly quarterly. Noel Polk is the Editor and Laura West is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 57, No. 3, Summer

Cultural Studies' Misfit: White Trash Studies
IN DOROTHY ALLISON'S Bastard Out of Carolina (1992), the first-person narrator, a young girl called "Bone," describes 1950s rural poverty and what it means to be white trash. Bone lives in relatively stark conditions amid the culture of fifties affluence....
Kate Chopin's "A Pair of Silk Stockings": The Marital Burden and the Lure of Consumerism
IT IS NO NEWS THAT, FAILING TO FIND FULFILLMENT in their marriages, wives in Kate Chopin's fiction are sometimes driven in their desperation to suicide, adultery, or desertion. But in "A Pair of Silk Stockings," (1) a story too rarely discussed at...
Katherine Anne Porter's Miranda Stories: A Commentary on the Cultural Ideologies of Gender Identity
IN DISCUSSIONS OF THE TREATMENT OF WOMEN in Katherine Anne Porter's short stories, critics almost invariably examine the recurring character of Miranda. Typically, scholars such as William L. Nance and John Edward Hardy focus on how her grandmother's...
Magical Realism and the Mississippi Delta
Poets and beggars, musicians and prophets, warriors and scoundrels, all creatures of that unbridled reality, we have had to ask but little of imagination, for our crucial problem has been a lack of conventional means to render our lives believable....
"Prodjickin', or Mekin' a Present to Yo' Fam'ly": Rereading Empowerment in Thomas Nelson Page's Frame Narratives
GIVEN THE STABILITY OF SOUTHERN SOCIAL HIERARCHY that Thomas Nelson Page's writing asserts, it is strange that his first three published stories--"Marse Chan. A Tale of Old Virginia," "'Unc' Edinburg's Drowndin'.' A Plantation Echo," and "Meh Lady:...
Recognizing the Step: Rodney Jones and the Southern Speaking Poem
I know what it is to speak without knowing How it will be received, to take a number, To sway in a long-decadent tongue as on A hammock stretched between two pining Consonants, to audit the gross diphthong, To pray Do you know who this...
"Something Haphazard and Botched": Flannery O'Connor's Critique of the Visual in "Parker's Back"
"PARKER'S BACK," THE LAST SHORT STORY that Flannery O'Connor published during her lifetime, occupies a unique position in her career, not just by virtue of its belatedness but also for the relative gentleness of its ending. Gone are the shocking deaths,...
Variations on the Grotesque: From Poe's "The Black Cat" to Oates's "The White Cat"
IN HER "AFTERWORD" TO Haunted: Tales of the Grotesque (1994), Joyce Carol Oates discusses the concept of the grotesque, pointing out its allure, variety, and pervasiveness in art throughout the centuries. Significantly, she refers to Poe's influence...