The Mississippi Quarterly

The Mississippi Quarterly, subtitled The Journal of Southern Cultures, is a scholarly journal covering literature, the humanities and social sciences as they pertain to the Southern United States and its authors. Founded in 1948, Mississippi State University publishes The Mississippi Quarterly quarterly. Noel Polk is the Editor and Laura West is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 64, No. 1-2, Spring

"Abysses of Solitude": Chopin's Intertextuality with Flaubert
WELL-DOCUMENTED SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES IN PLOT AND MINOR details in Madame Bovary (1856) and The Awakening (1899) reflect differences in the most basic guiding visions of Gustave Flaubert and Kate Chopin, as manifest in their adherence to characteristics...
Choosing Sides during the Culture Wars of the 1920s, '30S, and '40S: Robert Penn Warren, the Weight of Agrarianism, and the Popular Audience
IN 1946, ROBERT PENN WARREN ACQUIRED HIS FIRST LITERARY AGENT, Helen Strauss, who was savvy, well-read, and admittedly aware of her client's professional reputation as a foremost figure among the Fugitives, New Critics, and Agrarians. Warren had just...
Chopin's Bildungsroman: Male Role Models in the Awakening
ASSERTIONS THAT THE AWAKENING IS AN EXAMINATION OF REGRESSION ARE commonplace in scholarship about the novel. Cynthia Griffin Wolff describes Edna Pontellier's suicide as "a stripping away of adulthood" (257), while others explain the role of Adele...
General Lee and the Siren: Allen Tate's Failed Biography
IN A FOLDER OF CORRESPONDENCE IN THE MANUSCRIPTS DIVISION OF Princeton's Firestone Library is a handwritten letter dated January 1967 to Allen Tate from a young man named James Oliver Tate, apparently no relation. After expressing his admiration for...
Ham Jones, North Carolina Backwoods Humorist, and the Art of "Democratic Elbow-Rubbing"
USUALLY SIGNING HIS HUMOROUS SKETCHES, "BY THE AUTHOR OF 'COUSIN Sally Dilliard'" ("Cousin Sally Dilliard" being his first, most popular, and most widely reprinted work), Ham Jones is not well known in the genre of Old Southwest humor. In "Ham Jones:...
"He Tossed His Line out Grimly": Barry Hannah's Literary Parables
IN A 1983 INTERVIEW, BARRY HANNAH DESCRIBED THE RELATIONSHIP between himself and his readers: I treat my readers better than a lot of writers do. I expect a hip, wise reader, and I don't have to tell that boy or girl everything. I expect some complicity...
Lillian B. Horace and the Literature of White Estrangement: Rediscovering an African American Intellectual of the Jim Crow Era
IN THE SPRING OF 2003 KAREN KOSSIE-CHERNYSHEV DISCOVERED THE DIARY and literature of Lillian Bertha Jones Horace at the Fort Worth Public Library in Fort Worth, Texas. It was an important moment not only because Horace is "Texas's earliest known African-American...
Man's Way and Woman's Way in the Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman
ERNEST J. GAINES'S 1971 THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MISS JANE PITTMAN interrogates the concept of fatherhood. Fatherhood with its multiple ramifications is here the "disease" from which the South suffers. In order to grasp the logic behind the disease, the...
Marsha Norman's Bi-Regional Vision in "Night, Mother
PLAYWRIGHT MARSHA NORMAN WAS BORN AND RAISED IN LOUISVILLE, Kentucky, a pleasant city along the Ohio River on the northern fringe of a Southern border state that did not join the Confederacy. Like other cities along this region-defining river, Louisville...
Mongrel Virginia: Ellen Glasgow's Barren Ground and the Curse of Tenancy
IN HER 1925 NOVEL BARREN GROUND, ELLEN GLASGOW CAMPAIGNS FOR A modernized South, rejecting plantation romance for rural realism, Southern womanhood for feminine sexual autonomy, aristocratic rule for Jeffersonian democracy, and plantation for industrialized...
Ovid, Christians, and Celts in the Epilogue of Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain
CHARLES FRAZIER HAS CAREFULLY SITUATED HIS NOVEL ABOUT AN American Civil War deserter within Greek and Latin classical literary traditions. Since its publication, Cold Mountain has all but universally been hailed as an "odyssey" by readers, critics,...
The Eros of Child and Cupid: Wendell Berry's Agrarian Engagement with Ecofeminism
IN THE LAND BEFORE HER, ANNETTE KOLODNY LAMENTS THAT AMERICA was settled under the "psychosexual dramas of men intent on possessing a virgin continent" (xiii). In response to Kolodny's seminal work, various authors have attempted to re-imagine American...
"We Pick at the Scabs": Writerly Persistence and Family Woundedness in Harry Crews's Blood Issue
IN 1989, THE ACTORS THEATRE OF LOUISVILLE OFFERED HARRY CREWS A $15,000 commission to write a full-length play. Typically, Crews saw the offer as a challenge, telling Erik Bledsoe, "since I'd never written a play, didn't know the first thing about...
White Woman, Indian Chief: Beatrice Ravenel and the Poetic Consciousness of Captivity
I run the gauntlet like a savage captive, Torn into ravellings Not by the spears of men but by the gold pins of the women! --"The Selfish Woman," Beatrice Witte Ravenel WHEN THE CHARLESTON POET BEATRICE WITTE RAVENEL PUBLISHED HER collection...