The Mississippi Quarterly

The Mississippi Quarterly, subtitled The Journal of Southern Cultures, is a scholarly journal covering literature, the humanities and social sciences as they pertain to the Southern United States and its authors. Founded in 1948, Mississippi State University publishes The Mississippi Quarterly quarterly. Noel Polk is the Editor and Laura West is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 46, No. 1, Winter

'A Curtain of Green': Eudora Welty's Auspicious Beginning
On November 7, 1941, Eudora Welty's first book, the short-story collection A Curtain of Green, was published by Doubleday, Doran, but not without considerable frustration and disappointment for its author. By the time the unknown Welty began sending...
Eliot's Modernism and Brook's New Criticism: Poetic and Religious Thinking
Emerging as the dominant critical methodology in America after World War II during a time of enormous expansion in the American university, New Criticism apparently exemplified a democratic pedagogy: any student could learn the skills to become a close...
Jack Butler: Poetry and Life, an Interview
Jack Butler was born in Alligator, Mississippi, in 1944. He lived primarily in Mississippi until 1964, when he moved to Missouri to attend college. He received degrees in English and mathematics from Central Missouri State College, after which he worked...
The 'Parent in the Percept' in 'The Last Gentleman.'
Walker Percy's The Last Gentleman (1966)(1) opens with this description: One fine day in early summer a young man lay thinking in Central Park. His head was propped on his jacket, which had been folded twice so that the lining was outermost,...
This Crooked Narrative Way
I think religion is dangerous. I really do. I think it can almost poison human relations. This idea ... of "community" is a kind of ancient theme as well. The ... mystical issue of just who your brothers and sisters really are. It occurs over and...
To Attend to One's Own Soul: Walker Percy and the Southern Cultural Tradition
In describing what it means for a novel to be Southern, Louis Rubin uses the term convergence, meaning by it, I think, the palpable, singular depth of experience and memory that makes a community - a Southern community - an influence on a writer.(1)...