The Mississippi Quarterly

The Mississippi Quarterly, subtitled The Journal of Southern Cultures, is a scholarly journal covering literature, the humanities and social sciences as they pertain to the Southern United States and its authors. Founded in 1948, Mississippi State University publishes The Mississippi Quarterly quarterly. Noel Polk is the Editor and Laura West is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 47, No. 3, Summer

'Absalom, Absalom!' and Faulkner's Erroneous Dating of the Haitian Revolution
In 1791 slaves revolted on San Domingo: "the world's richest colony" was overrun in a black revolution, whose forces "defeated the Spanish; inflicted a defeat of unprecedented proportions on the British, and then made their country the graveyard of Napoleon's...
Cross-Dressing in Yoknapatawpha County
Many of Faulkner's women characters are described by critics, and by Faulkner himself, as masculinized. Leading-edge gender theorists such as Judith Butler(1) argue that gender is no more than a cultural construct--that is, that categories of masculine...
Faulknerian Tragedy: The Example of 'As I Lay Dying.' (Special Issue: William Faulkner)
... the printed word that lasts over centuries has for its skeleton tragedy or despair. William Faulkner(1) Warwick Wadlington's Reading Faulknerian Tragedy (1987) reminds us that Faulkner's greatest works are formal tragedies. Faulknerian...
Gender and Authorial Limitation in Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily." (Special Issue: William Faulkner)
Faulkner's extensive authorial power in "A Rose for Emily" looms evident in the design of a large Southern gothic house, in the outline of three complex generations of a Southern community, and in the development of a plot that dutifully weaves and unweaves...
The Abjection of Addie and Other Myths of the Maternal in 'As I Lay Dying.' (Special Issue: William Faulkner)
In many ways William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying exemplifies what Susan Cole has called the paradox of mourning.(1) Cole argues that ritual tragedies reveal both reverence and revulsion towards the newly dead person, becoming "performance[s] of ambivalence...
The Corruption in Looking: William Faulkner's 'Sanctuary' as a 'Detect'ive Novel
Unhappy swimming in the fervor of summer and/or the fertility of the country comprising Blithedale, Coverdale, the removed narrator of Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Blithedale Romance, returns to the city. There, through a hotel window, Coverdale can more...
The Riddle of 'Absalom, Absalom!': Looking at the Wrong Blackbird?
At the center of Absalom, Absalom! there is a known fact, like a real stone enduring centuries of words: in 1865 a man named Henry Sutpen, the son of Thomas Sutpen and Ellen Coldfield, killed a man named Charles Bon.(1) Taken out of its context...