Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 133, No. 25, June 21

Amazon's Pet Projects: Start-Ups Jump When the Online Giant Comes Calling
Three months ago, the old Hercules Rubber plant in San Francisco's warehouse district was a cluttered, decaying mess. The mannequins and sewing machines of a children's garment company littered the floor, while 30-year-old paint peeled off the mammoth...
An Overdue 'Thank You' to My Dad: Media Portrayals of Fathers Are Often So Negative That We Forget to Pay Tribute to the Many Good Ones
I stepped from my father's red Ford Probe outside the train station. Turning around to wave, I saw him tapping his fingers on the steering wheel as he sang to the radio. He wore his plaid wool, made-in-Ireland hat with the button on top, his favorite...
A Phone That Catches the Net, Anime Mania, Digital Music Jukeboxes Duke It out, How Much Spam Can You Stand?
While highly wired professionals lust for the Palm VII, everyone else's favorite wireless device is the mobile phone. Motorola's new i1000plus, with service from Nextel ($299; 800-639-8359), gives you e-mail and specific Web services like news and...
At MTV, Peace, Love and a Hippie Named Jim, Unwedded Bliss, Austin's Dance Partner, Gunning for the NBA
There was a lot of lovin' going on at last week's MTV Movie Awards. Ben Affleck locked lips with director Kevin Smith ("Dude, you've got to brush"), Ricky Martin gave Catherine Zeta-Jones a showy smooch and Courtney Love threatened to "jump" James...
Beware the Unruly Sun: Melanoma Strikes Americans at Twice the Rate Today as It Did Two Decades Ago. How to Guard against This Deadly Skin Cancer
Beware the Unruly Sun Melanoma strikes Americans at twice the rate today as it did two decades ago. How to guard against this deadly skin cancer. By Claudia Kalb The summer sun. It warms the sand and the soul. But as Kathleen Black will remind...
Bush's Record: The World According to 'W'
THE GUBERNATORIAL RECORD The Texas governor's office is constitutionally weak, but Bush has, in his five years, had a strong but controversial run. Taxes: His '97 plan to slash property taxes while hiking other rates was his biggest gambit--and...
Financial Exposure, Career in Brief: A Tawdry Tale of Sex, Race and Money at Morgan Stanley Appalls-And Entertains-Wall Street
Shortly after Easter 1998 a funny thing happened at the offices of one of Wall Street's great investment-banking firms. In the gleaming tower that's home to Morgan Stanley Dean Witter, amid the spreadsheets and debentures that only an M.B.A. could...
Going Ape for an Icon: Why Tarzan Has Reigned for Almost a Century
I read "Tarzan of the Apes" for the first time a couple of years ago, and I couldn't get over how good it was. OK, it's not perfect. Cliches abound. Author Edgar Rice Burroughs's racism, appalling precisely because it is so casual, stains an otherwise...
HEALTH NOTES, Take Two Cups and Call Me in the Morning, Hard on the Heart, the Squeeze Play, 'A Great New Option'
And you thought those iced cappuccinos were a guilty pleasure. It turns out that coffee reduces the risk of painful gallstones. Harvard researchers tracked diet and illness among 46,000 men over 10 years. Those who drank two to three cups a day--no...
Here Comes the Son: Already Miles Ahead, but with Miles Still to Go, George W. Bush Opens His Campaign to Reclaim the White House. but to Follow in His Father's Footsteps, He Will Have to Prove He's More Than Just a Famous Name
George Walker Bush can't sit still. Hosting a lunch at the Texas governor's mansion in Austin, he taps his foot under the table like a schoolboy waiting for recess. He is 52 years old (53 next month), yet he hums with the kind of energy that led him...
'He's Been through a Lot': A Proud Father Talks about How His Son's Been Tested
The morning after his parachute jump last week ("It was heaven," he said), former president George Bush spoke to NEWSWEEK's Ann McDaniel and Jon Meacham. Excerpts: NEWSWEEK: Do you give Governor Bush advice? BUSH: No, just there as a dad, really....
Hey, Remember Me? I'm Al Gore., Wicked Worm Eats Files, Pick Knicks, Whip GOPs, They All Got Game-But Who's Got Next?, What I Bought This Summer, 'It's O.J. Week', A Break in the Murder Case?, Let's Hope It Outlasts Leg Warmers, Farewell, Bones, Family Business, Talkin' the Talk
When Al Gore makes it official this week--yes, he's running for president--his kickoff in Carthage, Tenn., set to country music, will be worthy of fellow front runner and putative good ole boy George W. Bush. And like Bush earlier this month, Gore...
How Good Is Your Plan? Retirement Calculators Tell You How Much to Save, but Not Whether It Will Be Enough
You say you have a retirement plan? a broker or planner ran your financials through a computer and told you how much you ought to save? Or maybe you did your own plan, using one of the automatic calculators on the Web. You found that if you invest...
How We'd Make Our Internet Millions: Forget C. Everett Koop and Lou Dobbs. What about Us? We Put It on the Web, We Take It to Wall Street. We Just Need a Brand Name
Ok, now it's official. not only are all sorts of young people making and chasing Internet fortunes, but even old and middle-aged guys are getting into the act. Take last week. C. Everett Koop, former U.S. surgeon general, became a multimillionaire...
'I Am a Blessed Person': The Governor on What Got Him Here-And What's Next
Before heading out on his first presidential campaign trip, Texas Gov. George W. Bush spoke with NEWSWEEK's Howard Fineman. Excerpts: FINEMAN: You're in a remarkable situation. You weren't even in elective office five years ago, and now here you...
Is It Payback Time for Ethnic Cleansing? Why the Latest Refugees from Kosovo Are Serbs
Slobodan Milosevic wanted an ethnically pure Kosovo. He's now likely to see one--but it will be ethnically Albanian, not Serb. As NATO troops moved into the province last week, local Serbs streamed out. In fact, steady numbers have been leaving throughout...
Keeping Her Own Score: The World Cup Will Show Everyone How Good Mia Hamm Is. Why Can't She See It?
In soccer circles, the story has been told and retold so often that it has taken on Arthurian, sword-in-the-stone dimensions. How in the mid-'80s Anson Dorrance, then coach of the U.S. women's national team, ventured south to scout a 14-year-old Texas...
Mase on a Mission: A Rap Superstar Talks about Puffy and the Lord
Mason Betha, better known as Mase, first emerged in 1997 as the signature bad boy for Sean (Puffy) Combs's Bad Boy empire: amoral, materialistic and a lot of fun. His debut album, "Harlem World," an ode to the pleasure principle, sold more than 3 million...
Microsoft's Sun Burn: Scott McNealy Has Some Ideas on the Antitrust Trial
Scott McNealy, chairman of Sun Microsystems and chief nemesis of Microsoft, likes to open speeches with a top 10 list--often about the Redmond software giant. What is one of his "top 10 signs you could be a monopolist"? Quips McNealy: "Janet Reno has...
Perspectives
"Old guys can still do stuff, and you might as well go for it... I feel like a spring colt." Former president George Bush, after sky-diving to mark his 75th birthday "I can report to the American people that we have achieved a victory for a safer...
Police Must Be Held Accountable: After the New York Brutality Trials, One Top Cop Says It's Time to Demand More from Our Police-But We Also Have to Be Willing to Pay for It
Robert Volpe says his son, Justin, a New York police officer, cracked like a soldier in combat might do when he beat Haitian immigrant Abner Louima and then sodomized him with a stick. "It was war outside that night," he said. Now that New York's brutality...
Republicans, Just Waiting: Less Than Five Years after the Earthquake Election of 1994, Process Trumps Passion on the Hill
Republicans in the House of Representatives are putting a cheerful interpretation on events, in the manner of the communique issued during the Spanish Civil War: "The advance was continued all day without any ground being lost." Their leader, Speaker...
Sainthood for a Pope? John XXIII Is Headed for Beatification in 2000
In the last 900 years, the Roman Catholic Church has found only three popes worthy of veneration as saints. As part of the church's millennial celebration next year, however, John Paul II would like to beatify three 20th- century popes, the last step...
Science for Girls Only: At This Start-Up in the Heart of Silicon Valley, a Class of Pioneers Learns to Make All the Right Connections
The subject of the day is electrical circuits, and the sixth graders are tinkering intently with wires and batteries. But the real subjects of this experiment are the students themselves, a pioneer class of 35 who have enrolled since last September...
Taxing Times for Robertson: The Christian Coalition, Already in Decline, Loses an IRS Battle
When Pat Robertson founded the Christian Coaliton in 1989, he boasted he would create a powerful new voting bloc that would elect "pro-family" lawmakers to Congress. By the early '90s the coalition had become an undeniable force, with phone banks and...
The Garage That Ate Tucson: If You Don't Know, Your Neighbor Will: Two-Car Is Too Small
Bob and Maria Alexander have their own end-of-century American dream. It takes the earthly form of a four-car garage. Bob, 41, owner of a clothing company, drives a sports car that once fit neatly beside his wife's wagon in their two-car garage in...
The Greatest Expectation: To Win, Bush Must Bend the GOP to His Will, Not the Other Way around. We're Waiting
"That's prejudice," my 10-year-old said as she watched the news story on TV, and I couldn't disagree. For nearly two years, Senate Republicans have blocked the nomination of philanthropist James Hormel to be ambassador to Luxembourg for a simple and...
The Road to Peace: With Cheers from Jubilant Albanians, NATO Troops Roll into Kosovo-And a Surprise Russian Move Threatens to Spoil the Party
They began gathering early Friday evening, as the sun set on a sweltering day in the green canyons of Macedonia. Hundreds of Kosovar Albanian men, many of them shirtless, and skinny from 10 weeks at Stankovic refugee camp, lined up expectantly at the...
They're Havin' a Heat Wave: HBO Goes Where the Big Networks Fear to Tread-And Rules the Summer
Did you see that "Sopranos" episode where Tony kills the rat? Brilliant. He slips away from touring colleges with his daughter to strangle a former colleague who sang to the Feds--talk about balancing work and family. Or how about the "Sex and the...