Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 135, No. 8, February 21

A Disease's Devastating Toll
Our Jan. 31 cover story on Alzheimer's disease elicited an outpouring of appreciation from readers, many of whom shared their family experiences. "Thank you for an enlightening article that puts a face on the most devastating disease a family can endure,"...
Al Gore's 'Men of Zeal': Looking to November, the Veep Gears Up His 'Oppo'
Al Gore had the look of a candidate no longer fighting for his political life last week. He took the stage at New York's Avery Fisher Hall to narrate Aaron Copland's "Lincoln Portrait," accompanied by the American Symphony Orchestra. In Los Angeles,...
Calm before the Crash: There Was No Hint of Disaster in What Flight 261's Pilots Said, and Now the Focus Is on What They Did
The pilots, calm and composed, were seemingly unaware of the tragedy ahead. In the minutes before Alaska Airlines Flight 261 plunged into the ocean off Los Angeles, the cockpit crew insisted everything aboard was under control, according to sources...
Critical Moment
Our Opinionated Guide from to one star to five stars MOVIES The Cup Soccer mania hits the young novices in a Buddhist monastery, who scheme to watch the World Cup on TV. This Bhutanese movie, cast with real monks, is a low-key charmer. (3 stars)D.A....
Dixie Donnybrook: It's Down and Dirty in South Carolina. His Back to the Wall, Bush Is Pulling No Punches While McCain-With an Eye toward Preserving His Good-Guy Image-Tries to Take the High Road. the Race to Win Saturday's Critical Primary, and Beyond
As a POW, John McCain learned a profound lesson: a carrot in your soup doesn't mean you're going home. On the "Straight Talk Express," McCain usually is a jovial flyboy. But he turned somber in South Carolina last week as he recited a parable of ruined...
Holes in the Net: The Web Assaults Show How the Qualities That Make the Net Work Leave It Vulnerable. What to Worry about Next
It all seemed so scary. There was Attorney General Janet Reno, flanked by FBI brass and a clutch of cyber white hats, assuring the world that the Feds were hard on the trail of the most debilitating vandalism the Net has seen in years. But the even...
Hunting the Hackers: In a Flash, Some of the Giants of E-Commerce Were Shut Down by a Torrent of Bits Sent by Hostile Invaders. the Attacks Were a Wake-Up Call to the Fragility of the Net and Kicked off a Worldwide Dragnet in Search of the Cyberperps
Hell week for e-commerce began at just about latte time last Monday morning. At around 10:20 a.m. Pacific, the brisk pace of the Yahoo portal--a Gladstone bag of digital services including e-mail, news, fantasy sports leagues and a renowned Web directory--slowed...
'I Have Made Mistakes': Europe's Most Famous Far-Right Politician on Nazis, Foreigners-And His Controversial Family Estate
While his freedom party loyalists settled into their new government posts in Vienna last week, Jorg Haider returned to Carinthia, the mountainous home province in southern Austria where he is the governor. He spoke with NEWSWEEK's Joshua Hammer and...
Inside the Secret Cyberwar: Facing Unseen Enemies, the Feds Try to Stay a Step Ahead
A little after 7 p.m. Eastern standard time on Jan. 24, nearly half the computing power in the world went dead. The top secret National Security Agency's massive array of supercomputers--which crunch information from America's spy satellites and global...
It's Home Suite Hotel: Five-Star Living-In the Privacy of Your Own House
Peter Greenberg knows hotels. The travel editor of NBC's "Today" show (and a former NEWSWEEK correspondent), Greenberg logs 400,000 air miles a year and spends many months--up to eight a year--living away from home. Maybe too many. He's developed such...
It's Time I Shed My Ex-Convict Status: For 30 Years I've Lived a Good Life-So Why Should I Have to Tell a Potential Employer about My Past?
Thirty years ago I decided to drastically turn my life around. With a state-issued olive suit on my back, a high-school equivalency diploma and $40 travel money in my pocket, I became an ex-convict. I had done my time--almost five years in all--and...
Leonardo Misses the Wave: 'The Beach' Is Inviting, but the Water's Mighty Shallow
A friend who'd seen a trailer for "The Beach" described it, only half joking, as a cross between "The Blue Lagoon" and "Lord of the Flies." It's easy enough to see why Danny Boyle's movie would evoke such analogies. Here are nubile young Westerners...
Life in the Fastest Lane: Race-Drivers' School Is Three Days of Accelerated Fear-And Fun
Even as a kid growing up in Los Angeles, I liked cars. In first grade, when my friend Jana brought over her new black and pink patent-leather Barbie wardrobe, stuffed full of evening gowns and handbags, I asked her which kind of car she thought Barbie...
Malcom Lands on Top: Six Weeks into Its Run, 'Malcolm in the Middle' Is Making Sitcom History. Who Knew Success Would Look This Quirky?
Eileen Boomer would like to set the record straight about the sitcom based on her family, "Malcolm in the Middle." For one thing, she says she did not shave her husband's hairy body in the kitchen. "Can you imagine! I was a little more concerned about...
Mothers and Sons: As the Death Toll Mounts in Chechnya, Russian Parents Are Fighting to Rescue Their Boys from a Brutal War. the Story of One Determined Woman
Yekaterina Zhadova sensed trouble late last summer. Her son Nikolai, 19, hadn't written for more than a month. Drafted in June 1998, he had sent frequent letters from an Army base not far from his home in Arzamas, a city about 250 miles east of Moscow....
Philadelphia in 2000: Like 1948? McCain May Think That He, like Truman, Can Win without the Help of Elements of His Party
Although the democratic convention in Los Angeles is still six months away, it is not too soon to start yawning. But when Republicans convene in Philadelphia, brotherly love may be as scarce as it was when last a party convention was held there. ...
Senator Hothead: In the Cloakroom, John McCain Won't Suffer Fools and Lets Them Know It. How He Plays by the Washington Rules-And How He Doesn't
Of the 55 republicans in the U.S. Senate, only four support John McCain for president. Most of the rest--39 in all, with two more signing on last week--back George W. Bush. Why can't McCain win the votes of his own colleagues? To explain, a Republican...
'The Body' Slams His Party: Ventura Storms out, Leaving Buchanan as the Front Runner in a Deeply Divided Reform Movement. Inside the Feud
Pat Buchanan was feeling mischievous. His nemesis Jesse Ventura had just quit the Reform Party, Buchanan was poised to get control, and he'd spent an hour railing against foreign powers in a suburban Chicago banquet hall. ("I'd tell the Chinese: 'If...
The Gray Lady Goes Dot-Com: The August New York Times Wants to Sell Investors a Stake in Its Money-Losing Web Sites. Will Investors Subscribe?
One of the guiding principles of business, as in sports, is that it's better to attack your competitors than to wait until you're attacked. Which explains why The New York Times Co., owner of the eponymous newspaper, wants to sell investors a stake...
The New Urban Battlefield: U.S. Troops Don't Do Cities. but Someday They'll Have To
The battle of Grozny was long and bloody--for Russian attackers as well as the Chechen defenders. But you won't see any condescending head-wagging in the U.S. military. As one senior Pentagon official said last week, "I'm not so sure that we'd do a...
The Old Order Closes Ranks: Why Republicans Can't See That McCain's Reform Bid Is Their Best Chance of Beating Gore
At an internet start-up in Michigan last week, a voter asked John McCain why he had changed his mind after 1996 and decided to run for president. McCain deadpanned: "I was sitting in a room and Angela Lansbury turned over a Queen of Diamonds." This...
Thou Shalt Not Smear: Rudy and Hillary Set off a Ruckus over Religion
As a republican moderate who supports abortion, gay rights and gun control, New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani has to look hard for ways to woo the right wing. A fund-raising letter he sent out last October is a perfect case in point. In it, Giuliani attacked...
Who Governs? Maybe Nobody. Government Is Slowly Getting Bigger Because, Paradoxically, We Think It's Getting Smaller
You recall Clinton's 1996 State of the Union Address, when he declared that "the era of big government is over." The president knew this wasn't true and--practically speaking--couldn't become true. For decades, federal spending had amounted to about...
Why Asian Guys Are on a Roll: Asian-American Men Were Told for Many Years by Their Own Community to Be Dutiful Sons
After getting divorced from an "All-American guy" she'd been with for 10 years, 31-year-old publicist Lisa Rosevear was ready for something new. She came up with a list of what she wanted in a man: smart, genuine, respectful. Adding it up, it occurred...
Why the Market Will Rule: With Money at Stake, E-Businesses Will Fix This Glitch
Our nation's computer system is insecure and vulnerable to collapse. Because of this, the world's financial system will melt down, nuclear-weapons systems will be compromised, the stock market will plummet, planes will fall from the sky, water-treatment...