Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 135, No. 11, March 13

A Millionaire Moment: The Publishing Industry, Eying Dollar Signs, Is Pumping out Feel-Good Tomes on Building a Stash
Here's a get-rich-quick tip: if you want to become a millionaire, perhaps you should consider writing a book about millionaires. After all, millionaire mania has become the "Harry Potter" of personal-finance publishing. The just-released "The Millionaire...
A Trash-Talking Crusader: Move over, Norma Rae. Roberts Fires Up 'Erin Brockovich.'
Julia Roberts is flat-out terrific in "Erin Brockovich." She's playing a brash, tenacious, trash-talking heroine unlike any she's played before, and she's utterly convincing in the part. At the same time you never forget you're watching Julia Roberts,...
A Wall St. Squeeze Play: With a Planned Junk-Bond Offering, the Yanks' George Steinbrenner Stands to Pocket a Fortune
It's spring training--that hopeful time of year when Major League Baseball teams debark to warm climates to prepare for the upcoming season. Optimism reigns, and owners, fans and sports journalists while away the hours by whining about how much money...
Brother in the Background: Jeb Bush's Florida Controversy Could Spell Trouble for W
Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and his big brother, George W, like to share. That includes even the lines they use to distance themselves from their famous parents. "I'm not running because I'm the son of George and Barbara Bush, but because I'm the father...
Critical Moment
Our Opinionated Guide from to (1 star) to (5 stars) MOVIES Beautiful People. A crowded canvas of characters--Serbs, Muslims, skinheads, BBC reporters and aristocrats--collide in London in this startling black comedy about the fallout from the...
Did Kayla Have to Die? after a 6-Year-Old Kills His Classmate, the Search for Answers Raises Fears about Parenting and Guns. Untangling the Troubled Life of a Little Boy
The father knew it even before he was told. When a fellow inmate informed Dedric Darnell Owens that there had been a shooting at his son's school, "a cold, sickening feeling came over me," Owens later told the local county sheriff, Bob Pickell. "I...
Erin Fights Goliath: The 'Real' Erin Brockovich Returns for Another Round against a California Utilities Giant
Erin Brockovich is a dyslexic legal investigator with no technical expertise. So she tends to trust her gut. In 1992, her gut told her that something at Pacific Gas and Electric's Hinkley Compressor Station was making folks in that California desert...
For Sale by Owner? Good Company, Slightly Used. Seagram CEO Edgar Bronfman Is Shopping His Family's Company, Worried That It Is Too Small to Play Alone in the Post-Time Warner-AOL World
Tall, lean and confident, Seagram CEO Edgar Bronfman Jr. bounds onto a ballroom stage at the Sheraton Hotel in New York last week. Although he has a cold, he's there to deliver a speech on the prospects of the music business in the wired world. He...
From Sarin to Software: A Doomsday Cult's Secret Weapon: High Tech
The M Group served some of the giants of Japanese industry and government. Honda contracted work to the software developer, as did NTT, the telephone monopoly. So did the Defense Agency, Japan's Pentagon. No one had any complaints--until last week,...
Get Ready for a New Air War: The Idea Is to Destroy Your Opponent before He's Even Nominated
Hacks are hacks, but let's be fair: the folks who run political parties have sophisticated tastes. At GOP headquarters, foreign films are the rage. Their favorite: a documentary in Mandarin Chinese showing Al Gore at the Buddhist-temple fund-raiser...
Inside the Real Gun Battle: Expect Changes from the Gunmakers, Not the Government
It's not exactly detente, but it's progress nonetheless. This week, for the first time, National Rifle Association chief Charlton Heston and Jim Brady, founder of Handgun Control, will share a stage in Denver to support Project Exile, the NRA program...
I Wonder: Was It Me or Was It My Sari? Strangers Smiled and Indian Cabbies Raced to Pick Me Up-But after a Month, I Was Ready for My Khakis
A sari for a month. It shouldn't have been a big deal but it was. After all, I had grown up around sari-clad women in India. My mother even slept in one. In India, saris are adult attire. After I turned 18, I occasionally wore a sari for weddings...
Kids and Guns: What Parents Can Do
Gun violence is scary, and there's no way to guarantee that your kid will be 100 percent safe. But you can significantly improve the odds. Here's some advice: Talk to your children about guns and violence. Explain that weapons are not toys and that...
Learning Right from Wrong: The Fragile Steps toward a Child's Understanding That Lying, Stealing, Cheating and Hurting Are out of Bounds
To the legal system, the answer is clear: children have the requisite moral sense--the ability to tell right from wrong--by age 7 to 15, depending on which state they live in, and so can be held responsible for their actions. The Roman Catholic Church...
Life under the Glass Ceiling: Not Every Woman in Hollywood Has Broken Through
Now that Julia's the first actress to muscle her way into the $20 million boys' club, the big question is this: are women behind the scenes in Hollywood getting the same treatment as men? The signs look good. Women run three of the seven major Hollywood...
Perspectives
"He was basically living in hell." Genesee County, Mich., Sheriff Robert Pickell, on the troubled home life of the first grader who shot and killed another 6-year-old at Theo J. Buell Elementary School "I think tomorrow will probably be the same...
Pretty, Witty and Gay? Well, Maybe Not Entirely
Rupert Everett is making a habit of playing a straight woman's dream best friend. Playing more or less the same gay role in "The Next Best Thing" he did in "My Best Friend's Wedding," Everett once again waltzes away with the picture. But this time...
Skill the Umpire!
If you've got $2,300 and five weeks to spare, try the Harry Wendelstedt School for Umpires. A few top grads win spots in rookie ball; some even work their way to the majors. PERI spent a few days sitting in. Making the Calls The Wendelstedt School's...
The 20 Million Dollar Woman: At 32, Julia Roberts Is the Most Powerful-And the Highest-Paid-Actress in Hollywood. the Star of the Triumphant New Movie 'Erin Brockovich' Talks about the View from the Top
The first time you met her she was 21 and had a real mouth on her. She smoked. She swore. She kept grabbing your arm when she talked. You asked if she'd left Georgia because she wanted to be an actress, and she said, "Well, and I didn't want to stay...
The Best High Schools: Challenging Kids by Encouraging Them to Take Tough High-School Courses Produces Students Who Can Succeed Later in College
Nick Freeman, an honor-roll student at Clayton A. Bouton High School in the hilly Albany suburb of Voorheesville, N.Y., had nearly a 90 average in social studies and English. Last spring a counselor urged him to sign up for Advanced Placement (AP)...
The Bushed and the Bored: The Usual Party Choices Will Likely Battle It out --and Millions of 'Indie' Voters Will Tune Out
If present trends continue (and they often don't), get ready for post-party depression--that empty feeling on waking up to find the thrill is gone. Reporters aren't the only ones reluctant to reconcile themselves to the dreary and predictable knife...
The Great Amazon Patent Debate: The E-Commerce King Says It Owns the 'Single Click' Process. Webheads Say It Should Be Shared
You might think that Jeff Bezos would be on top of the world. The company he founded, Amazon.com, is sitting pretty on top of the e-commerce food chain. In an age consumed with millionaires, his stash can be measured in billions. His braying laugh...
The Long Shadow of Amadou Diallo: The New York Cops on Trial for Murder Got Some Lucky Breaks-And Not Just from the Racially Mixed Jury That Acquitted Them
Laws, sausage and criminal justice. If you value them, don't watch them being made; you are doomed to disenchantment. Last week, in the aftermath of the Amadou Diallo case, disillusionment bubbled over, fueling angry outbursts and demonstrations in...
The Lost Billions: The Inside Story of the Hunt-From Lagos to New York to Geneva-For an African Dictator's Stolen Loot
The death of Gen. Sani Abacha was, by any standard, a sordid affair. As president of Nigeria, the oil-rich country that dominates West Africa, Abacha could satisfy his every desire. He could order his critics jailed or executed. He could demand a truckload...
The Problem of the Color Line: Here's the Riddle: Why Is Our Most Important Issue the One No One Really Wants to Talk About?
Here's a riddle: why was the internationally known Princeton professor stopped for driving too slowly on a street where the speed limit was 25 miles per hour? How come a Maryland state trooper demanded to search the car of a lawyer who graduated from...
'There Is More We Can Do': Clinton's Challenge to Gunmakers, Congress and Parents
After last week's deadly shootings, President Clinton provided written answers to questions from NEWSWEEK's Debra Rosenberg and Matt Bai. Excerpts: NEWSWEEK: Why not register all guns? CLINTON: We have licenses for driving and for hunting; I...
The Web's Best Friends: Software Tools That Fetch Info from the Internet and Bring It to You-Often before You Even Ask
Wouldn't it be great if the Web knew what you were looking for and just served it up, right there on your screen? For those of us accustomed to the keyword-and-search routine, it sounds nearly impossible. But that's precisely what a handful of companies...
Tracking Bin Laden: A Talk with a Key Suspect in an Anti-American Plot
The Kafkafa security prison sits high on a summit among the craggy hills of northern Jordan. It's visiting hour, and Khalil Deek is smiling broadly through an iron-mesh screen dividing prisoners from their families. "Thank you for taking an interest...
Up with the Downbeat: Charged by Their Prodigal Drummer's Return, the Smashing Pumpkins Are (Almost) Back on Track
For Smashing Pumpkins front-man Billy Corgan, the recording studio is no place to be generous. He alone writes the songs. There is no sharing. His bandmates dutifully record their parts, then Corgan promptly re-records them. But credit the guy for...
Who Will Be Citi's Last Banker Left Standing? Reed's Exit Leaves Two Big Shots, but No Heir
From the start, there was betting on how long the partnership could last. John Reed himself upped the ante with characteristically blunt comments about the difficulties of sharing the CEO's job at financial-services giant Citigroup, formed in 1998...
Wireless Web Grab: The Net's Powers Fight for the Cellular Frontier
The annual conference of the Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association used to be a drab, button-down affair. Regulators and phone execs wearing bad ties would lecture attendees on issues like radio-spectrum auctions and the benefits of analog...
Worrying about Web Attacks
Readers of our Feb. 21 cover story, "Hijacking the Net," were deeply concerned about privacy and safety on the Internet. "We must give hackers lengthy jail sentences and stiff fines," declared one. Others were less alarmed. "We all need to chill out...