Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 23

After Slobo, Cheers and Fears as a New Day Dawns: Office by Office, Factory by Factory and School by School, Freedom Is Beginning to Take Root in Serbia. A Tale of One City
The ax fell on Veselin Petrovic at noon last Thursday. A Socialist Party loyalist who ran the public-health department in the town of Leskovac for six years, Petrovic was the kind of boss who thrived in Slobodan Milosevic's Serbia. His employees say...
A Maverick Gets His Moment: How the Debates Gave Ralph Nader a Boost
Ralph Nader would have given his rumpled gray suit to be included in last week's debate in Winston-Salem, N.C. Instead, the Green Party candidate gnawed pizza and scribbled on a legal pad as he watched the debate in the cluttered old Victorian house...
A New Fight for Arab Votes: Their Support Could Make the Difference in Close States
Not long into last week's debate, George W. Bush made a brief, cryptic remark in response to a question about racial discrimination. "Arab-Americans are racially profiled in what's called 'secret evidence'," he said. "People are stopped, and we got...
A Sneak Attack: Death at Sea: Terrorist Bombers Blast a Navy Destroyer in Far-Off Yemen. the Anatomy of an Assault-And the Hunt for Who's Responsible
From the bridge of the destroyer USS Cole, the flyblown port of Aden must have seemed an innocuous if somewhat exotic place, a sprawl of scruffy buildings and wharves nestled in a basin of volcanic hills. Schooners and dhows, cargo vessels and warships...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY Old-Style Film With a Digital Touch Kodak estimates that 40 percent of cameras are sold during the holiday season. That's why the company is rushing to get 30,000 units of its new Advantix Preview camera ($299) into stores by mid-November....
Down on the Body Farm: The Only Place on Earth Dedicated to Studying Human Decay in Order to Advance the Science of Crime Busting
The air smells sickeningly sweet, with honeysuckle and death. The Body Farm--the only place in the world where corpses rot in the open air to advance human knowledge--sits on a wooded hillside an easy three-minute stroll from the University of Tennessee...
Fare Rage: With Ticket Prices Soaring, Businesses Are Struggling to Cut Travel Expenses
It's pretty easy to get from Cincinnati to San Francisco--there's a direct flight that takes about five hours. But for Walter Solomon, chief executive of an Internet start-up called ConnectMail, the trip lasts a bit longer. From his Cincinnati home,...
He's Singing in the Ring: Boxing Champ Oscar De la Hoya Has the Face of a Choirboy. Does He Have the Voice of One, Too?
It's not enough that Oscar De La Hoya won the world welterweight championship six times and an Olympic gold medal in 1992. Or that the dairy industry's cutest milk-mustache model was the only presenter at last month's Latin Grammys to inspire louder...
IIs the PC Boom over? Now That the Majority of Households Own Personal Computers, Sales Growth Is Starting to Slow Down
It was strangely quiet in the PC and laptop aisles of the Union Square CompUSA in San Francisco last week. One patron was playing solitaire on a $2,600 Sony VAIO desktop. A few others were watching "Terminator 2" on a flashy flat-panel screen. No one...
'Israel Is Here to Stay': Netanyahu Talks about Arafat, Peace and Politics
One Israeli politician in particular is calculating the domestic effects of Arab-Jewish tensions. Polls show that, if an election were called now, former prime minister Benjamin (Bibi) Netanyahu would defeat the man he lost to in 1999, Ehud Barak....
It Was the Last Time We Were Together: Last Year I Returned to the Italian Village Where My Family and I Hid from the Nazis. This Is My Story
For years I had been dreaming of going back to the little town of Zimone, Italy, to revisit the place where, in 1944, my parents, my brother Emanuel and I were an intact family for the last time. My dream was about to become a reality. My daughter,...
'I Will Never Lose Hope': What's at Stake in the Mideast Summit-And beyond. A Frank Talk with Israel's Leader
After two weeks of bloody turmoil, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak agreed to attend a Middle East peace summit with President Clinton and Yasir Arafat. However, speaking to NEWSWEEK's Lally Weymouth on the eve of his departure for the Egyptian resort...
Making the Best of a Bad Market: Here's How the Nation's Biggest Mutual Fund Cleverly Prepared for the Inevitable-Investors Pulling out Their Money
It hasn't been much fun owning stocks lately, Friday's rally notwithstanding. Unless, of course, you're into masochism. The New Age Nasdaq's nauseating fall has vindicated us Old Age curmudgeons who think that corporate profits and assets are important....
MP3 for You and Me: Portable Digital Music Players Are More Popular Than Ever. with Some New Makers in the Game, Prices Are Dropping and Styles Are Hopping
The first portable mp3 player came out in 1998. It was black, about the size of a deck of cards and one of the least sexy gadgets to slide across our desk. In the two years since, Napster happened and suddenly everyone was talking Internet-friendly...
Newsmakers
Girl-Powered Comebacks It turns out the Spice Girls' optimistically titled album, "Forever," isn't the season's biggest comeback attempt. Straight outta the suburbs, '80s mall queen Tiffany--now a 28-year-old mom--is releasing her first album in...
Periscope
AGGIES 'They Didn't Hear the Screams' Even as they buried the victims of Texas A&M's deadly bonfire collapse last November, the Aggie community supported its 90-year football tradition. Now, a year after the tragedy killed 11 students and...
Perspectives
"No one should doubt our resolve to remain a force for peace and for stability... No one should assume they can attack us with impunity." Secretary of Defense William Cohen, on the explosion that killed 17 soldiers and tore a massive hole in the hull...
Pulling the Plug Early: In the Dot-Bomb Era, Some High-Profile Silicon Valley Investors Practice Start-Up Euthanasia. A New Trend?
Like so many other start-ups in Silicon Valley, Kibu.com, a Web site for teenage girls, raced through the typical corporate life cycle. Its founders, former Hewlett-Packard exec Judy MacDonald and Molly Lynch, an employee of broadband portal Excite@Home,...
State of the 'Union': A Law Allowing Gays to All but Marry Has Divided the Pastoral State of Vermont. 'It's like North and South,' Says One Woman
After 17 years together, Patricia Peard and Alice Brock didn't think they needed a ceremony to prove their love. But when they heard last summer that Vermont had just become the first state in the country to grant gays and lesbians marriagelike "civil...
Sunshine and Fine Lines: A Nobel for One Kim; a Summit for the Other?
The news flashed across Kwangju during the evening rush hour. The Nobel Peace Prize had been awarded to the city's favorite son, South Korean President Kim Dae Jung, 76. On the streets, where Kim's 1980 arrest sparked a civic insurrection in which...
The New Twilight Struggle: America Is Now Goliath, Facing Many Davids-Enemies Who Use Stealth, Speed and Suicide to Draw Blood. What We Can Do
Over the last decade America has had a surprisingly easy time as the global superpower. The backlash has been almost comic. A few hundred Frenchmen brandishing chunks of smelly cheese outside a McDonald's; Yuppie protesters in Seattle chanting old...
The Nobelest of Pursuits: Some of This Year's Prizes Were a Long Time Coming
If the Nobel Prizes in physics, chemistry and medicine are the Academy Awards of science, this year's citations are the equivalent of lifetime-achievement awards. The two youngest of the nine new laureates, announced last week, were born in 1936. Perhaps...
The Price of Pride: Losing Hand: As He Tries to Please Palestinian Radicals, Yasir Arafat Is Playing a Dangerous Game-And He May Run out of Options before Long
The older Palestinians in the crowd relished what they were seeing. Like men caught in a time warp, they were transported back to the blood passions of a simpler time. As Palestinians and Israelis edged to the brink of all-out war last week--only to...
The Temptations of Tea: Leaving Latte Behind, in Favor of 'Passion' or 'Envy'
Tamara Fish is laughing at her tea. This could be because she was up all night working on her thesis. Or maybe it's that here at Tealuxe, a new tea bar off Columbia University's campus in Manhattan, her tea has arrived with an hourglass. The "tea-tender"...
Too Close for Comfort: In a Tight Race, Bush and Gore Will Try to Keep a Civil Tone, but Unleash Ads and Surrogates to Do Battle over Taxes and Texas
It didn't take al Gore's team long to figure out their next big move: to mess with Texas. George W. Bush had performed well--surprisingly well--on foreign policy during last week's placid Wake Forest debate. But Bill Daley, the tough Chicagoan who...
Welcome to 'Animal House: Don't Be Fooled by Tales of Political Correctness. in Lots of Colleges, P.C. Stands for Party Central
The student occupation of buildings at Columbia University in 1968 remains the zenith or the nadir of all campus protests, depending on your politics. Richard Nixon (he was on the nadir side) warned in its wake that it was "the first major skirmish...
What Presidents Are For: The Choice: The Real Test of a Commander in Chief Is on the World Stage. How Bush and Gore Might Handle the Job
Presidents do not decide how much you will pay for drug prescriptions at your local pharmacy. They don't determine whether your child's classroom will be overcrowded, or your streets safe. They can, with Congress, have an indirect effect on domestic...