Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 5

A Blissful Dream, a Rude Awakening: The Supercharged Growth of Recent Years Was the Aberration. Job Cuts and Uncertainty Are Simply a Return to Economic Reality
Many people have been living in dreamland the past few years--and what a wonderful place it was. In Dreamland, stocks were guaranteed to go up at least 20 percent a year and employers would be lined up six deep to hire anyone who could fog a mirror....
A Gun Deal's Fatal Wound: As a Landmark Pact to Control Gun Sales Falls Apart, Smith & Wesson Takes the Hit
For more than 50 years, George Romanoff's family has been selling Smith & Wessons: .357 revolvers with hardwood handles, sleek pistols forged from blue and stainless steel. Smith's vaunted handgun line was easily the biggest seller at Romanoff's...
A New Line of Attack: Ashcroft Fends off Questions on Credibility
When Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee delayed the vote on John Ashcroft's nomination as attorney general last week, they said it was because he hadn't finished his homework: more than 300 written questions submitted by committee members...
Another Civil Action: The Lawyer Played by Travolta in the Movie Squares off with His Old Adversary, W. R. Grace
For three years, Jan Schlichtmann wandered the beaches and rain forests of Hawaii, trying to escape the case that made him famous. His failed prosecution of two companies accused of polluting the drinking water in Woburn, Mass., inspired the best-selling...
'Believe Me. I Know.': The Real Linda Richman Serves Up a Jewish Mother's Wisdom, Just like Her Alter Ego on 'SNL's' 'Coffee Talk'
Linda Richman may be the only self-help guru around who advises you to go to bed with potato chips and dip when you're feeling blue. Instead of flowing robes, she wears a Donna Karan jacket, clunky gold jewelry and thick glasses with slightly outre...
Can Bush Undo a Pardon? Rollback: The New Team Eyes Ways to Keep the Heat on Marc Rich
Bill Clinton had done it one last time: left the GOP hopping mad. When the exiting president issued his eleventh-hour pardon of Marc Rich, the fugitive financier living in Switzerland, Republicans immediately went on the attack, accusing Clinton of...
China Wakes Up a Tiger: Hard-Liners in Beijing Call Falun Gong an 'Evil Cult' and Try to Stamp It out. but with Growing Support Overseas, Repression on the Mainland Could Turn a Spiritual Movement into a Political Opposition
As night falls over the working-class district of Yau Ma Tei in Hong Kong, two dozen members of the Falun Gong movement sit closely together in a small tenement, chanting from their handbooks. In a corner of the room, one man does not chant. He is...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY: Going to The Hoop Kobe and Shaq may not always get along in the real world, but in NBA Live 2001 ($50; Electronic Arts) these two superstars play together better than ever. This PlayStation 2 hoops game features some of the most fluid...
Drowning in a Sea of Debt: For Families without Savings, a Lost Job Can Be a Disaster
When Bob Bridgeman was laid off from his job two weeks ago as an administrator with the March of Dimes, it was an especially tough blow for his family of six. For years Bridgeman had been living close to the financial edge. He and his wife have only...
Getting Past Today's Layoffs: Companies Say There's a Worker Shortage. That's Good News for Anyone Who Lost a Job
If you ever have to lose a job, let it be now. new positions are cropping up faster than old ones are being chopped. Layoffs hit the headlines when several major companies tossed out hundreds of workers amid reports of a slowdown in economic growth....
Going Super Slow: Lifting Weights at a Snail's Pace Can Work Wonders. Is It the Whole Key to Fitness?
For 10 years Dr. Philip Alexander ran 60 miles a week--and on days when he didn't run he would put in time on his bike. Then, five years ago, he really got serious about physical fitness. The 56-year-old Texas internist now spends just 20 minutes a...
How Safe Is Your Job? Pink Slips Are Suddenly Flying Again, as Employers Show a New Willingness to Cast off Workers at the First Hint of Trouble. Why This Wave of Layoffs Is Different, and What Workers Can Do to Prepare for the Worst
When Sara Proman arrived at her cubicle at a consulting firm in Boston on a recent morning, she received an ominous voice mail. A partner wanted to meet with her. The agenda? His assistant wouldn't say. So Proman, a 24-year-old research consultant...
Mail Call
Waging the Crypto War Our cover story on cryptography, from Steven Levy's new book, elicited strong opinions. "No event in human history has so fundamentally altered the relationship between government and governed as the crypto breakthrough," declared...
Meeting under a Big 'Tent': How a Biblical Tale Became a Word-of-Mouth Phenom
At 3202 Shalom Way in South Bend, Ind., there is a monument to Dinah. Her name is carved into the faux Western Wall stone across a towering window of the Jewish Community Center of St. Joseph Valley, though her story amounts to a few lines in Genesis....
Newsmakers
Had Enough of Puff? She's standing behind her man--way, way behind him. As with Bill and Hill, Ben and Gwyn and so many other career-obsessed power couples, it's hard to get a handle on Jennifer Lopez and Sean (Puffy) Combs's rocky year-and-a-half...
Online Games Get Real: First It Was Man vs. Machine. Then Came Multiplayer Action on the Net. Now, a New Generation of Games Virtually Infiltrates Your Life, Sending Clues in E-Mail, Phone Calls and Faxes
Pop quiz: Was Lee Harvey Oswald a patsy? Is our government concealing alien life forms at Area 51? Does the secret Illuminati society exist? And are shows like "The X-Files" just part of a massive cover-up? If you answered yes to all of the above,...
Pass Me an Oscar: The Nominations Are a Few Short Weeks Away. Listen in as 2000's Hottest Producers Talk Shop
Oscar nominations will be revealed unto the world on Feb. 13, at some ungodly hour, Pacific time. Already we can't stand the wait. Every year, at the height of the melee known as awards season, NEWSWEEK invites Hollywood's most acclaimed filmmakers...
Paying Kids to Study? It's Not a Crazy Idea. Black Students Look Up to Tiger, Venus and Serena; Let's Give Them the Same Incentives These Athletes Had
Tiger Woods and Serena and Venus Williams have been amazingly successful in the historically "white" sports of golf and tennis. Their popularity among young African-Americans makes me wonder if black students accused of "acting white" by their classmates...
Periscope
INDIA Waiting for the Next Disaster After last week's earthquake devastated the Indian state of Gujarat, leaving a death toll of possibly 15,000, fears rose that Delhi could be next in line. Nearly the entire subcontinent is earthquake-prone,...
Perspectives
"Failure will be sanctioned." George W. Bush, referring to his ability to withhold money from states whose schools don't improve, a new element in the voucher debate "I was not out there hawking last-minute pardons and selling my reputation....
'Privileging' Postmodernism: There Are Facets of Contemporary Culture That Not Even a Jonathan Swift Could Satirize
The word "privilege" has become a ubiquitous verb in commentary, part of the patois of cultural theorists who say things like, "Hegemonic phallocentric bourgeois culture privileges white male art at the expense of the marginalized." There are facets...
Putting Poor Kids First: Schooled: But Bush's Plan Won't Help Everybody
Not long ago, Republicans wanted to shut the Department of Education, arguing that schools were a local responsibility and Washington shouldn't be throwing money at failing classrooms. President Bush turned that argument around last week, proposing...
Taking Aim at Abortion: The Roe Wars: How Bush Could Alter the Landscape
The anniversary of Roe v. Wade has become a rite of passage for new presidents. Falling right after Inauguration Day, when the press, lawmakers and interest groups are scrutinizing every utterance from the incoming administration, it's an opportunity...
Texas Two-Step: Showtime: In a Carefully Choreographed Debut, Bush Pays off the Right, Then Moves to the Middle. Heeding His Dad's Past Stumbles, Dubya Is off to a Smooth Start. but the Dance Is a Tricky One
The message from the new Bush White House to John McCain seemed clear: you're not One of Us. The senator wasn't on the list of Republican committee chairmen invited to the Inauguration Day luncheon, or to any of the hot-ticket soirees that night. Bush's...
The End of the Road: The Law Finally Caught Up with the Terrifying Texas Seven in a Colorado Trailer Park. Their Life on the Lam
He seemed oddly confident for a convict serving 17 life sentences in the Texas prison system--but then, George Angel Rivas had a plan. "Someday, somehow, by the Grace of our Father, I will see you face to face without these walls," Rivas wrote his...
The View from the Front: The Bush Team Wants to Disengage in Bosnia, but U.S. Soldiers on the Ground Think That's a Dangerous Idea
Lt. Matt Stapleton is a long way from hurricane duty. On an unseasonably warm January morning, the North Carolina National Guardsman is bouncing in a Humvee through Bratunac, a town in eastern Bosnia whose entire Muslim population was murdered or driven...
'What the Future Will Be': Shimon Peres Might like Another Chance to Lead, but the Choice Isn't His
Many members of Israel's ruling Labor Party want to see former prime minister Shimon Peres run in landmark elections on Feb. 6. They believe he would have a better chance than sitting Prime Minister Ehud Barak of beating right-wing Likud contender...