Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 24

2001: Ring the Bells Backward: America Was Abruptly Yanked Back into History and Reminded of Stony Paths to the Present
Byline: George F. Will On the morning of September 11, commuters heading for World Trade Center offices read New York Times front-page headlines about the arrest of a person charged with hijacking an airliner from Canada to Cuba 30 years ago, and...
A Matter of Missed Signals: FBI Agents Had Zacarias Moussaoui in Their Sights before September 11. What Happened? Weighing the Case
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Daniel Klaidman FBI agents in Minneapolis don't snag many cases involving international terrorists. The field office's counterterrorism unit, "Squad 5" in bureau lingo, has spent much of its time tracking down radical...
A New Arms Game: Bush Scraps a Treaty, Ends an Era, and Moscow. Shrugs. What Just Changed?
Byline: Christian Caryl Vladimir Belous should be very disappointed. The former general, a veteran of the Soviet Union's elite nuclear-strike forces, has spent the better part of his retirement working to discredit U.S. plans for missile defense....
A Split Decision: Cool Film about a Hot Man
Byline: David Ansen 3 Stars Ali OPENING NATIONWIDE: Dec. 25 Ratings based on a 1 to 5 scale Muhammad Ali didn't play by the rules, and neither does Michael Mann's honest, richly detailed, gorgeous movie about him. An uncompromising look at...
Evil in the Cross Hairs: As U.S. Forces Close in on Bin Laden, Washington Is Debating the Next Phase in the Longer War: Should America Try to Assassinate Terrorist Leaders? A NEWSWEEK Exclusive
Byline: Evan Thomas and John Barry It must be one of the most repulsive home movies ever made. Osama bin Laden chuckles contentedly over slaughtering his own men along with several thousand Americans, while his flunkies kiss up to him like junior...
Have Yourself a Movie Little Xmas: David Ansen's Holiday Guide
Byline: David Ansen It was the best of times, it was the worst of times: it's been that kind of year for Hollywood, too. The bean counters are smiling -- the studios are enjoying a record-breaking year at the box office. But was anybody else happy?...
How to Save the Arab World: Washington's Hands-Off Approach Must Go. the First Step to Undermining Extremism Is to Prod Regimes into Economic Reform
Byline: Fareed Zakaria It is always the same splendid setting--and the same sad story. A senior American diplomat enters one of the grand presidential palaces in Heliopolis, the neighborhood of Cairo from which President Hosni Mubarak rules over...
'I Was the Most Optimistic': Transcript of the Osama Bin Laden Videotape
In an incriminating amateur videotape found at a house in Jalalabad, Osama bin Laden rejoices over the September 11 attacks and describes in detail how he planned them. The conversation took place during a visit in early November by a man believed...
I Won't Take 'See You Later' for Granted: On September 11, I Was Glued to the Television like Everyone Else. What I Saw Changed My Perspective
Byline: Kobe Bryant One of the things I always believed is that no matter how bad something is, you can take something positive out of it. The one time I wasn't sure of that was on September 11. I usually wake up at 6:30 or 7 in the morning....
Periscope
Byline: Michael Isikoff and Daniel Klaidman with Karen Breslau in San Francisco; Debra Rosenbert; Sudip Mazumdar EXCLUSIVE What Walker Knows--And What He Faces President George W. Bush described American Taliban fighter John Walker Lindh as a...
Perspectives
"We are patient, we are determined, and we're committed." Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, on American resolve "When you use those words, 'mystique' and 'aura,' those are dancers in a nightclub. Those are not things we concern ourselves [with]...
The Bad Old Days Are Back: How Israeli-Arab Relations Are Complicating Bush's War
Byline: Dan Ephron It isn't an official house arrest, but in practice Yasir Arafat is stuck. For two weeks now the Palestinian leader hasn't left his Ramallah headquarters, a sprawling compound that until a few years ago served as an Israeli military...
The Catch on Smoking Guns: How the Bin Laden Tape Could Make Future Cases in the War on Terror Harder to Close
Byline: Jonathan Alter Call in the FBI and [say] 'Don't go any further into this case, period!' " That was a portion of the June 23, 1972, audio recording that became the original "smoking gun" tape, proving that President Nixon had ordered the...
The View from Tora Bora: Can Al Qaeda's Leaders Find a Way out of Their Trap?
Byline: Melinda Liu and Sami Yousafzai Even as the Saudi fighter spoke, American B-52s were bombing the last Qaeda stronghold of Tora Bora. Afghan fighters had flushed the Qaeda guerrillas out of two main caves and into the Agam and Wazir valleys,...
True Believer: Ali Was the First Muslim America Loved. but It Took a Doomed Friendship with Malcolm X to Show Him the Way
Byline: Devin Gordon Malcolm X was in the next room, just a closed door away, when the Champ made up his mind to cut him off. Hours earlier, 22-year-old Cassius Clay "shook up the world," taking the heavyweight title from Sonny Liston, a snarling...
'We Are Vigilant': Donald Rumsfeld, the Media Star of the War, Talks about the Battles Ahead
Byline: Lally Weymouth Last summer Donald Rumsfeld was deemed a fiasco as secretary of Defense. He had rubbed Congress and the brass the wrong way--there were even rumors he was on his way out. But since America's bombing campaign in Afghanistan...
What We Need for Christmas: Congress Should Pass a Stimulus Package That Puts Money into Consumers' Hands, and Soon
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Santa, baby, slip a sable under the tree, for me..." Eartha Kitt, the original material girl, hit pay dirt with that torchy lyric back in 1953. But during wars and recessions, holidays don't reverberate with the same ka-ching....