Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from No. 2, January 11

1899: The Names Have Changed, but the Worries Remain
The economy is booming, and Americans revel in prosperity after bouncing back from a recession. Advancements in technology are changing the way we live, and there is hope that the new century will bring even more progress. But anxiety lurks beneath...
A Not Very Good Film
Politics has become less something in which people engage than something they watch Back in the chilliest days of the cold war, be- fore outsiders had any access to the Soviet Union, there was a thriving school of analysts called "Sovietologists."...
A President in the Dock
History: What Rehnquist's take on 1868 tells us about what's ahead. At 1 p.m. on march 5, 1868, the capitol doors were opened as Chief Justice Salmon Chase, solemn in his black robe, took his seat on the Senate rostrum. Just days earlier Andrew...
Bigger, but Not Better
Fishermen might not mind the lake trout's taking over Yellowstone Lake--but they should I grew up a fisherman. it was predetermined. my father was a fisherman, my grandfather and his father, too. I could tie flies before I could tie my own shoes....
California: Gunfire in the Night; A Confusing Police Shooting Kills a Teenager
It began as a peculiar call for help in the night. Two cousins of 19-year-old Tyisha Miller, a night-school student in Riverside, Calif., called 911 to report that she was locked inside a car at a gas station. She appeared to be unconscious and shaking,...
Denver's No-Flash Back: Terrell Davis Just Wants to Keep His Head Down
He had his first taste of football stardom at the age of 8 when he earned the nickname "Boss Hogg" as a bowl-'em-over running back on a Pop Warner team in San Diego. So Terrell Davis was thrilled to accompany his Denver Broncos teammate John Elway...
Disney Says Let's 'Go' Mickey and Friends Present (Another) Portal
One of the revealing things about the first television ads for the new Internet site Go Network is what they don't say. There's no mention of parent company Infoseek or its partner, the Walt Disney Co. Then there's what's on the screen. In one commercial,...
Families: The Octuplet Question
A historic delivery raises concerns about multiples For weeks, nkem chukwu and the babies in her belly had defied gravity. In her Houston hospital bed, the 27-year-old lay tilted head down, feet in the air, as doctors tried desperately to withhold...
Fast, Yes. Easy? No
Meet the day traders--financial guerrillas who are behind much of the Internet stock frenzy Marc mccord has it all. Nice house, car, boat. Works when he wants and says he makes "in the high six figures." He's 33 and never went to college. How...
From a Rapper to a Gym Rat: Hip-Hop Superstar Master P Tries out in the Bush Leagues
Growing up in new orleans's Calliope housing projects, Percy Miller learned some hard life lessons. But in a smallish basketball arena in Fort Wayne, Ind., recently, there were more to learn. Ira Bowman, who plays guard for the Connecticut Pride, isolated...
Human Rights: China Kills a Few Chickens
The new crackdown on political activists may mean that party leaders are afraid of deeper unrest To most chinese, the political atmosphere still feels more like springtime than winter, with daring new ideas coming into bud. At a library in Guangzhou,...
No Ordinary Headache
Doctors classify headaches into three main types. The worst, cluster headache, is also the rarest; tension-type headache is more familiar. But an estimated 25 million people get migraines, complicated combinations of intense pain and neurological symptoms...
Saddam + Bin Laden?
It would be a marriage made in hell. And America's two enemies are courting. In the no-fly zones of north-ern and southern Iraq, Saddam Hussein's gunners blindly fired surface-to-air missiles at patrolling American and British warplanes. In Yemen,...
Shutting Up about Sex
Republicans should pipe down before 'character' inquisitions sink them in 2000 On the day after the 1996 election, I received an envelope in the mail with no return address and nothing inside but a plaid bumper sticker with no writing on it. Could...
The Global Economy: Here Comes the Euro
The Old World gets new money. Should you care? Last week the euro became the official common currency of 11 European countries: Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal and Spain. (Britain,...
The Men Pressing the Case
The country may be sick of the Lewinsky matter, but the hawkish House team is eager for its moment in the Senate. Called "managers," they'll act as prosecutors if a trial comes to pass. Henry Hyde The chairman who sought to look impartial is...
The Mideast Reshuffling the Deck
An Israeli election used to be a straightforward battle between Labor and Likud. But visions of a new political center have widened the field since Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's right-wing government collapsed. A look at the keycontenders for...
The New War against Migraines
These vicious headaches have been a mystery to doctors, sheer misery for sufferers. Now science is decoding how migraines work, yielding new drugs and restoring lives. It flattens you out, the woman says, de- scribing the pain that seems to lie,...
The Poet Lariat
On the town with Larry McMurtry as he winds up his dazzling 'Last Picture Show' trilogy Larry mcmurtry casts a cold eye on the runty mesquite and the oil rigs that pock the plains around his hometown of Archer City, Texas (population: 1,918). But...
The Power of Big Ideas
Was the light bulb more important than the pill? An online gathering of scientists nominates the most important inventions of the past 2,000 years. Some of their choices might surprise you. What changed the course of human events most profoundly?...
'The Public Will Choose Me'
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu discussed the upcoming elections with Newsweek's Joseph Contreras in Jerusalem last week. CONTRERAS: What are your prospects for winning a sec-ond term? NETANYAHU: I have no doubt that we will win. A majority...
The Real People of 'A Civil Action' Try Moving On
If you read jonathan harr's true- life best seller "A Civil Action"--and 1.5 million people did--you'll never forget the Woburn case. If you didn't read it, the new John Travolta movie isn't a bad introduction. There were the grieving parents of a...
The Test for Trent
Maneuvers: Lott, who prizes calm, is caught in a storm. In august 1996, two months after Chester Trent Lott became the majority leader of the United States Senate, he granted a reporter a rare interview inside his Pascagoula, Miss., home. Lott,...
Trial and Tribulation
Showdown: As a chaotic capital gets ready for the gavel to fall, Washington wonders whether Clinton's trial will be quick--or dirty. Down at renaissance weekend in hilton head, s.c., where the president, his family and his dog had gone to hang out...
Wall Street: Clash of the Indexes
The S&P 500 whipped the Dow last year. More than just bragging rights are at stake here. If you think the competition in the National Football League playoffs is intense, take a look at Wall Street's index playoffs. These big-money games pit...
What's Bred in the Bone
Fathers, sons, battery and the bottle. Welcome to Paul Schrader's haunting new film 'Affliction.' Novelist russell Banks, the author of "Continental Drift" and "The Sweet Hereafter," is a specialist in the bruised, violent male psyche, and he couldn't...
When Pain Runs in the Family
Kids' migraines are even trickier to diagnose and treat. But new treatments promise children relief, as well. When Anthony Stall got his first piercing headache at the age of 4, his mother, Karyn, recognized his pain, nausea and aversion to light...