Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 22

AOL's 'Transforming Transaction': While Other Dot-Coms Plunged, AOL Was Good Enough-Or Lucky Enough-To Trade Its Paper for Some of the World's Finest Media Jewels
When business historians look back at the financial foibles of the late 20th century and ask the inevitable question--"What were they thinking?"--last week's birth of AOL Time Warner will be seen as a watershed event. If there was ever an example of...
Birth of a Breakthrough: A Multimedia Oratorio on Christ's Nativity? Check Your Cynicism. 'El Nino' Exceeds All Expectations
To call John Adams's "El Nino" exactly what it is--an oratorio on Christ's nativity, supplementing the New Testament account with Spanish poems by women poets--may give you the wrong idea. Is this some trite attempt to subvert the Santa Clausian sublimity...
Brave New Monkey: By Creating the First Genetically Altered Primate, Scientists Take One Step Closer to Allowing Parents to Custom-Order Their Child's Genetic Traits
He's a frisky little fellow, swinging from a ring in his doll-size white T shirt with the black belt, clambering over and through an elaborate cat-scratching post, sucking his thumb and ducking for cover when playmates Sandy and Sammy ambush him. To...
Bush: 'I'm Going to Be Everybody's President': The President-Elect on Taxes, African-Americans, Abortion, Ashcroft and the Tough Job Ahead
On Jan. 9, George W. Bush boarded a plane in Austin bound for Andrews Air Force Base on the final leg of a journey to national power that began almost two years ago. In flight, between bottles of Evian, Bush shared his thoughts about the challenges...
Bush: The New Money Agenda: Expect More Changes in the Tax and Financial Rules Than the Pundits Now Predict
During President Clinton's final term, he spent a lot of time blocking plays. Republican bills were racking up strong majorities in Congress, thanks to modest Democratic support. But they weren't veto-proof majorities, so the legislation died. For...
Bylines
Changing With the Changing of the Guard Martha Brant knew she'd hit her stride with the George W. Bush campaign when the candidate's nickname for her changed from "NEWSWEEK Jogger Girl" to "Martita." "That meant he'd learned my name," says Brant,...
California Powers Down: Thanks to New Plants, Things Will Go Better in Texas
California has a knack for starting national trends, but Gerald Weiser sure hopes the state's disastrous experience with its utilities isn't one of them. Weiser owns an ice-making company in Texas, the next big state slated to deregulate its power...
Getting Ready for the Fire This Time: Yes, the Bush Administration Appears Diverse. but to Many Blacks, Ashcroft Is Turning Wariness into Rage. What's Ahead
No one expected George W. Bush to connect with blacks as easily as Bill Clinton. Something about Clinton arouses excessive emotions--something having to do with his own outsize appetites and his unapologetically roguish charm. In many blacks, he inspired...
'Jumping to the Music': With a New Coach, Tim Goebel Hopes to Lift Off
Tim Goebel has long been derided by the figure-skating world as a one-trick pony. But what a trick. While the world's best male skaters have struggled to land a quadruple jump in competition, the up-and-coming American star seems to have mastered the...
Lay of the Land Mines
John Ashcroft's nomination will be a crucial early test of the Bush team's political capital. It is also shaping up as an epic struggle between liberals and conservatives, fueled by fury over the close election contest. The flash points so far: ...
'Let Us.'? No, Give It a Rest. That Phrase-Kennedy Used It 16 Times, Nixon 22-Means 'Pull Up Your Socks and Shape Up'
Come Saturday, on the Capitol's west front, the 43d president, immediately after becoming such, will look out, figuratively speaking (and as F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote at the conclusion of "The Great Gatsby"), toward "the dark fields of the republic"...
Looming Storm? Little Else Matters: How a Serious Economic Slump Could Undermine George W's Popularity and Swamp His Presidency
What George W. Bush ought to fear is Japan--not as a threat, but as a warning. A bit more than a decade ago, Japan was enjoying a phenomenal economic boom. The stock market rose relentlessly. Inflation and unemployment were negligible. Hardly anyone...
Mail Call
Time to Say Goodbye to 2000 Our readers, as well as our year-end double issue, were full of reflections on the year 2000. "Your review was such a great recap of 2000!" cheered one. Said another: "I was quite relieved to see your double issue featuring...
My Prescription for Docs: Check the Costs: We're All Concerned with Affordable Health Care, So Why Don't Physicians Learn the Price of Medications?
Do you know how much that new prescription costs?" the pharmacist asked a nurse at my mother's assisted-living facility. The nurse told me she suggested starting with just a few pills, but the pharmacist interrupted: "Does the family know how much...
Newsmakers
Curtains for Kim and Alec They met on the set of "The Marrying Man." Now Kim Basinger and Alec Baldwin can't seem to get past the seven-year itch. The Oscar-winning actress filed for divorce from the head of the Baldwin clan last week, blaming "irreconcilable...
Next Up on the Hot Seat: Interior Nominee Gale Norton Faces New, Tough Questions
The subject was one close to Gale Norton's heart: states' rights. George Bush's nominee for secretary of the Interior was still Colorado's attorney general in August 1996 when she spoke to the Independence Institute, a conservative think tank. One...
'N Sync and a Whopper: The Latest Finds Make the Universe Seem a Lot Weirder
With its demurely twinkling stars, glowing planets and a moon that waxes and wanes like clockwork, the night sky seems like an awfully sedate, G-rated show. But appearances can be deceptive. Beyond the reach of the naked eye, black holes slurp up surrounding...
Periscope
RELIGION New Red Hats--And the Next Pope? Pope John Paul II is expected to name 25 to 30 new cardinals this week, and one of them could be his successor. Some names to look for: Italian Giovanni Battista Re, 66, head of the Congregation of Bishops...
Perspectives
"I'll be unleashing the box step."President-elect George W. Bush, looking forward to the Inaugural balls "So long as the game in Washington is a game of search and destroy, I think we will have very few people who are willing to do what I did, which...
Red Zone vs. Blue Zone: Two Americas: The Urban-Rural Divide Was Starker Than Ever in Election 2000. A Visit to Scranton Suggests It Will Be Hard to Bridge the Gap. the View from the Front
It's opening night at the Banshee, a new Irish pub in what used to be a deserted warehouse in downtown Scranton. At the polished cherry-wood bar, local pols and union reps sing along to a folk band playing "When the Breakers Go Back Full Time," a wistful...
Right from the Start: In the Cross-Fire: The First Battle of the Bush Years Pits Right vs. Left in the Fight over Ashcroft for Attorney General. the Man-And What the Clash Means for the New Era
George W. Bush wanted Marc Racicot to be his attorney general, or so it seemed. The president-elect and the Montana governor were fellow runners and Racicot had done yeoman service during the election overtime in Florida, talking tough in a soothing...
Seeing a Virtual Shrink: More Therapists Are Hanging out Shingles Online. but Who Are They? Who's Logging on? and Does It Work?
When Rita Lowitt, a Berkeley marriage and family therapist, isn't meeting clients in her office, she's treating them from home. Some nights, she might comfort a nervous new mom. Others, a stressed-out CEO or a fortysomething with a disappointing sex...
So Long, Music Man: CODA: Yes, There Was Dissonance and Clatter. but Most of the Country Liked Bill Clinton's Way of Striking Up the Band
He's just a bang beat, bell-ringing, big haul, great go, neck-or-nothing, rip roarin', every timea bull's-eye salesman. That's Professor Harold Hill. --"The Music Man" Los Angeles. August 2000. President Clinton, having completed his rip-roarin'...
Team Bush: HERE THEY COME: Choosing Graybeards and Fresh Faces, Drawing on Old Hands from the Nixon-Ford-Reagan-Bush I Days and New Blood from Texas, the 43d President Is about to Hit Town with a Diverse Cabinet and Loyal Cadre of Aides. but He's Got a Slim Mandate and a Narrowly Split Nation. Can George W. Bush Bring Peace to Washington-And the Country? A Peek at the New Capital Gang. PHOTOGRAPHS BY NORMAN JEAN ROY
HERE THEY COME: Choosing graybeards and fresh faces, drawing on old hands from the Nixon-Ford-Reagan-Bush I days and new blood from Texas, the 43d president is about to hit town with a diverse cabinet and loyal cadre of aides. But he's got a slim mandate...
The Doggfather: From Bitten to Barking
Snoop Dogg knows how to bust a move. The bump, the hustle or even his patented Long Beach gangsta dance--you name it, and the self-proclaimed ''Doggfather'' of rap is doing it this afternoon. It's the music flowing through the room that's got him moving:...
The Family Business: Birthright: From the Adamses to the Bushes, America's Always Had an Ambivalent View of Political Dynasties. the Lessons of History
For all the mythology about presidents "born in a log cabin," the history of American politics is rich with dynasties. In the 19th century, the Adams family produced John (president from 1797 to 1801) and his son John Quincy (1825-1829), and William...