Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 6

A Bad Bet in Monte Carlo: How the Cops Let Billionaire Banker Edmond Safra Die
Autopsy photographs of the late billionaire Edmond Safra do not show a man who was terrified at the moment he died. Nor do the pictures, examined by NEWSWEEK, show bullet wounds, as some reports have suggested. The official autopsy concludes that the...
America's New Balancing Act: Is the World Ganging Up on Us? Henry Kissinger Says Yes-And Bush Should Begin to Take Heed
For the last dozen years scholars of international politics have pondered a puzzle--why is no one ganging up against the United States? Throughout modern history countries have regularly resisted a rising global power. The world mobilized against Napoleon's...
A Steely Southerner: Growing Up in Alabama Gave Condi Rice a Core of Strength. Just Ask the Russians
As a girl growing up in Birmingham, Ala., Condoleezza Rice sat quietly in her music class as the other children made a ruckus, blowing on their instruments and ignoring the teacher. "I'm waiting for my instructions," piped up little Condi. "And would...
Back to the Mountains: Too Country for Country Radio? What's a Girl to Do? Patty Loveless's Answer: Make a Great Bluegrass Record
Back in 1992, when she was still about the hottest item in Nashville, Patty Loveless made the country-music equivalent of a pilgrimage to kiss the Pope's ring. At the invitation of mountain-music patriarch Ralph Stanley, she and Emory Gordy Jr., her...
Bush's America Is Working: And How. Forty Percent of Vacationers Are in Daily-Yes, Daily-Contact with Their Offices
Washington's conventional wisdom, which often is the wishful thinking in its media culture, is that George W. Bush's presidency is floundering. But as he passes the six-month mark, only one eighth of the way through his term, his serenity seems grounded...
CEOs Sound the Warning
Every newspaper reader has a first stop, whether it's the sports page, the funnies or a gossip column. For business types, it's the front-page "What's News" summary of The Wall Street Journal--and as 2001 turns into an annus horribilis for corporate...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY Microsoft's Saucy Swiss Side Do monopolies make you horny, baby? If so, expect Office XP to sell a ton of copies in Switzerland thanks to this ad, in which a frisky fellow discovers that his date's bra has been password-protected. The...
Discounts on Your RX Drugs: Where to Find Lower Prices-And Why Bush's Senior-Discount Plan Could Change Medicare
Pay close attention to the drug-discount cards for seniors just announced by President George W. Bush. At first blush, they sound like a small, stopgap way of cutting the cost of prescription drugs while you're waiting for "real" drug benefits under...
Fighting the HMO Meanies: Managed Care Is the Only Industry in America That Can't Be Sued. That Makes No Sense
President Bush believes he's getting the hang of things in Washington. "A dictatorship would be a heck of a lot easier--there's no question about it," he said again last week, repeating what appears to be his favorite quip. "But dealing with Congress...
Free at Last: 'I'm Not a Spy': Scholar Li Shaomin Tells of His Harrowing Five Months in a Chinese Prison. A NEWSWEEK Exclusive
Confined in a Chinese prison, Li Shaomin was stripped of virtually everything that would bring him comfort--letters from his daughter, the Bible his wife sent him, books and newspapers with information on the outside world. Referred to as prisoner...
[Inverted Question mark]Como Se Dice 'Realignment'? Immigration and Trucking Spur Bush's Hispanic Outreach
Here's this summer's trend in politics: Spanish lessons. Republican Rick Perry, George W. Bush's successor as governor of Texas, could barely sound-bite his way through a tamale at Cinco de Mayo. So he enrolled in two weeks of total-immersion Spanish...
Mail Call
Jammin' With Jesus Many teenage fans of contemporary Christian music were among the readers responding to our July 16 cover story. "I was very glad to see that CCM is finally getting some positive feedback from the secular media," wrote a 15-year-old...
My Life as a Guinea Pig: Clinical Trials Are Inherently Risky, but One Saved Me
On a sunny San Diego afternoon in the winter of 1996, I was jogging on the beach near my home when I reached up to scratch my neck and discovered a walnut-size lump. Ignoring it for a few weeks, I finally decided a few days before Christmas to have...
Newsmakers
Return of a Refugee Rumors of Lauryn Hill's breakdown have been greatly exaggerated. By her. "I'm crazy and emotionally disturbed," she sarcastically admits. "People don't mess with you when they think you're crazy." It's been three years since...
Our Way-But for How Much Longer? 'When We Get Too Old' Is No Longer a Distant Concept, and Suddenly We're Forced to Rethink How We Live
It was a scene that had occurred often over the past 30 years. I was standing in the bed of our pickup truck and my husband was on a tall farm wagon, pitching bales of hay to me to stack. But after a few minutes he stopped. "Whew," he remarked....
Periscope: NEWSWEEK'S Look Behind and beyond the News
CHANDRA LEVY Nonexistent Phone Calls (and Other False Tales) Was Chandra Levy frantically trying to reach Rep. Gary Condit in the days before she disappeared? A flurry of last-minute calls has been widely reported--but it didn't happen. Last week...
Perspectives
Publisher Correction: August 07, 2001 ________________________________________________________________________________ In our August 6 PERSPECTIVES section, a jocular quote about Secretary of State Colin Powell was attributed to former secretary of...
Scouts Divided: Since a Supreme Court Ruling against Gays in the Boy Scouts, Americans Are Increasingly Torn over a Beloved Institution
Jeff Moran and some friends from Troop 1320 dropped onto the lawn near Trading Post 13 last Tuesday, a sweltering morning during the 15th Boy Scouts Jamboree at Fort A.P. Hill near Fredericksburg, Va. Despite the heat wave, over the next 10 days they...
Southern Lady, World-Class Storyteller: Eudora Welty, April 13, 1909-July 23, 2001
In 1999 the author Willie Morris described a drive he took with his friend and fellow Mississippian Eudora Welty through the spooky, kudzu-choked back roads of Yazoo County, about 40 miles north of her home in Jackson. "At the crest of a bosky hill,...
The Bandanna Is Back: Daniel Ortega Was a Giant Thorn in the Side of George W. Bush's Father. Now the Former Sandinista Leader Is Favored to Become Nicaragua's Next President
The air shakes with the rhythm of campaign jingles, the explosion of fireworks and cries of "Daniel! Daniel!" There he is, perched on the bed of a pickup, winding through the potholed streets, waving to the crowd as it swells around him. He wears his...
The House of Grubman: Why Is Everyone Gunning for Lizzie? Let's Start with Her Take-No-Prisoners Dad
When Allen Grubman's daughter got kicked out of prep school years ago, the high-powered music lawyer knew just what to do: he made a few phone calls and got her enrolled in another (and still another when she flamed out of that one--and another after...
The Right Economic Medicine? the First Tax-Rebate Checks Are Arriving, and Bush Says the $38 Billion Will Give the Ailing Economy a Needed Shot in the Arm. but with Growth Slowing, Layoffs Climbing and CEOs Increasingly Grim, It May Not Provide Much of a Boost
Raymond Herbst, a New York firefighter, is going to splurge. He's taking his wife to dinner at Windows on the World atop the World Trade Center. Coren Claborn, a bank teller in Spring, Texas, plans to spend the cash on a CD player for her car. Richard...
The Road Rave: A Generation Travels the World in Search of the Perfect Party
Here's a quick quiz to see if you're ready for a rave vacation. Does dancing in the blazing Mediterranean sun at high noon in a cotton-candy-pink wig, vinyl chaps and melting body paint sound appealing? Is a sleepless week filled with pounding house...
The Trouble with Hairy: It's the People vs. the Primates in 'Planet of the Apes'
The apes in Tim Burton's "Planet of the Apes" look tremendously regal, but the heavy makeup makes the actors sound thick-tongued and muffled: it's like they're all wearing retainers. Fortunately, you can follow the plot without subtitles. An Air Force...
Trials-And Errors: Experiments on Human Volunteers Are Crucial to Biomedical Progress. but Do They Pose an Unacceptable Risk?
Gretchen Stewart thought she was doing the best thing for her 3-month-old boy when she allowed the doctor to include him in a human experiment. Little Gage was a fussy baby who seemed to be filled with as much gas as a balloon. The doctor, Susan Orenstein...
Waterworld: Fishing, Not Pollution, Has Decimated the Seas
What do sea grasses in the Florida Bay, blue crabs in the Chesapeake and sea otters in the North Pacific have in common? While scientists have tried to pin the blame for their decline on causes from pollution to climate change, a new international...
Whatever Happened To.? after Sydney, Marion Jones Searches for the Limelight
If there was one thing you'd think Marion Jones wouldn't need after three Olympic gold medals in Sydney last year, it would be more recognition. What greater laurel could fame bestow than to sit down with that American triumvirate of Leno, Letterman...
Where the Girls Are: The Girl Scouts Try a Version of 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'
Nine years ago long-time Scout and adult volunteer Kristen Renn was slated to run a Girl Scout counselor-in-training program in Rhode Island when the local council there told her that her help wasn't needed. Renn, then an assistant dean at Brown University,...