Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from February 17

Abe Lincoln, Teen Geek: 'Clone High USA' Sends History's Heroes Back to School
Byline: Devin Gordon Life at Clone High wouldn't be so bad for 16-year-old Abraham Lincoln if JFK, the captain of the football team, wasn't always bullying him with that silly Boston accent. Or if Cleopatra would give him so much as a second glance....
Advertising: The Perks of a Hostile Work Environment
Byline: Devin Gordon Since making his acquaintance with America two weeks ago, 6-foot-7, 330-pound actor Lester Speight--a.k.a. Terry Tate, a.k.a. the Office Linebacker, a.k.a. the really big dude who pancakes unsuspecting Dilberts in that Reebok...
After Powell, before War
Byline: George F. Will At 10 a.m. eastern time Wednesday, as Colin Powell arrived at the United Nations to tutor some slow learners about the obvious regarding Iraq, North Korea--it was midnight there--announced it was reactivating the Yongbyon...
Books: On Iraq's Cockeyed Optimist
Byline: Seth Mnookin Kenneth Pollack's "The Threatening Storm" (Random House. $25.95) is that rarest of books: a foreign-policy tome that's not only readable but actually influential. It's been said that Pollack, a national-security official under...
Boots, Bytes and Bombs: The Pentagon Calls It 'Shock and Awe.' Iraq Will Call It a Nightmare. the Military's New High-Tech Road Map for Taking out Saddam-And How He Might Fight Back
Byline: John Barry and Evan Thomas It's called the "E-bomb." Delivered by a cruise missile, the E-bomb is a warhead that explodes to emit a high-energy pulse that, like a bolt of lightning, will fuse any electrical equipment within range. The E-bomb...
Don't Open a Credibility Gap: If It Turns out the President Is Bluffing about 'Serious Consequences,' What Will Happen the Next Time the United States Makes Threats?
Byline: Fareed Zakaria In the world of foreign policy, the word "credibility" is a damaged good. When a policymaker says we should do something "to maintain our credibility," it conjures up a tragic event--Vietnam. The experts all agree we foolishly...
Falling to Earth: As America Mourned the Loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia's Brave Crew, the Search Began in Earnest-For the Remains of a Fateful Day and the Scientific Reasons for What Went Wrong
Byline: Mark Hosenball and Jerry Adler From the California coast, where the space shuttle Columbia first began reporting anomalies back to the ground, to western Louisiana, the place where the last pieces appear to have fallen, is 2,000 miles, more...
Friendship and Rivalry: Matisse and Picasso Were the Two Greatest Artists of the 20th Century. They've Been Shown Together Before-But Never as Stunningly as in This Grand Exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art
Byline: Peter Plagens Squeezed into its MOMA-in-exile headquarters in a rehabilitated Queens, N.Y, factory, the Museum of Modern Art will permit fewer than 4,000 people a day to get a look at its blockbuster exhibition "Matisse Picasso." That'll...
Getting the Lead Out: Lawsuits in Rhode Island and Elsewhere Aim to Make Paint Companies Pay to Clean Up Their Poison Past
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley Like most 7-year-old boys, Sammy Colon loves to play soccer and watch "Spider-Man" videos. But Sammy doesn't much resemble a superhero. He weighs in at 37 pounds--just 11 more than his 3-year-old brother. He wears eyeglasses...
Imagining the Day After: Winning on the Battlefield May Be a Cakewalk Compared with Securing the Peace. Inside Washington's Postwar Blueprint for the Future of Iraq
Byline: Michael Hirsh and Melinda Liu The old U.S. embassy in Baghdad hasn't hosted an American ambassador since April Glaspie shipped out just before the 1991 gulf war. Located down an alley in a bustling commercial area of Baghdad, Glaspie's office...
Judging the Case: New Threats from Al Qaeda Lead to a High-Threat Alert as Powell Lays out the Evidence for a War against Iraq. the Proof-And What's Ahead
Byline: Richard Wolffe and Daniel Klaidman It was only a fake, a prop thrown into his speech for the benefit of the cameras. But Colin Powell's small vial of simulated anthrax was still too hot to handle for his aides as they flew to New York. In...
Mail Call: All's Not Fear on the War Front
Much like the national mood, there was no consensus on our Feb. 3 cover story, "Hell Bent on War." Some readers praised the cover photo of the soldier for what one said "reflects the collective dread of millions of Americans." Another wished that the...
Marvelous Makeover: The Comic-Book Company Took a Beating. but It's Back, Flexing Big Muscles
Byline: N'gai Croal Who is Daredevil? As a kid he was blinded by biomedical waste. He later discovered that his other senses were heightened and began developing them into superhuman abilities. He's been a second-tier hero for decades, but on Friday,...
Military Justice: Saddam's Crimes: Beatings, Whippings, Electric Shock, Acid Baths: Will the Dictator and His Henchmen Ever Face Trial?
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Donatella Lorch Marine Corps Capt. Michael Craig Berryman had been held captive for less than a day and already his face was bruised and bloody from constant beatings. It was about 5 p.m. on Jan. 28, 1991, and the...
Money: New Rules of the Hunt
Byline: Linda Stern Last year James Shaw was pounding the virtual pavement. The 39-year-old programmer from Roswell, Ga., put up his resume on the Internet job site Monster.com and got "not a sniff" over three months. After hearing too many stories...
Newsmakers
Byline: David Gates with Ginanne Brownell in London; Allison Samuels The King of Pop's Latest Moonwalk We swore after he dangled the baby, no more Michael Jackson for the next year. But when a guy who looks like the Tin Man tells the world how...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom, left to right: CNN, (Australia) Herald Sun, Associated Press, Variety, CBS News, The Hill, Associated Press, Boston Herald, L.A. Times, Boston Globe, Boston Herald "Al Qaeda is still determined to attack...
Photography: Picture Perfect
Byline: Malcolm Jones It's not the whole truth, but a good part of the reason William Henry Fox Talbot became one of the fathers of photography was that he could not draw well. Talbot (1800-1877) grew up at a time when people sketched picturesque...
Sizing Up the Savings Plans: The Big Winners Would Be People Living at the Top of Money Peak. the Losers? Lower-Paid Workers Might Be Cut out of Company Plans
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Saving money tax-free? Who could resist? With war fever climbing and stocks still running scared, President Bush has popped a surprise on American savers. He proposes to simplify the crazy patchwork of savings plans on...
Supreme Court: Moving on, Moving in, Moving Up
Byline: Daniel Klaidman, Debra Rosenberg and Tamara Lipper It's been nine years since the last vacancy opened up on the U.S. Supreme Court. That historically long drought could end this year with at least one resignation. Eager White House aides...
The Best Design Is One We Haven't Seen: My Husband Died at Ground Zero, but I'd Rather the Rebuilt Site Celebrate His Life Than Focus on His Death
Byline: Kai Thompson Ground Zero is my husband's only tomb. How should we honor him and the other 2,791 who died there without gratifying their murderers? How can we commemorate the horror of that attack without creating a monument to the massacre...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker With this issue, NEWSWEEK turns 70. A look at our first edition, dated Feb. 17, 1933, shows how much has changed over the years. The original title had a hyphen: News-Week. The cover featured seven news photos, one for each...
The Real Leonardo: His Drawings Show Why He Was Such a Genius
Byline: Peter Plagens Do you remember that strange left-handed, long-haired kid in study hall, the one who could do that stupid backward "mirror handwriting" and drew all the time? The one whose father was a notary public and kept trying to set...
The Svengali and the Starlet: Legendary Pop Producer Phil Spector and Slain B-Movie Queen Lana Clarkson Were Two L.A.-Noir Exiles
Byline: Lorraine Ali An eccentric, rich has-been tycoon. A buxom, blond B-movie actress. A call to the cops by the chauffeur. A shooting death in a hilltop mansion. It's a 1940s L.A. noir movie--about all it needs is the shadow of Venetian blinds--but...
The Tax Cut Ate Granny's Check
Byline: Allan Sloan If you've ever heard the riff about how to boil a frog, you'd understand what President Bush's economic and tax proposals are all about. You don't just toss the frog into a pot of boiling water, because even the foggiest frog...