Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 28

A Husband in Trouble: A Missing-Persons Probe Becomes a Murder Case
Byline: Andrew Murr and Nadine Joseph Scott Peterson was determined to play golf Friday morning, even as forensic scientists were still figuring out whether two corpses that washed up in San Francisco Bay last week were those of his missing wife,...
Calls That Follow You Anywhere: Verizon Makes a New Vow to Marry Phones to the PC
Byline: Mary Carmichael It's one of the most maddening features of all the technology in our lives. There are so many gadgets to connect us--cell phones, e-mail, land-line phones--yet most of the gadgets aren't connected to each other. Verizon's...
Dubya's Next Shot: The War May Be Winding Down, but the Political Battles Are Just Beginning
Byline: Howard Fineman George W. Bush thrives on regular order. In his meticulously managed Washington, nothing political is supposed to occur without the say-so of Karl Rove, officer in charge of presidential re-election. There was, accordingly,...
Froufrous with 'Tude: Contemporary American Designers Strut Their Stuff
Byline: Peter Plagens Don't expect to find America's very best-designed industrial products in the new show at New York's Cooper-Hewitt design museum: they've been dropped on Iraq. But the "National Design Triennial: Inside Design Now," which opens...
Hot Bytes, by the Dozen: Krispy Kreme's Web Portal Keeps Franchises Humming
Byline: Catharine Skipp Krispy Kreme calls it "doughnut theater.'' And the sight and smell of one of its center-stage doughnut machines, which can fry and glaze as many as 2,600 doughnuts an hour, create such an opening-day stampede that police...
Newsmakers
Byline: Sean M. Smith, Jac Chebatoris Weaving a Tangled Web Is Tobey Maguire getting too big for his unitard? The $4 million he got for "Spider-Man" looked good at the time. But when the film made $404 million, the Gersh Agency, which has repped...
'No Job Is Safe. Never Will Be.': Business Experts Talk to Readers about the Economy, Tech Trends and More
For NEWSWEEK's Online Forum "Facing the Future," a panel of experts--from the CIO of Krispy Kreme to an author of best-selling business books--took part in a four-day online discussion with readers about the future of business. Here are excerpts from...
Office Space: Designing Your Next Office: A Workplace That Will Know Who You Are, Where You Are and What You're Doing
Byline: Brad Stone Mark Golan can't find an empty conference room. An exec at Silicon Valley tech giant Cisco, he's towing a reporter around trying to locate an unoccupied meeting area. Golan is in charge of overseeing the design of the next generation...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: New York Times, CNN, The Washington Post, Associated Press, The Hill, Knight Ridder, Ananova, Arizona Republic, Reuters, Los Angeles Times "Our region has suffered more than its share of wars." Saudi...
Rethinking Buy-and-Hold
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn No God-given tablet says that investing should be made easy. In the years running up to the 2000 market peak, any dummy could make money in stocks, and did. But history is pocked with long periods when it's tough to scratch...
Show Me the Money
Byline: Mark Hosenball As a young man, Barzan al-Tikriti was "excessively violent and lazy," say U.S. officials. As chief spy for his older half-brother Saddam Hussein in the early 1980s, Barzan's name was synonymous with cruelty: intelligence reports...
Smugness Is Our Greatest Enemy
Byline: Jonathan Alter I know it's a common complaint, but why can't people ever admit that their side might be wrong? The doves can't admit they were wrong about the rightness of freeing 24 million Iraqis, however chaotic the aftermath. And the...
Squeezing out Seconds: New Tools Help FedEx Turn Time Saved into Big Profits
Byline: Emily Yellin Talk about a tough bunch of customers. When FedEx first introduced overnight package service in the 1970s, it was a pretty nifty trick. Today, it's not enough to just deliver 3.5 million packages per day around the world with...
Styling with Digital Clay: Far-Flung Car Designers Connect in a Virtual Studio
Byline: Keith Naughton Volvo chief designer Peter Horbury saw the inside of his own concept car for the first time at the Geneva Motor Show last month. In the past, Horbury would have had his hands all over one of his creations as it was coming...
Tapping New Technology to Keep Money Flowing: Fidelity Invests Heavily-In Its Own Computer Systems
Byline: Ken Shulman When Steve Elterich started working in tech at Fidelity Investments 15 years ago, one of his main concerns was simply keeping the phone lines open. Now he's president of Fidelity's eBusiness division, and Elterich keeps an eye...
The CEO's Challenge: With the Bull Market a Distant Memory, CEOs Are Keeping a Lower Profile, Cheerleading for Employees and Focusing on New Ways to Make Money in Tough Times
Byline: Daniel McGinn Early one morning around Christmastime, Rick Wagoner was running on the treadmill in his suburban Detroit home, flipping TV channels. Way up the cable dial he came across an old movie he'd never seen: "Roger & Me." In the...
The Connected Company: How New Technologies Are Giving Successful Businesses, and the CEOs Who Run Them, a Competitive Advantage
Byline: Steven Levy To understand how business runs in the 21st century, just look at the business end of the military. It's all about connectedness. Connections to outsiders lead to vital information: Saddam-istas in a compound near a Baghdad restaurant....
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker Every successful war depends on skilled battle commanders. In our journalistic campaign to cover Operation Iraqi Freedom, we've had three: Senior Editors Jeffrey Bartholet, Tom Watson and Marcus Mabry. Every day for the past...
The Iranian Connection: Tehran's Agents Have Poured into Southern Iraq, Where Anti-American Sentiment Is Spreading among the Shiites
Byline: Scott Johnson and Owen Matthews At first glance, Abdulaziz Hakim seems to be exactly the kind of friend George W. Bush needs in southern Iraq. The Shiite leader has spent decades fighting Saddam Hussein. On a visit to Washington last August...
The Politics of Vengeance
Byline: George F. Will Many members of the House and Senate say they ran for office out of love--of justice, equality, peace, the American way, etc. James Inhofe says he ran for Congress in 1986 for "vengeance." In a city full of people who pretend...
The Road to Damascus: The Syrians Know Well the Black Art of Terrorism. but They've Also Been Key Allies against Al Qaeda
Byline: Tom Masland and Richard Wolffe The call went out from the mosques of Lebanon's Bekaa Valley as the Iraq war began: the time had come to defend Islam. And Zein Ali Othman answered. The unemployed 38-year-old veteran of the Lebanese Army,...
The Saddam Files: At the Iraqi Intelligence Service, a Man Walked Up with a Grimy Sack of Documents and Tapes. 'Tell the World What Happened Here,' He Said
Byline: Melinda Liu, Rod Nordland and Evan Thomas After 9-11, as talk of war against Iraq picked up in Washington, the Iraqi Intelligence Service (IIS) became jittery. On Oct. 29, 2002, a memo from Directorate 14 (in charge of special operations...
The X Factor: Big Talent. Bit of a Temper. 'X2' Director Bryan Singer Is Hollywood's Hottest Variable
Byline: Sean M. Smith I shouldn't even be talking about this," Bryan Singer says. It's late on a Sunday night, and the 37-year-old director of "X2: X-Men United," is nursing a vodka and tonic at Orso, in Los Angeles. Two hours ago he made his final...
Tracking SARS: With Technology and a Global Mission, Scientists Nailed This Bug in Seven Weeks. Curing It Will Be Much Harder
Byline: Claudia Kalb It was 2:30 a.m. on Saturday, March 15, when Dr. Michael Ryan, a contagious-disease specialist at the World Health Organization in Geneva, was jolted out of bed by a phone call. The WHO's regional office in Manila was on the...
What Do Patients Want?
Byline: Julie Halpert I was lying on a gurney, trying to prepare myself for a six-hour breast-reconstruction surgery. A few months earlier, I'd had a mastectomy for breast cancer. Because I'm small-boned, my doctor told me I needed to have a muscle...
Whatever Happened to Vive la Difference? the Protests May Be Silly (the Belgians Invented French Fries!), but None of Us Should Be Laughing
Byline: Sebastien Taveau For several minutes I sat quietly as a potential client of mine carried on about the war in Iraq and called the French cowards for not supporting the United States. But then he brought up the story of the Iraqi man who risked...