Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from October 20

Advice from Rudy: Hizzoner Says Asia's Challenges Can Be Met with Preparation and a Bit of New York Chutzpah
Byline: Rudolph Giuliani No two cities are exactly alike. Some of the challenges facing Asia's mayors are the same as those I faced in New York--crime, large numbers of newcomers and improving long-neglected basic infrastructure, like roads and...
Arnold's Earthquake: The Actor Stayed True to His Script, and Sent Shock Waves across the Political Landscape. Are the Tremors Heading for the White House Next?
Byline: Howard Fineman and Karen Breslau If this were what they call in Hollywood a "buddy-buddy actioner," the script would open with a split screen of the leading men, one on each coast, sweating through their workouts before checking in with...
At the Top: Increasingly, Asia's Course Is Being Charted by Its Booming Cities-And a Crop of Brash Mayors
Byline: George Wehrfritz Shintaro Ishihara is an inveterate showman. But the flamboyant governor of Tokyo deserves headlines for more than bashing North Korea every chance he gets. Since taking office in 1999, he's reined in runaway spending that...
Battling the Bulge: Asia's Mounting Health Crisis Stems as Much from Local Delicacies as from McDonald's
Byline: Alexandra A. Seno Dr. Tommaso Cavalli-Sforza would like diners in Asia to hold the salt. And some of the meat. And, while they're at it, the fat and sugar, too. "If people here continue to eat the way they do, the consequences will be serious,"...
Big-Budget Thriller: An Action Hero Vows to Slay the Budget Demons. Special Effects, Anyone?
Byline: Allan Sloan Arnold Schwarzenegger has zero experience in government, but his many film roles may have prepared him well for the task of straightening out California's budget mess. He's been the Terminator, who blows up anything that gets...
Building Up: China's Biggest Cities Are Struggling to Balance Modern Design with Their Historical Structures
Byline: Cathleen McGuigan Shanghai is a city with a split personality. In little more than a decade its modern financial district, Pudong, has sprouted dozens of shiny glass-and-steel skyscrapers--most of them mundane, and a few over the top, such...
Bush, Nixon and History: Every President Tries to Juice the Economy in the Year Leading Up to a Re-Election Campaign. Nixon Actually Did. Bush Just Might Match Him
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson George W. Bush's quest to overcome a weak economy and win a second term offers some interesting parallels with previous presidents. The most obvious is with his father, who lost reelection in 1992 because he seemed indifferent...
China's Torrid Trio: Three Chinese Internet Stocks Are Heading for Boom-Year Highs, and Maybe Another Bust
Byline: Sarah Schafer Internet stocks are already retro chic, none more than those with a made in china label. The big three Chinese Internet portals--Sina, Sohu, and Netease--went public on New York's NASDAQ exchange at the worst possible time,...
Do the Math: Asia Is Discovering That the Only 'Growth Triangles' That Seem to Work Are China's
Byline: Rana Foroohar For a while in the 1980s and 1990s, economic planners in Asia were inordinately fond of geometry. They spoke grandiosely of "growth triangles," "hubs and spokes" and urban corridors--ways of forging cross-border links that...
Field of Dreams: Migrant Workers in China Are Going Home and Setting Up Shop
Byline: Melinda Liu Liu Yonghong had never seen--or heard--anything like it. A little more than 10 years ago this migrant worker from Sichuan walked into a supermarket in Hangzhou, 75 miles from Shanghai. All the goods were neatly arranged on the...
Finding a Safe Bet: Asian Companies Have Discovered Ways to Make Mobile Phones Pay With-And Without-Gambling
Byline: Rana Foroohar Mobile-phone companies are always trying to sell you the next big thing. Phones that can stream football games, send you movie clips, download a new song or snap pictures are what beleaguered telecom operators hope will bring...
Get a Move On: Led by Tokyo, Cities Are Turning to Wireless Technology to Untangle Their Traffic Jams
Byline: Anna Kuchment Before leaving to meet his friend for dinner the other night, Sakae Fujimoto checked the local traffic report. Instead of flipping stations on the radio, he booted up his in-car navigation system. "Where would you like to go?"...
Getting into College, Whatever It Takes: When Parents, Professional Editors and Counselors Lend a Hand, How Personal Is the Personal Essay?
Byline: May Akabogu-Collins My son, Rocky, is a high-school senior who is applying to colleges. I am already overwhelmed by the process. What he must do to get into a good school! Provide recommendations, fill out financial-aid forms, take the inevitable...
Health: Breast Cancer's 'New Era'
Byline: David Noonan Breast cancer patients deserve good news, and they got a nice helping of it last week when a large, international clinical trial was halted early because the drug being tested was found to dramatically reduce the risk of relapse....
Heir Heads: Reality TV Is Obsessed with People Trying to Get Rich. but What about People Who Were Born Rich? You're Going to Be Sorry You Asked
Byline: Marc Peyser and B. J. Sigesmund The clingy dress, the Chanel belt, the denim mini-skirt--if they were cruising the clubs, Paris Hilton and Nicole Richie would be stunning. However, the Beverly Hills bombshells just relocated to Altus, Ark....
Hollywood Family Feud: Jack Valenti Says He Just Wants to Stop Piracy. So Why Do All the Little Guys Think He's Trying to Rig the Oscars?
Byline: Sean Smith and Devin Gordon They weren't just talking about Arnold last week, or wondering how Siegfried would cope without Roy. After all, Hollywood has been engaged in one of the ugliest family spats in years--pitting directors against...
"I Am Addicted to Prescription Pain Medication": True Confessions: Limbaugh Built an Army of Admirers with His Hard-Right Rants. but Off-Air, He Was a Lonely Man Who May Have Broken the Law to Feed His Addiction. the Real Rush
Byline: Evan Thomas Rush Limbaugh has always had far more followers than friends. Bombastic and clowning on air, shy and bumptious off it, Limbaugh could count on 20 million "Dittoheads" and talk-radio fans to tune in five days a week. But it's...
Interview: Striking A Chord: Schwarzenegger Savors His Win and Revs Up for Sacramento
Byline: Karen Breslau After winning California's recall election in a landslide last week, Arnold Schwarzenegger spoke with NEWSWEEK's Karen Breslau. Excerpts: Breslau: Your victory over Governor Davis was a result in part of the tremendous anger...
In the Grip of a Deeper Pain: Opioids: For People with Chronic Suffering, These Powerful Pills Are a Godsend. for Others, They're a Prescription for Abuse and Misery
Byline: Jerry Adler They were invented to stop pain, the kind that travels up the spinal cord, and they're remarkably effective at it: the synthetic opioids developed since the 1970s can mute the agony of slipped disks, deteriorating joints, tooth...
Music: Al, This One's for You, Bud
Byline: Bret Begun Releasing a greatest-hits CD can signal the end's near. But R.E.M. has a new album due in '04 and two new tracks on "In Time" (Oct. 28), a best-of reaching back to 1988's "Green," a.k.a. the album that gave us that "Stand" dance....
Newsmakers: Vegas: Star Tissue
Byline: Steve Friess, Vanessa Juarez Late last week Roy Horn was still fighting for his life in a Las Vegas hospital, and experts were debating why a white tiger mauled him onstage on his 59th birthday. The "Siegfried & Roy" show was permanently...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: MSNBC, Associated Press, Guardian, The Hill, Reuters, The Washington Post (2), Slate, New York Times, Reuters, New York Times, Reuters "You can be a Muslim and support democracy." Human-rights activist...
Road Warrior: Advances in Travel Gear Will Make Doing Business Easier
Byline: Rana Foroohar With the rise of manufacturing in China and the exodus of back-office jobs to India, more and more executives are finding themselves in more and more places in Asia. The barriers to doing business aren't only cultural: technological...
Rumsfeld Bares His Fangs: Usually, the SecDef Dishes out the Bureaucratic Punishment. Last Week He Got a Little Payback. Deconstructing a Dis
Byline: Evan Thomas and Tamara Lipper Defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld is known for his brusqueness with the press. But for Rumsfeld to be snippy with reporters about national-security adviser Condoleezza Rice was, to say the least, unusual and...
Rush, to Judgment: It's Been a Bad Year for Bully-Boy Conservatives. Time for Them to Taste Their Own Bitter Medicine
Byline: Jonathan Alter If you listen hard, you can hear the booming voice: Look, the Clinton liberals and feminazis won't tell you, but here's the problem with this big talk-show host who turns out to be a prescription- drug junkie. You have a guy...
Shorts
Byline: David H. Freedman, David Wolman, Tim Culpan In-Flight Insurance Squeamish flyers have probably wondered why the airlines don't hand out parachutes along with the crummy food and headphones. Not a bad idea, if it weren't for the prospect...
Still Needing the F Word: The Point Is Not That the World Has Not Changed for Women since Friedan's Book. It Hasn't Changed as Much as We like to Tell Ourselves
Byline: Anna Quindlen Let's use the f word here. People say it's inappropriate, offensive, that it puts people off. But it seems to me it's the best way to begin, when it's simultaneously devalued and invaluable. Feminist. Feminist, feminist,...
Subterranean City: Packed to the Gills Aboveground, Tokyo Looks to Expand Its Skyline below the Earth's Surface
Byline: George Wehrfritz and Kay Itoi Forget concrete jungles. Think glass-and-steel icebergs--huge, complex structures largely hidden beneath the surface. That, say urban planners in Tokyo, is the future of the city. With 27 million residents,...
The Bureau: Tensions in the FBI: Why Was This Agent Fired?
Byline: Michael Isikoff Gamal Abdel-Hafiz was once considered one of the FBI's best assets: an Egyptian-born agent who worked big terrorism probes. But last summer Abdel-Hafiz, 44, was fired for allegedly lying about an allegation of long-ago insurance...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker For more than a decade, we've documented the rise of conservative talk radio and its leader figure, Rush Limbaugh ("The Power of Talk," Feb. 8, 1993). And two years ago, we were the first national magazine to do a cover story...
The Fast Track to Sainthood: How This Diminutive Nun Got Beatified a Record Seven Years after Her Death
Byline: Kenneth L. Woodward John Paul II loves a good party and this week in Rome the party is for him. For the 25th anniversary of his election to the papacy, John Paul has called all 195 cardinals of the church to join in the celebration--including...
The First Lady: The Inoculator: How Maria Shriver Helped Shield Her Husband's Achilles' Heel
Byline: Karen Breslau Looking Jackie O-perfect in her white shoulderless cocktail dress last Tuesday night, Maria Shriver seemed to have finally overcome any lingering qualms about her husband's political ambitions. Flanked by her beaming parents...
The Games Begin: Five Years before Its Olympic Debut, Beijing Is Already Struggling with Its Ambitious Makeover
Byline: Sarah Schafer Follow the green-brown waters of the Qing River toward eastern Beijing, and it begins to look like little more than a polluted stream of sludge. Follow it west, though, and the water turns clear. If Beijing's Olympic planners...
The Lost Lucy Letter: Words of Warmth from FDR's Great Secret Love
Byline: Jon Meacham Roosevelt and Churchill first met, very briefly, in the summer of 1918. FDR was assistant secretary of the Navy, on a tour of England and the European front; Churchill was minister of munitions. On Roosevelt's return, his wife,...
The Small Screen: Television Is Luring Asians to the City-And Shaping Expectations of What They'll Find There
Byline: Sarah Schafer and Sudip Mazumdar Aalo Maity barely remembers life before her tiny Indian village got its first television set. She only remembers that after, life seemed unbearable. Every night she would gather with other villagers in a...
Why the War Was Right: We Had to Move. Either We Could Welcome Saddam Back into the Community of Nations, or We Could Rid Iraq of an Evil Dictatorship
Byline: Fareed Zakaria So, what do you think about it now?" it's a question I've been asked repeatedly over the past few weeks. The "it," of course, refers to the Iraq war. The war against Saddam may be over (mostly) on the banks of the Euphrates,...