Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 129, No. 11, March 17

A Bitter New Battle over Partial-Birth Abortions
Did pro-choice advocates distort statistics? EVEN BY THE HEATED STANDARDS OF the abortion debate, the arguments last year over partial-birth abortions were remarkably emotional. Right-to-life groups and their congressional allies portrayed these...
A Home's True Worth
Our old family house was a great investment in happy memories, not in moneymaking RECENTLY AT A CONDOMINIUM-ASSOCIATION MEETING, a neighbor complained about the devaluation of our units If she sold her condo today she would lose close to $25,000...
Bound and Gagged: HMOs Need to Be Reformed - but in the Right Way
ANY WORKPLACE DRONE KNOWS that fighting with the boss isn't the best, way to keep a job. But what if you re a doctor who believes your boss is messing up your patient? Consider the physician in Tulsa, Okla., who prescribed a sophisticated magneticresonance...
Brand Power: An Inside Look at How a Former Cookie Peddler Is Helping GM's Marketing Lineup
A YEAR AGO GENERAL MOTORS WAS putting the finishing touches on the Jimmy Ultimate, a luxury version of its popular sport utility vehicle. Then Jeff Cohen came to town, and he didn't like what he saw. Cohen, fresh from a job marketing Snackwell cereal...
Dimming the Sun: The Alliance of Japanese Bureaucrats and Businessmen Doesn't Work So Well Anymore
GODZILLA WAS ON A RAMPAGE--or so it seemed. By the early 1990s Japan was gobbling up everything in sight, from Rockefeller Center to Hollywood studios. American homes were filled with gadgets made by Panasonic, Sony, Toshiba, Pioneer. But the ultimate...
Dueling on the Ice
Skating needed a rivalry, and now it has one. Who will be the next Ice Princess? (Neither is old enough to be a Queen.) BEFORE AMERICA BEGAN SUCH a mad love affair with figure skating that everyone seemed willing to watch anybody skate against anyone...
Exiles on Main St
When the Nazis forced Europe s greatest artists into exile, they started an American renaissance. A new exhibition in Los Angeles tells how. HITLER WASTED NO TIME AT all. In 1933, his first year in power, he forced 20,000 Jews to flee. He also founded...
Falling out of the Sky: For the Navy's First Female Combat Pilots, the Problem Wasn't Sexual Harassment - It Was the Silent Treatment
LT. (J.G.) CAREY LOHRENZ WANTED to fit in. She was willing to put up with the loutish behavior of her fellow pilots, the misogynist jokes and the male strutting. She understood why naval aviators sometimes act like fraternity boys. Landing a 35-ton,...
Groping for a Strategy
The mystery of McVeigh's alleged 'confession' raises questions about how strong his defense really is FIRST HE SAID HE DIDN'T KNOW anything about it. Then he said it was a hoax. And then Stephen Jones, the combative Enid, Okla., lawyer who in just...
Hard to the Hoop; NBA Players Take the Generation Gap to Extremes
NBA players take the generation gap to extremes FEB. 8 SHOULD HAVE BEEN THE night of Allen Iverson's life. He'd won the MVP award at the NBA's rookie all-star game. Now it was time to celebrate. While the older players were across town, partying...
Homeless on the Range
Bison are protected if they stay within Yellowstone. But if they roam out, state livestock agents will shoot them. WITH THE BEST OF INTENTIONS, Yellowstone National Park became the country's first federally protected wildlife sanctuary in 1872....
How Much Is Too Much? Huge Checks Make Even Good CEOs Look Bad
Huge checks make even good CEOs look bad AH, SPRING IS JUST AROUND THE corner. For most people, it's the time of rebirth and renewal. But for financial voyeurs, this is Wretched Excess season, that glorious time of year when corporations with public...
North versus South
With violence increasing, protest against the government turns into something very' like a civil war THE FISHERMEN OF VLORE ARE fishing with hand grenades these days. There's precious little food in the Albanian port, now that anti-government protests...
Revenge of the Irish Lord
Michael Flatley stomps into the States, lawsuits in tow THERE ARE SOME PEOPLE WHO DO not talk to reporters. Performers who have been dumped by famous shows. People who fire and sue their well-known manager. People whom the manager sues back. None...
Rx: Thirty Minutes on the StairMaster Twice Weekly: Hospitals Court the Sweaty Set with Health Clubs
Hospitals court the sweaty set with health clubs HE HOTTEST NEW HEALTH CLUB IN Geneva, Ill., doesn't look anything like the gyms advertised on TV. In those unsubtle commercials, brawny men pump iron while shapely women ooze sweat as they strut through...
Smuggling People: How a Star U.S. Official Found Himself on the Dark Side of the Global Immigration Game
BY THE TIME THE flight to Hong Kong had reached 30,000 feet, Jerry Stuchiner's right eye bad stopped its nervous twitching. The 45-year-old officer for the Immigration and Naturalization Service could finally relax as his many troubles--the dark accusations...
Stonewall Jackson's House
IF YOU GET TO SEE JONATHAN reynolds's Stonewall Jackson's House, hang on to your shibboleths, those precious beliefs that we think are unshakable truths. Reynolds is the best shibboleth shaker to hop onto a stage in a long time. The stage is at New...
Strawberry Fields Don't Last Forever
SOMEWHERE, PROBABLY IN the mountains of Montana where wild ideas roam along with the deer and antelope, there are people who believe that the world is going to change when the Cosmic Odometer clicks over into the year 2000. The trumpet shall sound,...
The Capitalist Czars: The Business Elite Who Could Be the Post-Soviet Economy's Best Hope
HE DEAL WAS DONE QUIETLY IN manner suggesting that oil companies worth about $2 billion routinely end up in the hands of 33-year-old former members of the Communist Youth League. Which in Moscow, six years after Russia's second revolution, they...
The Good Son Stumbles: For Al Gore, Campaign 2000 Just Started - Badly
AL GORE HAS ALWAYS been a rising star, a good son. At St. Albans School in Washington, he was a senator's boy who had it all--the football captain with the good grades, the cute girlfriend and the Harvard acceptance letter. "He was our idol," recalls...
The New Generation Gap
Black families in the '90s are divided, as whites were in the '60s. And hip-hop is their Vietnam. AS YOU ENTER THE BUSSEY FAMILY home in Inglewood, Calif.. you can smell the gumbo, thick and pungent. Joanne, 59. comes from Louisiana, and she serves...
'We Are Losing.' (Actor-Comedian Bill Cosby)(Interview)(Cover Story)
Bill Cosby speaks out about black kids, hip-hop chic and his son, Ennis, an agent of change' The words HELLO FRIEND welcome you into Bill Cosby's dressing room at the Kaufman-Astoria studio in Queens, N.Y. A bright, multicolor sign bears that greeting,...
With Friends like These
It isn't just the president who has to worry about controversial cash and dubious donors. Now the vice president and the First Lady do, too. HE WOULD CALL FROM THE LOBBY OF THE OLD EXECUTIVE Office Building--just yards from the White House. Johnny...