Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 132, No. 22, November 30

AOL's Netscape Romance: Will Two Web Giants Tie the Knot?
As if microsoft didn't have enough head-aches, two of the software giant's craftiest and most potent Internet rivals may be about to join forces. Newsweek has learned that America Online, by far the country's largest online company, may buy Netscape...
Battling the Bugs in Air Traffic
A computer switch worries controllers Early evening is a nerve-rack- ing time for air-traffic controllers, the hours when the skies are filled with planes vying for airspace around the country's airports. Inside the Terminal Radar Approach Control...
Beyond the 'Big Box': This Year Shoppers Go for Offbeat and Low-Key
So after last year's fiasco, when you scoured Toys "R" Us for Sing & Snore Ernie but couldn't find the right aisle, much less a salesperson, you swore off toy superstores. Don't be haunted by the ghost of Christmas past. Fans say ZanyBrainy (72...
Bill in the Bull's Eye
Competitors are ganging up on it. The government may try to split it into little pieces. But get real: there's still no reason to begin a Microsoft death watch. Can microsoft be had? Only a few months ago someone expressing such a thought in Silicon...
Buying a Pig in a Poke
More trouble for Edgar Bronfman's showbiz foray The call was prompted by a story in the Los An- geles Times. But Edgar Bronfman Jr., Seagram CEO and would-be entertainment mogul, didn't want to talk about the matter by phone. That's when the caller,...
Call It a Critical Beating
A hip-hop magazine editor says that a rap producer assaulted him. Join the club. Who knew that being a magazine editor had such an occupational hazard? Just ask 29-year-old Jesse Washington, editor of the new rap magazine Blaze. According to Washington,...
Cancer & Diet: Can You Eat to Beat Malignancy? A Controversial Diet Book Is Just One Sign of the Revolutionary New Thinking about Food and Health
Dr. mitchell gaynor knew a lot about cancer when he finished his oncology training at Cornell Medical Center, but he didn't know much about food. So he was flabbergasted when he showed up at Rockefeller University in 1986, for a postdoctoral fellowship...
Dash: Why I Left Starr
The Watergate icon lays out the reasons he quit--and rebuts charges of conspiracy After his surprise resignation as Ken Starr's ethics counsel, Samuel Dash explained his decision in written answers to Newsweek's Daniel Klaidman. Excerpts: Why...
Deadly Days for Wolves
An animal murder mystery unfolds in the West The first hint of trouble with wolf 532 came when his radio collar began beeping rapidly on Nov. 7. The beeps meant the animal had been motionless for at least four hours, and that meant he was very probably...
'Dr. Death' Raises the Stakes-On TV
Even for the man known as Dr. Death, it was a surprisingly grim turn. First, Jack Kevorkian filmed himself helping a 52-year-old man to die, flouting a new Michigan law that bans assisted suicide. Then he arranged to send the tape to Mike Wallace so...
Heading for the Hills: Fear of the Y2K Bug Is Pushing Some to Extremes
True, the book of revelation never mentioned Charmin. But as Nate, a 46-year-old CPA, explains it, the basics will be important when computers fail in the year 2000 and the world is plunged into millennial chaos. "I guess I can use leaves if I need...
How Saddam Won This Round
By usurping the Pentagon's own theories of modern warfare, Iraq outsmarted the U.S. But this crisis isn't over. The aborted military strike against iraq may say more about the future of war than any combat encounter of the past decade. In today's...
In History's Bedchamber
Though they'll hate it, Clinton and Starr are forever connected as the bookends of an era In her memoirs, the late Virginia Kelley, the president's mother, recalls how she laughed at the thought of a Baptist minister's seeing her gardening on Sundays...
Just Don't Shoot the Client
How do you train Nintendo-generation workers? Marc prensky's epiphany came during a routine airline flight. "Everyone was sitting there, laptops open, playing solitaire. 'How could we make this useful?' I wondered." And so a business was born. Prensky,...
Managing Hollywood: Michael Ovitz Eyes a Return to the Agency-Er, Management-Business
When michael ovitz left his Hollywood talent agency three years ago, he scornfully told his partners, "being an agent is like being a waiter." Now look who may be asking, "Lemon with your tea?" The man who dominated Hollywood for most of the past two...
Odyssey of a Passionate Radical
An old friend and respectful rival of Stokely Carmichael's chronicles the late activist's journey from nonviolence to raw militancy. I first met stokely carmichael in the summer of 1961, during the Freedom Rides. At the time, he was a student and...
Return to Phi Slama Jama
Can Clyde Drexler coach his alma mater back to glory? Clyde (the glide) drexler was not even moving. In the final seconds of his coaching debut last week, he was frozen on the sidelines in his pin-striped suit, having assumed the basketball coach's...
Right Stuff: Getting Kids to Eat Better
You say tofu, they say later. How to feed their needs. It's one thing to start eating broccoli yourself, but getting your kids to dabble in the green stuff? No easy task, we know. But consider what American children are eating, and you might be...
Science & Technology: Let the Future Begin
This week Newsweek launches a new section, science & technology, to chronicle the way new developments in technology and the sciences are transforming how all of us live, work and think. From the war over Microsoft to unlocking the secrets of the...
"She Must Have Other Talents Because It Sure Isn't Speech."
San Francisco voice coach Penny Wayte, after analyzing Monica Lewinsky's voice "We have made no attempt to influence public opinion. Isn't it obvious?" Charles Bakaly, spokesman for Independent Counsel Ken Starr " [Republicans] thought that impeachment...
Taking No Prisoners
Lucy Liu has energized 'Ally McBeal' this season, stealing scenes as the sharky, litigious Ling Woo Lucy liu was so perfectly cast as Ling Woo that she can't even understand why the other characters in "Ally McBeal" hate Ling so much. Despite the...
The Amazing Smoke Screen
The anti-tobacco crusade is a reverse Robin Hood arrangement. It robs the poor to pay the rich. We may have closure--at least temporar- ily--to the anti-smoking crusade of the 1990s. The agreement between state attorneys general and the tobacco...
The Apples of Their Eyes
On TV, Mac spells c-o-o-l Personal computers running Windows may far outnumber Macs in homes and offices, but you'd never guess that from watching TV. "Ally McBeal," "Felicity" and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" have all featured Apple's new curvaceous...
The Inner Life of Dinosaurs: Scientists Find a Trove of Eggs Frozen in Time
They were headed for distant badlands, prospecting for fossils. But when the team of paleontologists crested a ridge last year and saw a flat stretch of undisturbed desert in front of them, they stopped short. The bare mudstone weathering in the Argentine...
The Second Coming: Fans Flock to Theaters to See the New 'Star Wars' Trailer-And Split before 'Meet Joe Black'
Never doubt the force. in "star Wars" legend, the energy field created by all living things helped Luke Skywalker destroy the Death Star and ultimately bring the Empire to its knees. Last week on Earth, it induced thousands of people to fork over nine...
The Starr Chamber
The prosecutor makes his case, but impeachment is now an endgame with no game plan. Where to go from here? Kenneth starr was back on familiar ter- ritory--under attack in his own driveway. The day before, he had shown the world that he was no power-mad...
The Trials of Mary Bono
Sonny's widow tries to make her mark in the wilds of Washington. Mary bono was nervous. she was neither a swift-witted lawyer nor a sharp-tongued pol and, as the most junior member of the House Judiciary Committee, she was the last lawmaker in line...
The Ultimate Thrill Ride
Say goodbye to boring old missions: astronauts are about to start assembling the International Space Station, the riskiest job they have ever undertaken. It happens every time one of rus-sia's unmanned Proton rockets blasts off from the Baikonur...
The Wild Things
A girl who shouts. A boy who won't take no for an answer. Rebels rule this year's roundup of children's books. Where should we start? There's the Homework Helper (ask him anything). There's H[sub]20 Flo, whose job it is to pass out straws. Herr...
Tired of All Those Passwords? Here Are Some Alternatives
Bill gates may be one of the smartest guys in the country, but even he's annoyed at having to remember a soup of personal passwords for activities like withdrawing money and going online. He also thinks they're insecure. At last week's Comdex computer...
Unbelievably Bad Behavior: The Comedy's Dark, but No Fun
We've been through radical chic, shabby chic and heroin chic. Now the black comedy Very Bad Things would like very badly to shock you with nastiness chic. Rarely has a movie tried so hard to rub our noses in the vileness of human nature. Writer-director...
Up from the Ashes
Poverty and crime still plague Soweto, South Africa's most infamous town- ship. But with surprising speed, hope is taking hold. Francina ngakane remem-bers when life in Soweto was chaos, punctuated by death. During the day, black youths clashed...
Where's the Panic? the Global Crisis May Not Be over. but It Sure Feels like It
Ahh, the sights and sounds of normalcy. On Wall Street, Internet stocks are again getting bid skyward--and deflating a week later like billion-dollar party balloons. Traders puffing on Montecristos are packing into tony steak-and-cigar saloons like...
Yellow Skies, Blue Trees?
I'm colorblind, but that doesn't mean my world is psychedelic--just confusing A fellow fourth grader broke the news to me after she saw my effort on a class assignment involving scissors and construction paper. "You cut out a purple bluebird," she...
Young, with Money to Run
How a student should manage the only inheritance likely to come along Question: I'm a university student, working more than part time and planning to graduate by 2000. Following the sudden death of my only parent, I received a large sum of life...