Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 134, No. 1, July 5

A Sharper Image of Bias: Three Major Disability Decisions Put Stricter Limits on Who Can Sue Employers for Discrimination in Hiring
When Vaughn Murphy took his physical for a mechanic's job with UPS, his blood pressure was high. But Murphy says he was able to work as long as he took his daily pills. So he was stunned when he was fired just a few weeks after he started. A company...
A Sweet-and-Sour Sandler: Father Doesn't Always Know Best in 'Big Daddy'
After "The Wedding Singer," which reinvented Adam Sandler as a sensitive sweetie with an uncanny resemblance to the young Bob Dylan, and his megahit "The Waterboy," which reverted him to anarchic-moronic adolescent form, you have to wonder which Adam...
Bonfire of the Ad Agencies: Marketers Explore the Psychology of Get-Rich-Quick
Never thought you'd envy a tow-truck driver? Neither did Bob Kerstetter or Steve Stone. But when two of the cofounders of Black Rocket, a two-year-old San Francisco ad agency, designed a campaign for Discover Brokerage, they created a working-class...
Casio Pocket Viewer; $179.99; casio.com</LINK>, Fuga eDiary; $149.95; Fuga.com, Royal daVinci; $99; Royal.com: If You Want to Get Digitally Organized, You Don't Have to Splurge on a Pricey Palm PC. Sub-$200 Electronic Organizers Do the Trick, Provided Your Needs Are Scaled Down, Too
If you want to get digitally organized, you don't have to splurge on a pricey palm PC. Sub-$200 electronic organizers do the trick, provided your needs are scaled down, too. SLIM Casio Pocket Viewer; $179.99; casio.com Casio just came out with a...
Dumb Luck on Wall Street: How Envying the Undeserving Rich Can Bring out Our Worst Instincts as Investors
When dummies score in the stock market, it's a hazard to everyone else's wealth. They're not really dummies, of course. They're friends and neighbors who bought winning tickets (soaring stocks) for Wall Street's greatest lottery ever. But why them...
For 'W,' Wonkery That Works: To Make 'Compassionate Conservatism' Real, Bush Should Borrow Some Ideas from a Liberal
George W. Bush has a bumper-sticker slogan for 2000, and it's a good one. "Compassionate conservatism" works in part because it helps voters of all stripes feel warm and friendly--not just toward the poor but toward themselves. Even troglodytes like...
Gentlepeople, Start Your Engines, Take a Fast Look, Huh? What Did He Say?, Some Words to Chew On
Some videogames reinforce positive values. midway's world driver Championship recruits racers onto teams, rewarding loyalty with better rides. Electronic Arts' Need For Speed: High Stakes forces drivers to budget winnings for snazzier autos. Fully...
Getting a Cyber Sweat: Most Gyms Suffer from a High Dropout Rate. So They're Turning to Technology to Combat Boredom-And Give You a Better Workout
Getting a Cyber Sweat Most gyms suffer from a high dropout rate. So they're turning to technology to combat boredom--and give you a better workout. By Jennifer Tanaka Haven't been to the gym in five weeks? Don't think your health club doesn't know...
Great Lake Effect: Just 30 Years Ago the Great Lakes Were Dying. Have We Saved Them Only to Lose Them Again?
Prowling the waters of Lake Superior last month, the 87-foot research vessel Blue Heron was closing in on its quarry: dozens of souped-up thermometers that scientists had thrown into the frigid lake 12 months before. Capt. Mike King, one eye on his...
'I Was So Frightened': In Pristina, on the Run from Marauding Serbs
Veton Surroi, 37, is the publisher of Koha Ditore, Kosovo's largest Albanian-language paper, and a leading advocate for Kosovar rights. In February he was a member of the Kosovar delegation at the failed Rambouillet talks between NATO and Yugoslavia....
Just Skip the User Manual: Interactive Instructions Make Gadgets Easier to Master
SOFTWARE Just Skip the User Manual Interactive instructions make gadgets easier to master There's nothing like the thrill of coming home from your local electronics store with the latest gadget--until you open one of those impenetrable manuals and...
Missy's Back with Real-World Raps: She Dishes about Hip-Hop, Her Cupcake Diet and How Eavesdropping Can Yield a Hit Song
If Chuck D was right when he said that rap music is the black community's CNN, then Missy (Misdemeanor) Elliott is a black woman's version of Lifetime. Her songs have more drama than a soap opera during sweeps month. The territory Elliott mines is...
My Dead Dog May Already Be a Winner! We Put Our Dog's Name in the Phone Book-And the Junk Mail and Telemarketing Calls Poured In
Ever wonder what happens when a pet takes on a persona? Ashley could have told you, if he could have talked. Ashley was the family mutt, an SPCA special, part beagle and part spaniel. For years, most of them after he died, he also served as the...
One Crazy 'Summer': Spike Lee's New Film Revisits the Son of Sam-Whether We Want to or Not
Once, there was another killer who haunted the night, struck out of nowhere and slipped away. Before John Wayne Gacy, the clown-suited slaughterer of teenage boys; before Wayne Williams, the strangler who stalked the poor black kids of Atlanta, there...
Open Season on Salinger, Several Lives to Live, Where Is Mom When You Need Her?, Singing in the Ring
Boxer Oscar de la Hoya has the face of a choirboy. Now we'll see if he has the voice of one, too. The welterweight champ has signed a multimillion-dollar record deal. Though he won't go into the studio until after his Sept. 18 fight in Las Vegas, de...
Perspectives
"Fat cats, skinny cats, we like all cats." Bush campaign spokesman David Beckwith, on publisher Steve Forbes's charge that the Texas governor was cozying up to "Washington fat cats" in exchange for their financial support "This could turn into...
Playing the Mating Game: When Will a Woman Go for the Hunk or the Hubby?
What do women want, anyway? If you interpret Freud's question as asking about women's taste in men, then the answer is... it depends on when you ask them. In the latest salvo in the scientific battle over how much of sexual behavior is shaped by genes...
Seeing through Stealth: Serb Gunners Brought Down One 'Invisible' Plane and Winged Another. Dumb Luck-Or Smart Shooting?
For the Serbs, it was a trophy of war. Late last March CNN cameras showed Serbian women dancing on the wing of an American warplane smoldering on the ground near Belgrade. After the initial shock, most Americans soon shrugged off the incident. The...
Still Secret: The KGB's Oswald File, Flying Blind, A Savvy Pol for a Justice Slot?, Everything Old Is New (and Pricey) Again, Jesus Saves, but the Pope Sells, Dead Heat, What's Up, Unionized Doc?, Whom Will We Bomb Next?, That Animal Attraction, Ted's Buffalo Need Room to Roam, Cross Talk
At the G7 summit in Cologne earlier this month, Russian President Boris Yeltsin slipped Bill Clinton a gift: eight newly declassified KGB documents about Lee Harvey Oswald's ties to the Soviet Union, including his October 1959 request for citizenship....
Take That! the Creme De la Crude
To find out how obscenities save the world from Satan and Saddam Hussein; to understand why the United States has declared war on Canada; to hear the best (and only) song written in praise of Brian Boitano, and to witness the violent demise of Bill...
The Battle for the Hotshots: Forget the Old Career Path. the Talent Is Going Dot.Com
Once they were citadels of prestige and wealth, and their employees were the anointed of American business, proud of their six-figure salaries and three-figure workweeks. Big consulting firms and investment banks used to have their pick of the best...
The Faces of a Fugitive: He May Be a Horror Story Come to Life, a Mysterious Loner Filled with Rage. the Feds Say This Man of Many Aliases Is a Serial Killer, So Dangerous That He's Earned a Place on the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List. the Hunt Is On
About 3 a.m. on June 2, U.S. Border Patrol officers stopped a small Hispanic man walking along the railroad tracks near El Paso, Texas. Discovering he had no ID, they concluded he was an illegal alien and took him to a federal lockup in Santa Theresa,...
The Fire This Time: A New Round of Balkan Revenge and Bloodletting Begins. but This Time the Targets Are Kosovo's Serbs
Ivanka and Bogic Milutinovic are living on borrowed time. The Serb couple, both in their 60s, live in Mitrovica, a town 20 miles north of Pristina. During the war, Mitrovica saw some of the worst ethnic cleansing of Albanians in Kosovo. The Milutinovics...
The Phantom Next Door: A Mysterious Insurance Scandal Leaves a Trail from the Rich Suburbs to the Caribbean to the Vatican
Talk about weirdo neighbors. Up in the "back country" of wealthy Greenwich, Conn., lived a man named Marty Frankel. There was nothing unusual about his compound of multi-million-dollar homes just off Lake Avenue, within cantering distance of Fortune...
The Sins of the Saints: Calista Flockhart Trades Ally McBeal's Everyday Angst for Neil LaBute's Scary, Pop Nihilism
The most controversial of the new filmmakers is Neil LaBute, whose two movies, "In the Company of Men" and "Your Friends and Neighbors," dealt with sexual brutality in yuppiedom. LaBute began as a playwright, and with the off-Broadway "Bash" he ups...
The 'Wild' Bunch: Will Smith and Barry Sonnenfeld Are Smash-Hit Friends
Barry Sonnenfeld and Will Smith are huddled watching the final 15 minutes of "Wild Wild West." Unnerved by early test screenings, Warner Brothers had turned skittish about its $100 million-plus Jules Verne voyage. But the movie works well now--Sonnenfeld...
THEY'RE RICH (AND YOU'RE NOT): The Economy's Booming. So Why Do So Many of Us Feel We're Missing out on the Party? More Than Ever, Achieving the American Dream Is a Game of Chance-And Picking the Right Stock
By most standards, Bill Frantz is doing great. At 31, he's an electrical engineer at General Motors, the biggest corporation in the country. In Detroit, a $60,000 salary goes pretty far. He has two cars, including a beloved Alfa Romeo, and he's going...
Vertiginous in New York: Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Parties May Decide Next Year's Most Watched Senate Race
Hillary Clinton is a leading cultural indicator, and New York politics, with enough variables to induce vertigo, illustrates the definition of politics as the organization of animosities. So consider the complexities surrounding her evident determination...
What Is SAMe: Proponents Claim That This Hot New Over-the-Counter Dietary Supplement Can Ease Depression, Restore Arthritic Joints and Combat Chronic Liver Disease. Here's What We Know about It-And What We Don't
She was making lunch for herself and a friend one Saturday this spring when an unfamiliar feeling swept over her. The 50-year-old social worker had fallen deep into depression two years earlier, and had given up on prescription antidepressants when...
What's the Color of Funny? 'The Boondocks' Riffs on Race-And Stirs Up Controversy
A pair of black kids from inner-city Chicago have just moved to the melanin-deprived suburbs, and they're experiencing serious culture shock. Huey, a scowling black nationalist, mistakes a neighbor hosing down his car for the legendary segregationist...