Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 134, No. 26, January 1

A Cure That May Cost Us Ourselves: SOCIETY: One of the Pioneers of Human Genetic Engineering Predicts That within 30 Years, There Will Be a Gene-Based Therapy for Most Diseases. but He Fears the Profound Dangers of His Own Work
A revolution is sweeping medicine--only the fourth one since Hippocrates argued, some 2,400 years ago, that the workings of the body can be explained by the laws of nature rather than the supernatural. The first revolution occurred soon after British...
Americans on Alert: As New Year's Approaches, There Are Troubling Signs of Possible Terrorist Plots Here and Abroad. the Bin Laden Threat-And What Else to Watch For
The car, a rented Chrysler 300, was the last in line to come off the boat from Victoria, British Columbia, at the ferry terminal in Port Angeles, Wash. When a U.S. Customs inspector started asking some routine questions, the driver appeared nervous....
... and Popcorn Will Cost $30, Movies: Nudity like You've Never Seen, and Moral 'Messages' in Action Films
Personally, my concerns for the future of cinema center on Clint Eastwood and Woody Allen: as the year 3000 approaches, will they still be casting themselves as romantic leads, pursuing actresses who won't be born until 2893? And what about the Oscars:...
A 'New Era' Rises in the East: SUPERPOWER: By Drawing on Its Unique Creative Resources, China Has a Chance to Be the Next Century's Dominant International Player
A century ago, China had its first bout of science-fiction fever. There seem to have been three main reasons for this. One was literary, the translation into Chinese of various Western utopian works, and of adventure stories such as Jules Verne's "Around...
Another Step Back: Old Videos and New Threats Rattle Columbine
This season should have been a time for healing and remembrance at Columbine High. The term was nearly over and Christmas was days away. The horrors of April 20, and all the sorrow since, might have been expected to recede a bit. The football team...
A Pig May Someday Save Your Life: Biotech: Scientists Are Racing to Turn Oinkers into Organ Donors. the Effort Could Bring Huge Benefits, but It Carries Huge Risks
At first it felt like a cold or a mild flu, nothing to stay in bed for. But 17-year-old Robert Pennington knew something more was wrong a few weeks later, when the whites of his eyes turned yellow. He visited a local clinic in Garland, Texas, where...
Bake-Off, 2049: The Winner! Food: All Ingredients Will Be Presweetened, and You'll Never Have to Actually Use Your Fancy, Status-Symbol Oven
Fifty years ago, in a ballroom temporarily outfitted with 100 kitchenettes at New York's Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, an ecstatic Theadora Smafield of Detroit won the first Pillsbury Bake-Off. The recipe that triumphed--No-Knead Water-Rising Twists--brought...
Battle Plan: Fighting: Waging the Next War - Instead of the Last One
Historians can tick off the revolutions in warfare: the invention of the stirrup (which allowed disciplined cavalry); the bow (the first long-range weapon); gunpowder; the airplane; the combination of the internal combustion engine and the radio (the...
Born to Be (Almost) Wild: Environment: As an Extinction Crisis Looms, Zoos Aren't Just Animal Jails; They're Leading the Fight for Survival
Think of the western world 1,500 years ago when a great civilization was collapsing, much of its accumulated knowledge on the point of disappearing forever. That's where we are now, biologists worry--at the start of a new Dark Age, marked by the loss...
Buffett Takes It All with Him: Wall Street: And Bill Gates Leaves It Behind, as Two 20th-Century Business Icons Stun 21st-Century Investors by Repealing Laws of Nature
By now, you've probably seen a zillion pieces about the leading business people, the biggest deals and the biggest business stories of the 20th century. But hey, writing about the great business stories of the 20th century isn't much of a challenge....
Caesar and Edison And. Saylor? Profile: The CEO of MicroStrategy Wants to Put a World of Instant Intelligence in Your Ear
Michael Saylor, the CEO of MicroStrategy, says his role models are Caesar, Churchill, Lincoln and Gandhi. He's not much interested, he says, in other businessmen, except maybe Henry Ford. Just as Caesar's mission was to "spread civilization," Saylor...
Conventional Wisdom
The CW wouldn't presume to play the arbitrary game of choosing the most important figures of the last 1,000 years. But here are some folks who will be remembered long after the computers crash and our headaches go away. Apologies to all who were left...
Everyone Will Want a Bilbao: Museums: Frank Gehry's Masterpiece Is about to Change the World's Cultural Landscape
You're going to be hearing a lot about the "Bilbao effect." No, it's not some puzzling new strain of virus, or a rare psychological condition first identified in the Basque country. What people are going to be talking about is that Frank Gehry's shiny,...
From the Prison of the 'Isms': IDEOLOGY: Communism and Nazism Are Gone. but Nationalism, Fundamentalism and Globalism Still Have to Sort Themselves Out
Mister Dooley, a fictional newspaper character at the last turn of the century, described a fanatic as someone who viewed himself as "doing what the Lord would do - if He only had the facts." The century that followed was beset by just such grandiose...
How the Future Looked in 1899: Predictions: What the Seers Got Wrong-And What They Got Right
Looking back on the events of the 20th century, the economist John Bates Clark could scarcely count his blessings. War and poverty had been eliminated, of course. Electricity and aerial navigation had transformed the daily grind into a cornucopia of...
I Beg Your#<AMP/>%$?* Pardon? Etiquette: A Promise from Miss Manners: The Future Won't Be as Rude as You Fear. (Which Means You Still Have to Write Thank-You Letters.)
Some 21st-century etiquette rules we can expect if current trends in social behavior continue to develop: Remember that you dress for other people's comfort as well as your own, so do not embarrass them by changing your sleeping clothes (if any) for...
If All the World's a Computer. Privacy: When Technology Hooks Us Up in One Enormous Network, Will We Have Any Secrets Left?
Any time, anywhere: that is the promise the captains of technology make us, even as we struggle with our existing machines, our cranky software and our creaky Internet. They mean it too. Imagine this: computers that enfold you, like a second skin....
It's Time to Turn the Last Page, Books: Forget Paper. Here Come E-Books-Digital Bits Injected into a Handheld Device with an Ultrasharp Display
No one is calling the 1900s the Century of the Book. But you could make a case for it. For most of those years, the heavy hitters in our culture landed their big punches between the covers of bound boards: Joyce, Freud, Proust, Salinger, Orwell......
'It's Tough to Be a Little Kid': The Legend Behind 'Peanuts' on His Strip's Life and Times
After announcing his retirement last week, Charles M. Schulz sat down with NEWSWEEK's Mark Miller at the cartoonist's Northern California home. Excerpts: How did you become interested in cartoons and comics? Always liked them. There was a dime store...
Learning to Love Obsolescence: Fond Farewells: Tomorrow's Garbage Is Everything We Love Today. Our Most Exciting New Technologies Are Merely Junk-in-the-Making
Obsolescence is the future in reverse. Everything we design, make, covet and buy moves in a natural arc from the drawing board to the garbage. Junk happens. Junk happens fastest in the areas of life where we are most intent, most engaged and most...
Markets Rule: BUSINESS: Next Stop, Wallstreetville-<BR>where Every Family Is a Publicly Traded Corporation and Misfortune Is Just a Buying Opportunity
Maybe it's too early for this perpetually rising stock market to join death and taxes among The Only Certain Things in Life. But at this rate, the day is likely to come soon, and when it does, the next logical step will seem obvious: the stock market...
Not Just a Game Anymore,Video: Highly Realistic, Interactive Games Will Replace Movies as Our Most Advanced Form of Entertainment
In the century to come, the medium producing the most dynamic, vital and exciting new art will be... videogames. Stop laughing. Instead, imagine it's 1899 and I've just said the exact same thing about... cinema. On the eve of 1900, people were already...
Now It's Time for Generation Next: The Future Will Be Grand Because Our Kids Will Be Its Keepers. Meet the Millennials, and Rejoice
History is most often written in terms of inventions and events, revolutions and revolutionary ideas. But it is always essentially the story of people. The New Deal. The new technology. Cubism. Communism. These are tales of individuals, of Roosevelt...
Our New Look: The Colors of Race: AMERICA & THE WORLD: With Intermarriage Rising and Racial Barriers Eroding, the United States Enters the Century More Tolerant Than Ever. but That 'Majority-Minority' Future We Keep Hearing about Will Never Arrive
The United States closed the 19th century declaring--in Plessy v. Ferguson--that rigid segregation was the natural order. It was a time when W.E.B. Du Bois despaired that America would ever get beyond its homespun apartheid. "The problem of the 20th...
Rewiring Your Gray Matter: The Brain: You Can Teach an Old Brain New Tricks. Neuroplasticity Promises to Give a Whole New Meaning to 'Changing Your Mind.'
Ladies and gentlemen, children of all ages!" booms the cartoonish little ringmaster on the computer screen. "Welcome to the Circus Sequence game!" Although it has all the earmarks of a typical educational CD, once Circus Sequence and the other six...
So Long, Snoopy <AMP/> Co. for 50 Years, 'Peanuts' Has Tickled America's Funny Bone. but More Than That, Charles Schulz's Characters Mirrored Our Lives and Taught Us Timeless Lessons about Faith, Hope and Love. You Were a Good Man, Charlie Brown
It was, all in all, a typical few days for the "Peanuts" gang. Linus, having built a lopsided snowman, quietly instructs his creation, "Don't slump..." Sally has trouble sending her teacher a Christmas card because she doesn't know her name; when Charlie...
Space: Oh, the Places We'll Go!
Despite the recent loss of two Mars probes, NASA has a full slate of missions proposed to explore virtually every corner of our solar system in the coming century. Over the next 15 years, efforts will focus on understanding how the solar system and...
The War Hero Takes Fire: Why POW/MIA Extremists Are Targeting McCain
John McCain was about to get ambushed. In June 1996 an angry group marched into the Arizona senator's Capitol Hill office and demanded to see him. While they waited, the visitors--activists calling for government action on U.S. soldiers still missing...
The War on Disease Goes Miniature: Nanomedicine: Drugs and Cancer Tests, Cell by Cell
The future of medicine is vast--and it's also amazingly small. One day in the next century, thanks to the burgeoning field of nanotechnology, you could walk out of the doctor's office with a prescription for cancer detectors so tiny you can't see them....
Up, Up, and Away, Dude! Extreme Sports: What in the World Is Freestyle Motocross? Here's a Better Question: How Big Is It Going to Get?
The future of extreme sports began six months ago along the shore of San Francisco Bay. Tuesday afternoon, June 22, to be exact: day four of the fifth annual X Games. A mob of ultrahip teens and twentysomethings, more than a quarter-million strong,...
Was It Virtually Good for You? Sex: The Best Lovemaking of Your Life Is Just a Few Nanobots and a Bodysuit Away
In the next century you're going to have better sex than you've ever had before. You won't have a single sexual fantasy that will go unfulfilled. If it's as obvious as uncorseting a virtual Gwyneth Paltrow as she murmurs sweet British nothings in your...
When Cars Drive You: AUTOMOBILES: Joysticks to Steer with and Night-Vision Windshields Are Only the Beginning. You'll Never Complain about the Carpool Again
It's 2050, and one quintessential American passion has withstood the test of time: we like to drive. So you decide to hit the open road and cruise across country. First you must unplug your car from your house. That's right: cars now run on electric...
Will We Ever Get over Irony? ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT: We've Had Everything Else, So Why Not a Backlash against Irony? Could Be Fun. but If It Survived the End of 'Seinfeld,' Our Disapproval Won't Make It Go Away. in Fact, Irony Kind of Gets off on Our Disapproval
So when did it hit you that the 20th century might be maxed out on irony? Just this fall, when Fox TV put on a quiz show called "Greed"? This past spring, when Kurt Andersen's novel, "Turn of the Century," presented characters whose deviousness takes...
Words from the Heart: After Clinton, Voters Seem Ready for Renewal, but Do They Want Their Leader to Wear Religion on His Sleeve?
George W. Bush hadn't expected the question, and said later that he may have misinterpreted it. Nevertheless, the governor of Texas made news with his answer at NBC's recent GOP debate in Iowa. He and his five rivals were asked to name the "political...
You Sure Don't Fit the Profile: Politics: After More Than Two Centuries, the Senate and the Presidency Will Stop Being the Preserve of the Male and the Pale
In Louisiana, where Donna Brazile was born in 1959, race did not just matter, it mattered more than anything else. As a black child--the third of Lionel and Jean Brazile's eight children--she learned that everyday life was about drawing lines. Segregation...