Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from July 17

A Battle of Wills: A Half Century of Conflict Comes Down to a Summit at Which Arafat, Barak and Clinton Could Solve It All-Or Fuel More Hatred
Camp David seems a long way from Armageddon, the Biblical final battlefield said to sit on some of the very land that Israelis and Palestinians have fought over for 50 years. Leafy green, quiet and remote--even mobile phones don't work well there--Camp...
A Bush Mystery in Alabama: The Three Missing Months of W's National Guard Service
As he barnstormed through Alabama in late June, Texas Gov. George W. Bush wanted the press to pick up on his issue du jour, soaring gasoline prices. But in Tuscaloosa he was blindsided by reporters asking picky questions about a little-known chapter...
Aha! Caught You Reading: Jacques Barzun and the Goblet of Fire, and Other Unsurprising Surprise Best Sellers
The next time someone talks about the narrow interests of kids today, how they attend only to the raucous cry of the computer calling across a stretch of cable to its mate, the Internet, remember this week. Remember how the boys and girls of America...
An Embarrassing Star Wars Flop
Last week's $100 million missile-defense test was supposed to prove that a Star Wars system to shoot down incoming nuclear warheads isn't just science fiction. Instead, it was an embarrassing failure for the Pentagon. The prototype system's radar-guided...
Breaking the Silence: AIDS Experts Are Convening in South Africa, One of the Nations Suffering Most from the Plague. Task One: Get Kids to Wise Up to What's Killing Them. the Story of a Crisis within a Crisis
Like teenagers everywhere, the girls of Khayelitsha Site B understand that breaking up with a boyfriend can be painful. But in this dirt-poor squatter camp on the outskirts of Cape Town, teen love gone sour carries special risks. A jilted boy--or one...
Changing My Name after 60 Years: As 'Tom Ross,' I Denied My Family's Jewish Heritage. as Tom Rosenberg, I'm Learning to Embrace It
My parents left Nazi Germany in 1938, when I was 6 and my mother was pregnant with my sister. They arrived in America with a lot of baggage--guilt over deserting loved ones, anger over losing their home and business, and a lifelong fear of anti-Semitism....
Dodging the Yogic Fliers: Buchanan Faces a Curious Transcendental Challenge
Pat Buchanan is outraged that he'll be barred from the debate between Al Gore and George W. Bush if he wins the Reform Party nomination. "If we are excluded," he said recently, "then the American democracy is, in some sense, a fraud." There is, however,...
Generation Y's First Vote: Affluent, Eager to Serve but Turned off by Politics, Young Voters Are a Tantalizing Prize. How the Pols Are Trying to Court Them
Bill Clinton and Tawan Davis should be soulmates, leaders in youth politics 33 years and a generation apart. In 1967, when baby boomers were coming of age, Clinton was in the political vanguard. As a junior at Georgetown, he ran for student-government...
Give It to Us Straight: Here's How to Win over Cynical Young Voters: Tell Us the Truth. We Can Take It
Okay. I'll admit it. I have an interest in this election. There are my family ties, of course. But I'm also a member of Generation X, a much-discussed chunk of the electorate. I've heard my peers written off by the pundits as a generation too involved...
Hip-Hop Spot
What do hip-hop fans want? Def Jam founder Russell Simmons and ex-Source editor Selwyn Seyfu Hinds think they know. They recently launched 360hiphop.com, which overloads the senses with multi-media: clips from a Snoop Dogg video shoot, 360-degree photos...
Hollywood Goes Wall Street: A Flood of Movies and Upcoming Television Shows Explore the Nation's Obsession with Making Money
There is a pivotal scene in the latest Tom Cruise flick, "M:I-2," where the chief villain, Sean Ambrose, is setting out his demands to another bad guy (a corporate CEO). Since Ambrose holds the fate of the world in his hands, the sky is pretty much...
'I Can See the Finish Line': Marla Runyan May Leap from ParaOlympian to 'Ordinary' Olympian-But She's Far from Ordinary
If Marla Runyan had her wish, this story would be a straightforward account of her track-and-field odyssey. How she struggled with the heptathlon, the women's seven-event version of the decathlon, before switching to distance running. How she almost...
Not on the Reading List: Thanks to Internet Access, Librarians Have a New Job: Keeping Their Patrons from Tuning in to Porn
Librarian Wendy Adamson likes to keep up with readers' interests. She knows who likes a good mystery novel and who prefers the latest romance yarn. But she draws the line at helping patrons indulge their sexual curiosity on the Internet. "One guy was...
On the Trail of the Hard Truth: As Investigators Scour the Kosovo Countryside for Evidence of Last Year's Slaughter, They're Finding That Doing Justice Is a Hard Slog. A NEWSWEEK Exclusive
The four skulls lie in a clearing in the forest, just off the main road through the village of Meja. A Kosovar shepherd spotted them three months ago, and they have remained there, untouched, until the arrival of the United Nations homicide squad on...
Perspectives
"If the parties do not seize this moment, if they cannot make progress now, there will be more hostility and more bitterness, perhaps even more violence." President Bill Clinton, calling for this week's Mideast peace summit at Camp David "Success...
Revisiting the Mommy Track: Prosperity and Higher Pay for Their Jobs Are Leaving Women Free Not to Work
Average wages are rising. Employers are beating the bushes for hires. There's more flexibility and equality in the workplace. As you might expect, these attractions are changing women's approach to work. But are they piling into the welcoming job market?...
Rich V. Rhode Island
This "survivor's" home life is hardly a day at the beach. Richard Hatch, the gay corporate consultant on CBS's adventure in evolution, returned from Pulau Tiga in April--with or without the prize money, he's not saying. But two days later he was arrested...
Soda Pop to Vox Populi: A Coca-Cola Man Beats the PRI. What's Ahead
To dethrone the world's longest-ruling political party, Vicente Fox Quesada marketed himself to Mexican voters with the same panache he once used to sell them the world's No. 1 soft drink. But hours after the former Coca-Cola executive was elected...
Stop the Insanity: Parents in Minnesota Are Starting a Small Rebellion against the Tyranny of Overscheduled Kids. Will Their Revolt Spread?
Take a deep breath and spend a week with the Lee family in Minneapolis. The three oldest kids--Anna, 12, Nathan, 9, and Kristian, 7--play one sport or another practically all year round. (Baby Ilsa is only 1i so she gets a break here.) Anna's the complete...
The Cool School: Decades Later, a Group of College Friends Are Making Cars Sexy Again. Why They Rule the Road
Superstar car designer J Mays recently made a triumphant return to his alma mater, the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. The man behind the retro reinvention of the New Beetle and Ford Thunderbird came back to give a new generation of...
The Hedgies' Tide Rolls Out: Some Hedge-Fund Managers Are on the Beach Because They're So Far under Their High-Water Mark They Need a Submarine
It's summer, that glorious season when many of us get warm fuzzies about beaches and water. But in parts of Wall Street this year--especially among the hedge-fund crowd--"beach" and "water" have a double meaning. That's because some of the world's...
The View from the Top: The Stakes Couldn't Be Higher, for If We Fail, There Will Be More Bloodshed and Tears
This week, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Palestinian Chairman Yasir Arafat will come to Camp David at my invitation to seek agreement on the core issues that have fueled a half century of conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. In coming...
The X-Men Cometh: A Studio Aims to Please the Fanatics-And the Rest of Us
Cyberfan Devil0509 is so angry he could scream. The source of his ire: a nanosecond snippet from a preview for this Friday's "X-Men" movie. In it, a good-guy mutant named Wolverine (Hugh Jackman) is holding a man at bay with some nasty-looking claws....
Venus Rising: At Wimbledon, the Older Williams Sister Captures Her First Grand Slam
Venus Williams likes to think of herself as the calm sister, the cerebral one, the serious kid in a family famous for its outrageousness. After she and Serena won their semifinals doubles match at Wimbledon last week, Venus actually began discussing...
We Can Play a Big Part: Find a Cause or a Candidate You Feel Passionately about and Figure out a Way to Help
I can't remember a time when public service didn't play a part in my life. My first childhood memory was of my grandfather George H. W. Bush announcing his run for the presidency in 1979. My parents and grandparents wanted me to grow up with a desire...
Why Harry's Hot: With the Sweep of a Wand, 'Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,' the Fourth Book in J.K. Rowling's Magical Series, Is the Fastest-Selling Title - of Any Kind - in History. Behind the Frenzy and the More Enduring Question of What Makes a Classic
J. K. Rowling swears she never saw it coming. In her wildest dreams, she didn't think her Harry Potter books would appeal to more than a handful of readers. "I never expected a lot of people to like them," she insisted in a recent interview with NEWSWEEK....