Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from November 6

A Cry from the Deep: A Letter Retrieved from the Sunken Russian Submarine Kursk Shows That a Few Crewmen Lived for Hours, at Least, after the Disaster. Could They Have Been Saved?
The letter came from a steel tomb on the floor of the Barents Sea. "All personnel from compartments six, seven and eight moved to the ninth," wrote a round-faced, 27-year-old naval officer, Lt. Capt. Dmitry Kolesnikov. Nearly two hours had passed since...
A Family Dilemma: To Scout or Not to Scout? America's Most Wholesome Group Makes My Sister Feel She Has to Choose between Her Gay Brother and Her Son
My sister constantly tells me how much her 6-year-old son Ricky (not his real name) adores me. So when he came home with a flier about joining a fun and exciting group for kids his age, she had a tough decision to make. Should she let him join a group...
An All-American Voice: Fans of Classic Soul and Gospel Will Love Rapper Mystikal's New CD-If They Can Get Past That Certain Song
Even when the beats hit the hardest, rap music really comes down to the voice: not just the boasts, yarns, protests and exhortations, but the tone, timbre, rhythm, pitch, articulation and attitude. And among all rap's distinctive voices--from Chuck...
... and Weighing War: Gore in the Cross-Fire: Why the Young Senator Bucked His Party and Voted to Back the Gulf War
It was nearing midnight on Jan. 11, 1991, and Al Gore was still in his Senate office, grappling with the vote of his life. In a few hours he would have to decide whether to support President George Bush in a war against Saddam Hussein. Analysts warned...
An Earlier ATT Spinoff Sputters: Once a High Flier, Lucent Hits a Downdraft
Lucent technologies burst onto the scene in 1996 and quickly became Wall Street's golden child. The telecommunications-equipment maker was the supplier of choice for one of the fastest-growing sectors of the economy. A year later, the company tapped...
An Old Machine's New Job: Their Father Did It for JFK, and Now the Daleys of Chicago Must Find the Critical Votes to Deliver Illinois to Gore
Tucked between the south end thrift store and a faded law firm, the office of Chicago's 8th Ward Regular Democratic Organization is covered with dozens of help wanted postings advertising slots on public payrolls from the Chicago Housing Authority...
Arming Yourself to Fight the Flu: Researchers Have Identified an Array of Herbs and Supplements That May Help Boost Your Immunity
It's not the sound of rustling leaves that tells me fall is here. It's the chorus of coughing and sneezing in my waiting room. As kids return to school and we all start shutting our windows, cold and flu viruses have a heyday that can last until spring....
AT&T's Magic Act: The Telecom Giant Says Its Latest Restructuring Will Reward Shareholders and Unleash Its Businesses. but Critics Call It Mere Financial Trickery Designed to Please Wall Street. Who Gains? the Bankers Doing the Deal, for One
One of the side effects of the stock market's being so venerated these days is that a company's stock price becomes the tail that wags the dog. You can do a wretched job of running your company, but if Wall Street bids up the stock, Main Street buzz...
A Voter's Panic Guide: Decision Time: The Political Noise Stops Next Week When You Step into the Voting Booth. the Candidates May Leave You Cold, but They Have Given You a Big Choice on Where We All Go from Here. A Few Reminder Clips on Some of the Hot Issues:
Prescription Drugs Bush and Gore both have plans to help the estimated 13 million seniors who lack prescription-drug coverage--and the candidates offer voters a real choice of approaches. The Gore plan, costing $253 billion through 2010, adds a prescription-drug...
Basketball's Bad Boy: NBA Superstar Allen Iverson Has Always Mouthed off. but His Incendiary New Rap Album Has Folks Watching His Every Move-And Word
It's 1:30 a.m. in a small recording studio in a seedy South Philly neighborhood where NBA superstar Allen Iverson and his boys are laying down tracks for his debut album, "Non Fiction." After 30-minutes of nonstop rap, Iverson, dressed in oversize...
Brief Case
MIGRAINES Beautiful Pain Relief Here's a painless way to look good. Many dermatologists have found that the Botox they use to erase wrinkles also prevents migraines. Botox is a purified derivative of the same toxin that causes botulism, and it's been...
But Can You Sniff the Twist Cap? Wal-Mart and an Upscale Vineyard Devise New Ways to Get into Wine
So you think you know wine? Let's see if you can tell apart these two wines, which both went on sale in October. One is a $135 bottle of 1997 Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon, an ultralimited bottling of just 120 cases from PlumpJack Winery, part of a luxury...
Calling All the Arquettes: As Strike Fears Increase, Movies Rush into Production
With their half-year-long strike against commercial producers tentatively settled, union actors everywhere can finally start appearing in beer and auto advertisements again. They better save every last nickel, though, because in another seven months,...
Crass Course: An Empty 'Full Monty'
The people who have turned the hit movie "The Full Monty" into a Broadway musical took the stripping concept very seriously. They've not only removed the cast's clothes (though the fleeting frontal shot is no "Oh, Calcutta!"). They stripped away the...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY A Not-So-Top-Secret Area 51 You've seen it from above. Now take the virtual walking tour of Area 51, thanks to 3dvillage.com, a Cary, N.C., software company that has reverse-engineered a ground-level view of the site from Russian satellite...
Fairway Zen: Life Lessons on the Links
Rannulph Junuh (Matt Damon) has lost his swing. A golden boy of golf with infinite promise, he left Savannah, Ga., to enlist in World War I, and returned, years later, a broken man. Now it's 1931, in the depths of the Great Depression. Junuh's long-abandoned...
Falling Timberwolves: For Signing an Illegal Contract, Minnesota's NBA Team Gets Hammered with a $3.5 Million Fine
Last week, after Yankee pitcher Roger Clemens hurled the splintered remains of a broken bat (rather than his lethal weapon of choice, the ball) toward Mets star Mike Piazza, Major League Baseball fined him $50,000. It was, by baseball standards, a...
Hello, Angels: The Making of the New, High-Wattage 'Charlie's Angels' Showcased as Much Intrigue, Plotting and Mane-Tossing as an Average Episode of the Classic '70S TV Show. but Beauty Always Has a Price
Last week's Hollywood premiere of "Charlie's Angels" at Mann's Chinese Theatre attracted everybody from George Clooney to original TV Angel Jaclyn Smith. Columbia Pictures was forced to book an additional theater for the overflow crowd. But as soon...
Hey, Mister DJ! U.K.'S Fatboy Slim Spins Again
Whether or not you know it, you've probably hummed, or at least heard, a Fatboy Slim tune over the past two years. The British DJ's last album, 1998's "You've Come a Long Way, Baby," wasn't a radio blockbuster, but crept through the back door of America's...
Horror Show: The Blair Witch Is Back, and the News Isn't Good
All the best stuff in "Book of Shadows: Blair Witch 2" happens before the credits--and the credits aren't at the end. This sequel is set after the release of the original "Blair Witch Project," and in the faux-documentary spirit of the original the...
Inching Ever Closer to War: Positions Harden-And the Blood Continues to Flow
Nabil Arair planned his martyrdom carefully. Before dawn last Thursday, the 24-year-old primary-school administrator attended his usual prayers at a mosque near his home in Gaza City. "He acted in a very normal way," his father, Faraj, recalls. Several...
In the Voters' Pocketbooks: We're Better off Now Than We Were Eight Years Ago. but for Al, Is It Better Enough?
It's thought that elections turn on the economy. Your personal vote might hinge on abortion, guns or Medicare. President Clinton could be a factor, pro or con. But collectively, our choice generally reflects how well we think we're doing. For this...
Just Getting to Know You: Weirdly Reclusive Leader of a Stalinist Holdout or Practical-Minded Statesman: Will the Real Kim Jong Il Please Stand Up?
A little dialogue can make a lot of difference. By giving the outside world a peek into his secluded country, North Korean leader Kim Jong Il has transformed his image, in just a few months, from that of an ominous rogue tyrant in Asia to something...
Learning Compromise. Bush at the Helm: How He Managed to Spin Legislative Setbacks into Political Wins
When the Texas Legislature convened in Austin in the winter of 1997, George W. Bush was riding high--or so he thought. The economy was hot, the treasury bulging. His poll numbers were strong and The Great Mentioner already was calling him the front...
Mail Call
Yeas and Nays for Albright Readers responded to our Oct. 16 cover story on Yugoslavia with strong opinions and emotions about the politics of the region. "Thanks for the most exciting cover of the year--finally freedom for the long-suffering Yugoslavian...
Newsmakers
Real October Surprises Now that the Yankees have won the World Series, it would be easy to think we knew they would all along--with their previous 25 championships and all. Much about the series was predictable: the usual stars (Derek Jeter, Mike Piazza)...
No More Empty Cubicles: Tech Firms Were Once Desperate for Employees. with Dot-Coms Tanking, the Tables Are Turning
Chris Larsen thought he had a hiring headache on his hands. When his chief information officer gave notice in September, the CEO of the Dublin, Calif.-based E-Loan figured it would take three months to hook a competent replacement in the tech industry's...
Not the Retiring Kind: GE's Welch Postpones His Tee Time to Do One Last Deal
When Harvard business School instructs students on how a company should choose a new CEO, professors use a favorite case study: General Electric's famous face-off in the late '70s. Back then, GE chairman Reg Jones put a half-dozen underlings through...
Peace on the Ground: Bush, Bosnia-And the Role of U.S. Troops
When a convoy of U.S. diplomats drove through Srebrenica last week, nobody along the road cheered the peacemakers. One man held up a three-fingered Serb victory sign. Another grabbed his crotch and gave it a vulgar tug. United Nations Ambassador Richard...
Periscope
MICROSOFT Hackers: Getting to the Source Last week's news that hackers got access to Microsoft's internal corporate network isn't just an embarrassment for the software giant. The attack may have jeopardized software that's used on 90 percent of personal...
Perspectives
"Only Al Gore can beat Al Gore. And he's been doing a pretty good job of that."Ralph Nader, responding to critics who insist he could cost Gore this very close race "Whether you like us or not, we're winners." Yankee right fielder Paul O'Neill,...
Preserving a Bug's Life: An Artist Sees the Lowly African Termite as High Art
Sculptor Steve Tobin didn't set out for Ghana with termites in mind. But while he was visiting a friend there three years ago, the termites' tall, sturdy dwellings mesmerized him. Tobin couldn't bring the mounds back home, so he decided to make massive...
Ray's Back in the Groove: Now It Can Be Told: How a Legendary Software Designer Came Up with a Way for People to Work Together Using the Net in a Groundbreaking Way
What's Ray Ozzie doing? That's been the question high-tech rubberneckers have been asking for three years now, ever since the 44-year-old software cult hero set up shop at a former shoe factory in Beverly, Mass., and refused to tell anybody what the...
Silicon Valley's Latest Craze: Schadenfreude: The German Concept of Rejoicing in the Misfortunes of Others Is Thriving in the Ruins of the New Economy
When Jason Ward returned to northern California in 1997 after college, he hated how his home-town of Portola Valley had changed. The redwood foot-hills of his childhood had become a playground for the dot-com set. Patrons at his favorite biker bar...
The Best of the Supremes: With the Presidential Election, the Voters Face a Referendum on the Future of the High Court
Ruth Bader Ginsburg has not shared her cookie recipe with the readers of Good Housekeeping. Anthony Kennedy has yet to appear on the cover of People magazine. David Souter has not gone late night to trade laughs with Letterman. Maybe that is why,...
The Economics of Karate: As the Number of Home-Schooled Kids Soars, Districts Are Trying Novel Ways to Lure Them Back to the Fold
Largely for "spiritual reasons," Nancy Manos started home-schooling her children five years ago and has studiously avoided public schools ever since. Yet last week, she was enthusiastically enrolling her 8-year-old daughter, Olivia, in sign language...
The New Victims of Hate: Bias Crimes Hit America's Fastest-Growing Ethnic Group
John Lee can barely remember the most terrifying night of his life. One moment he was meeting friends on the steps of his dorm at the State University of New York at Binghamton, the next he lay hospitalized with a fractured skull. In February, Lee...
The Search for Clues: Did Officials Miss Hints of an Impending Attack?
Two weeks before a pair of suicide bombers hit the USS Cole, a popular satellite TV channel in Qatar broadcast an ominous message from Osama bin Laden. With the camera rolling, bin Laden's top lieutenant, Ayman al-Zawahiri, warned darkly that it was...
The Stereotype Trap: From 'White Men Can't Jump' to 'Girls Can't Do Math,' Negative Images That Are Pervasive in the Culture Can Make Us Choke during Tests of Ability
The students had no idea of the real purpose of the study they had volunteered for--it is, after all, standard operating procedure in psychology to keep subjects in the dark on that little point. (If volunteers know they're being studied for, say,...
Where Ralph Went Wrong: Nader Is Hurting Not Just Al Gore, but All the Causes He Has Championed over the Years
When I was 10 years old, growing up in Chicago, I heard the demonstrators in town for the 1968 Democratic Convention chanting, "Dump the Hump." That fall, they and millions of other supporters of Eugene McCarthy believed there was "no difference" between...
Who'll Care for Dad? Millions of Boomers Are Facing the Wrenching Dilemma of Where to Move an Ailing Parent. Careful Planning Will Make the Transition Easier on Everyone
Mary Yena figured she would always be there for her father. When Alzheimer's disease robbed him of the ability to care for himself, she arranged full-time home care and put in long days herself, driving him to church each morning, dashing home to get...
Who'll Have the Last Laugh? the Race Was Hotly Contested from the Beginning, Brutally Fought in the End and Never Really Inspiring. the Mad Dash to the Finish-And How Nader Could Tip the Balance
The high road in Pennsylvania--such as it is--runs from Forbes Avenue in Pittsburgh to Chestnut Street in Philadelphia. The state always has been disputed territory in war and politics, but never more than it is now, in the final, cliffhanging days...
Why Cookies Look Grreat: Cereal Is Slumping, but Keebler's Snacks Are Cooking
When cereal giant Kellogg paid nearly $4 billion last week to acquire cookie maker Keebler, it had noshers like Karen Ohlrich in mind. On her regular Thursday-night grocery-shopping trip, the 38-year-old Internet executive has no time for the cereal...
Yippee for 'Yi Yi': A Rich, Humane Portrait of a Taipei Family's Struggles
Unless you are lucky enough to frequent film festivals around the world, the name Edward Yang will mean nothing to you. This Taiwanese writer-director is a world-class talent, yet until now none of his remarkable films have been commercially distributed...