Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from March 19

At Last, the Battle Is Joined: It Could Be a Decisive Moment for Campaign-Finance Reform-If the Press Pays Attention
Just another Washington power play: Republican critics of pending "ergonomic" workplace regulations didn't believe the claims of labor unions that repetitive-stress injuries--mostly to the arms and lower back--cost $9 billion a year in lost wages and...
Cool So Is Thriller This: Christopher Nolan's Backward Noir, 'Memento'
You are a young, independent-movie director, and Oscar nominee Steven Soderbergh has just left a screening of your new film absolutely convinced that the independent-movie scene is dead. Surely this is not a good thing. But wait. Slow down. Soderbergh...
Cradle to Grave TV: THE STRATEGY: Hook 'Em While They're Young: How the World's Biggest Television Companies Are Planning to Keep You a Viewer for Life
Months ago, WB network CEO Jamie Kellner greenlit "The Oblongs," one of the more bizarre projects ever slated for prime-time television. The upcoming cartoon series on the AOL Time Warner-owned WB is a wicked satire showcasing a family of misfits living...
Critical Moment
MOVIES The Dish A comic charmer about small-town Aussies thrust center stage when their satellite dish captured the '69 moon landing. Sweet. D.A. 3 Stars 15 Minutes Celebrity-cop Robert De Niro hunts down media-mad killers in this lurid thriller....
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY Solving a Nightclub Mystery Everything that videogame developer SquareSoft touches these days seems to turn to gold. But, with its eagerly anticipated first game for the PlayStation 2, The Bouncer ($50; 800-245-4525), Square may...
Doing the Bare Minimum: Media: Magazines Are Rethinking the Internet. Last Year: 'Destination' Sites. This Year: 'Companion' Sites
The web site of the New Yorker magazine, scheduled to launch on a Monday morning a few weeks ago, went up several hours late. But what's a few hours when you're operating on Conde Nast time? The New Yorker's parent company has been slow in creating...
Family Notes
EDUCATION: Tough Times For Slackers School is getting harder, according to Reality Check 2001, an annual national survey conducted by Public Agenda and Education Week. The number of teachers who say their schools passed students based on age rather...
From an Unlikely Perch, 'SLOTUS' Takes Control: Lynne Cheney Is as Hot as Her Husband Is Cool
Lynne Cheney is small, blond and, when necessary, fierce. Her forceful personality was on display last week at the hospital as she quizzed doctors and protected her husband's privacy. "She was a commanding, impenetrable presence," says Mary Matalin,...
From Broadway to Boob Tube: The Great White Way Is TV-Bound
So Emma Thompson shaved her head for a measly TV movie. Big deal. "I thought the whole shaved-head thing was old news since Sinead and Sigourney," says Thompson. Anyway, Thompson had other things to worry about when she agreed to star in HBO's "Wit."...
Heart of the Matter: Vital Signs: He's a Private Man Loath to Read about His Health in the Papers. but His Weak Heart Has Forced the Issue to the Fore. Is Dick Cheney Strong Enough for Bush-And the Country-To Lean On?
At 13, Dick Cheney was a new kid in town. His family had moved from Nebraska to Casper, Wyo. He spent that summer of 1954 in the public library, reading history, acquiring a yen for solitary pursuits: fly-fishing in swift-flowing waters and, in time,...
Hounded by A Dog Attack: The Owners of a Killer Canine May Face Charges
It was hardly your typical attorney-client relationship. Nearly every day San Francisco lawyers Robert Noel and Marjorie Knoller wrote doting letters to inmates Paul Schneider and Dale Bretches about the two dogs they were caring for on their behalf--the...
'I Can Make Peace': In an Exclusive Interview, Ariel Sharon Vows Not to Retake Palestinian Territory
It wasn't long ago that Ariel (Arik) Sharon was regarded as a has-been, an aging hawk who seemed ill-suited to Israel's modern era of peace and prosperity. Then Israeli-Palestinian tensions erupted in violence, and Israelis flocked overwhelmingly to...
Is It Sexual Exploitation If Victims Are 'Virtual'? the Supremes Must Decide If the Risk of Child Abuse Outweighs Free Speech
In 1982, when the Supreme Court first upheld a state law banning child pornography, nobody was thinking about the possibility of making child porn without a kid. But since then wonders of modern technology have brought us virtual child porn: images...
Is This the End of Inflation? Turkey's Currency Crisis May Be the Last Battle in the Global War against Hyperinflation
Losing your cool can be very costly in today's capitalist world. When Turkey's (normally calm) prime minister, Bulent Ecevit, walked out of a stormy meeting with his president and vented to reporters that he had been slandered, financial markets panicked....
It's Not Just How We Play That Matters: The New Trend? Games and Contests Where No Child Loses. but Kids Need to Learn the Lessons of Defeat
Last Halloween my 5-year-old son entered a pumpkin-decorating contest at his school. He was so proud of his entry--a wild combination of carvings, paint and feathers he had constructed all by himself with his own kindergartner's sense of art. He lugged...
JAMES MADISON REMEMBERED: Madisonian Doctrine Today Has Its Opposite-Call It McCainism, an Antipluralist Populism
There is no monument to James Madison in Washington. There is a tall, austere monument to the tall (6"2"), austere man for whom the city is named, a man of Roman virtues and eloquent reticence. There is a Greek-revival memorial to Madison's boon companion,...
New College Savings Plans: A 529 Plan Offers Tax Breaks on Savings, but Parents Wonder If They'll Lose Financial Aid
What's the best way to save for college? Take a look at the new tax-deferred 529 investment plans. In many ways, they're a slam-dunk. But whenever I mention them, many of you object. You're dreaming about the amount of college aid you hope to get and...
Newsmakers
America's Most Wanted He pissed off Dennis Quaid. he called the director of his recent bomb "Proof of Life" a "f---ing idiot." And at this point Meg Ryan looks a lot like a woman scorned. So there is no shortage of suspects in the FBI investigation...
Out of Africa: During a Civil War, Thousands of Sudanese Boys Fled through the Bush, Facing Death at Every Turn. Now the Survivors Are Moving Here. This Is Their Story
An hour into his round-the-clock journey from Nairobi, Kenya, to Grand Rapids, Mich., Aciek Ateng Nai got a first taste of his life to come. High over Sudan, a flight attendant set down a plastic tray in front of him. It was typical airline fare: a...
Party on, Little Dudes: Birthday Celebrations Have Become So Elaborate That Some Parents Think They Need to Take out a Second Mortgage to Pay for Them. Here's How to Keep It Sane
To celebrate their son Barrett's 4th birthday, Vicki and Paul Medvec of Highland Park, Ill., threw a dinosaur-theme bash. An "excavation site" in the garage was brimful of dog bones. A 60-foot stegosaurus dominated the driveway. A born hostess who...
Periscope
THE BUDGET Still a Lot of Pork on the Menu George W. Bush, like every president, promises to be a porkbuster. His cherished tax cut won't work without slicing fat from congressional spending. What to cut? Bush vows to trim 40 percent this year...
Perspectives
"One House down, and now the Senate to go."President George W. Bush, on the House's passing his massive tax-cut plan "My assessment after a few weeks of this Congress is that bipartisanship is over." House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt, lamenting...
Seeing Is Believing: From Tokyo to Chicago, German Photographer Andreas Gursky Looks at the World through a Crystal-Clear Lens. His Large-Scale Color Prints Are at Once Hypnotic but Highly Precise and Have the Art World Champing at the Bit for More
He's got that Pierce Brosnan pursed lip, and the same knowing twinkle in his eyes; you almost expect him to introduce himself as "Gursky--Andreas Gursky." Indeed, the trim, 45-year-old German photographer, whose midcareer retrospective recently opened...
Surviving the Shakeout: Retail: Catering to the Customer Is Back in Style at the Big Retail Outlets. New Technologies Promise to Make Shopping Less of a Drag
In a booming economy, when the job market is tight, customer service tends to take a dive. Nowhere is that truer than at retailing establishments. But in lean times like these, catering to the customer is back in style. That means giving people what...
The Design Dilemma: Usability: Leading Expert Jakob Nielsen on the Ways Web Sites Too Often Antagonize Their Users
Jakob Nielsen probably doesn't like your Web site one bit. It wouldn't be surprising: Nielsen doesn't like most sites. For years the former Sun engineer has been crusading against bad Web design, using his biweekly "Alertbox" column at useit.com to...
The Downside of Momentum: THE MARKETS: Nasdaq's Sickening Fall Shows How Forces That Help Youon the Way Up Can Bite You in the Backside on the Way Down
It's getting hard to tell business news from the obituaries these days. What with the likes of eToys and Communities.com and Cybercash croaking. With Yahoo and Amazon.com (and even Intel) being treated as if their survival is in doubt. With mighty...
The Valley Gets Deeper: THE COMPANIES: It Was a Bad Week for Yahoo, Intel and Cisco. Hopes of a Quick Rebound Are Fading Fast
The gossip gladiators were on-line in force last Wednesday, after the Nasdaq market halted trading in Internet media heavyweight Yahoo, pending a company announcement later that day. Everyone from traders to dot-com rubberneckers wanted to guess what...
The Web's Dark Secret: Before the Internet Came along, Pedophiles Were Lonely and Hunted Individuals. Authorities Had Child Pornography under Control. Today Networks of Child Abusers Are Proliferating Worldwide. A NEWSWEEK Investigation
Father Fortunato Di Noto counts himself as having once been among the innocent, or at least the blissfully ignorant. He is everything you might expect an Italian priest to be: portly, balding, popular among the local kids, prone to passionate bursts...
Using Students as Metal Detectors: Tattling May Be the Only Way to Stop the Next Santee
Neil O'Grady laughed when he heard about it. "Andy talked for a while about getting a gun and bringing it to school to shoot people," said the Santana High School 15-year-old of his close friend, Charles Andrew Williams. "He even told me to stay home...
What Is a Pedophile? Not All of Them Are Child Abusers, and They Often Believe That Their Victims Don't Really Suffer
They are almost always men, but can be of any age and sexual orientation. More victimize girls than boys. They tend to live alone or with a parent, are often unemployed or in a low-paying job and have trouble forming adult relationships. They usually...
Who's in the Driver's Seat? Automotive: Ford Dealers Survived Dot-Com Invaders. Now, They're Facing a New Web Challenge: Their Manufacturer
A bell chimes from a computer in an office near the showroom at Oasis Ford in Old Bridge, N.J. A potential customer has just wandered onto the dealership's Web site and sent an e-mail query. In seconds, a salesman responds to the message and tries...