Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 27

Africa: Now, a 'Quiet Revolution': Mobile Phones Leapfrog an Obstacle to Development
Strive Masiyiwa is an entrepreneur on a mission. As earnest as his own first name, Masiyiwa, 42, wants to make the mobile telephone a communications tool for Africa's masses--as cheap and basic as the hand-cranked party line was for Americans early...
Alice's Wonderland: With Just One Restaurant, This Chef Changed How We Eat. Thirty Years Later, Her 'Delicious Revolution' Continues
Over the past 30 years, Alice Waters, creator and proprietor of Chez Panisse in Berkeley, Calif., has revolutionized the way Americans think about food. In an attempt to recreate the memorable dining experiences she had as a college student in France,...
An Idea Whose Time Has Come. Whites Have an Obligation to Recognize Slavery's Legacy
In 1854 my great-grandfather, Morris Marable, was sold on an auction block in Georgia for $500. For his white slave master, the sale was just "business as usual." But to Morris Marable and his heirs, slavery was a crime against our humanity. This pattern...
A Phatty Boom Batty Flick: With His New Movie, Director Kevin Smith Says Thanks to Family, Friends and, Yes, Those Nutty Fans on the Web
The first person you meet on the set of Kevin Smith's new movie, "Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back," is a guy named Ratface. He is Smith's production designer, a job usually held by extravagant Italians or tasteful women. Ratface, ne Robert Holtzman,...
Cyberscope: This Week: The Newest PlayStation 2 Games, Surf Report, Journalists Beware, and More!
HOT PROPERTY Blood, Sweat And Tackles In NCAA football 2002 ($49.95; Electronic Arts, eagames.com) for the PlayStation 2, the line between live action and computer-animation gets fuzzier than ever. Every Division I-A college player is realistically...
Debating the Wages of Slavery: Paying African-Americans Reparations Is an Idea as Old as the Republic. So Why Has It Suddenly Become the Hottest Civil-Rights Issue of the Day? the Anatomy of a Crusade
How many of you have heard of reparations?" activist-attorney Adjoa A. Aiyetoro asks a crowd of 200 African-Americans gathered at Agape Missionary Baptist Church in Chicago on a recent Saturday afternoon. About 10 hands go up. Undeterred, she explains...
Don't Lose It: Seven Tips: The First Maxim When It Comes to Debt: You Don't Save Money by Borrowing Even More
You've got credit-card bloat, a monster mortgage and an expensive auto lease. You're saving for retirement but not nearly enough. If you have kids, you haven't a clue how they'll get through school. And then there are the little things, like food....
Exclusive: A Pardon Overheard: New Transcripts Reveal Clinton and Barak's Private Chats about Marc Rich
Bill Clinton's political antennae were, as always, on high alert. On Jan. 8, with less than two weeks to go in his presidency, Clinton was speaking on the phone with the then Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak. The subject: a possible pardon for fugitive...
Hello from the U.S. of Type A: The President Is Taking a Nice Vacation. Why Can't He Arrange for America to Join Him?
George W. Bush and I have been on vacation at the same time, both of us in small towns shimmering in the heat, full of corn fields and, at least in my case, lumbering rodents with powerful suicidal impulses stiffening on the road shoulder. It's a working...
Keeping the War Alive: Japan Needs to Confront Its Past Honestly-And the Same Is True for Its Former Asian Enemies
If the art of modern politics is triangulation--finding a middle ground between right and left--then Junichiro Koizumi's visit to the Yasukuni shrine last week was a study in failure. First, the Japanese prime minister tried to please right-wing nationalists...
Mail Call
The Ban: Support and Sorrow More than 600 readers responded to our cover story on the Boy Scouts' ban on gays, with a small majority favoring it. "Scouting should be a place for boys to work and play without political issues dominating every activity,"...
Maxed Out: A Nation of Shoppers, We Financed the Boom of the '90S with a Heavy Reliance on Credit. Now, with the Economy Slowing, the Bill for Our Record Borrowing May Finally Be Coming Due
Frank and Naomi Cooper have a secret for sound sleep: debt-free living. Frank, 86, remembers baling hay for 50 cents a day during the Depression, so he refuses to take financial risks. He paid cash for his house. He once burned a credit-card offer...
Money Notes
STOCKS Alive at Five Investors who worry about paying too much for stocks can start looking to the stars for guidance. Morningstar, the Chicago research firm whose widely followed rating service gives five stars to the best-performing mutual...
Newsmakers
The Queen's Consent? Despite speculation that Prince Charles will walk down the aisle with Camilla Parker Bowles (not another public kiss!), royal watchers insist such a move is unlikely, if not impossible. The Spectator, known for its accuracy...
... or a Childish Illusion of Justice? Reparations Enshrine Victimhood, Dishonoring Our Ancestors
My father was born in the last year of the 19th century. His father was very likely born into slavery, though there are no official records to confirm this. Still, from family accounts, I can plausibly argue that my grandfather was born a slave. ...
Periscope
EXCLUSIVE The Lee Case: A Damning Report By Michael Isikoff How badly did the U.S. government bungle the investigation of Wen Ho Lee, the ex-Los Alamos scientist once suspected of turning over the country's most prized nuclear secrets to China?...
Perspectives
"This is obviously a planted story." Dick Wadhams, spokesman for tough-on-drugs Colorado Gov. Bill Owens, whose yard contains a plant identified by botanical experts as marijuana "Things that should be bipartisan can turn partisan. Things that should...
Platitudes or Prophecy? Sure, They Sell. but Are They Serious? NEWSWEEK's Religion Guru Opines about the New Spiritual Best Sellers
Sociologists tell us that the United States is experiencing a religious revival--a third "great awakening" echoing those of the 18th and 19th centuries. But if the best-seller lists are any guide, the revival looks more like a collective leaving of...
The Best Health Care Goes Only So Far: Death Is Natural and Inevitable. So Why Spend Billions Pretending We Can Stave It off Forever?
Modern lore has it that in England death is imminent, in Canada inevitable and in California optional. Small wonder. Americans' life expectancy has nearly doubled over the past century. Failing hips can be replaced, clinical depression controlled,...
The Growing Risks of Fringe Lending: As the Economy Falters, Lending to Folks with Bad Credit Is Proving to Be a Very Big Problem
Flip on the TV at 3 a.m. and you'll see how much banking has changed in the last decade. Slick announcers shouting "Bad credit? No problem!" entice once ignored, debt-laden consumers with the offer of easy credit and quick cash. Since 1995 there has...
The Hard Sell: In the Fiercely Competitive Publishing World, a Well-Strategized Book Tour-With Escorts, 'In-Store Events' and Local Media-Can Pay off Big Time
In the middle of a 20-city book tour, E. Lynn Harris is getting just a mite frayed. At the Shrine of the Black Madonna bookstore in Atlanta, he has read from his new best seller, "Any Way the Wind Blows," his seventh novel full of racy bisexual romance....
The New Green Game: Tradable Allowances for Greenhouse Gases May One Day Become the World's Biggest Commodities Market
Giant multinational corporations aren't often seen as saviors of the rain forest. But this past May an American environmental nonprofit called The Nature Conservancy persuaded General Motors to part with $10 million for rebuilding a Brazilian rain...
The 'Non-Recession' Has America in Denial: No One Wants to Mention the R Word, despite Ample Evidence That the Economy Is Getting Weaker
Back in the late 1970s, Cornell University economist Alfred Kahn briefly oversaw the Carter administration's voluntary wage-price guidelines. Kahn was (and is) a jovial soul whose power and influence suffered from his stubborn candor and sense of humor....
There She Is, Your Ideal: Who's the Fairest of Them All? the Post-Internet Market for Initial Public Offerings Casts Its Vote for Start-Ups in the Health-Care Industry
Modern medicine is a source of hope and comfort to more than the sickly. With Wall Street otherwise limping along, the health-care industry is making investment bankers feel better than they have since the tech bubble burst. The battered mar-ket in...
The Science of Summer: Researchers Need Vacations, Too. So When the Mercury Soars, Their Thoughts May Turn to Such Burning Questions as Why Pop Flies Sound Different from Home Runs and Why Ice Cream Tastes So Good. Who Says Science Isn't Fun?
SAND: Building a Castle in the Sky The 80 master sand sculptors gathering at Harrison Hot Springs in British Columbia next month for the 2001 World Championship won't build their mermaids, cathedrals, swans and Bill Clinton caricatures with just...
The Solidarity of Self-Interest: Reparations Are Gaining Support Abroad, Too. but U.S. Advocates Are Learning That Their New Allies Aren't Always on the Same Page
History cannot be rewritten, but some of its more egregious errors can be corrected--at least in part, at least symbolically, even unto the fifth and sixth generation. Or so assume a growing number of human-rights advocates. And their efforts to square...
'We Have to Sacrifice': States Offer to Pick Up the Tab for Unpaid Leave
When Gina Garro and Brian Duplisea adopted 4-month-old Andres from Colombia last month, they were determined to take time off from work to care for him. Six years ago, after their daughter, Melina, was born, the family scraped by on Duplisea's $36,000...
What Did the CIA Know: Ante Gotovina Stands Accused of War Crimes. Now the Croat Wants His Former Allies in U.S. Intelligence to Help Prove Him Innocent
At a secluded military base on Croatia's Adriatic coast, an unpiloted CIA plane rolled down the runway, then climbed slowly over tall pine trees and headed into hostile airspace. It was July 1995, and a new conflict was brewing. Serbian leader Slobodan...
Why Can't We Live Together? A Comedy about a Hippie Commune in Swinging Stockholm
The old joke goes that if you remember the '60s, you probably weren't there. This may help explain why Swedish writer-director Lukas Moodysson seems to remember this era with uncanny accuracy: he wasn't there. Moodysson was born in 1969. Which would...