Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from January 14

A Couch Potato's Digital Dream: Meet the Moxi, Which Hopes to Replace Half Your Media Gadgets and Control the Rest
Byline: Steven Levy If you sold your company to Microsoft, how would you splurge? Steve Perlman dropped about a million bucks outfitting his Lake Tahoe, Calif., retreat with a self-designed digital home entertainment center, where TV, video, music...
A Face-Off with Nuclear Stakes: How India Is Using Bush's War on Terror to Force Pakistan's Hand
Byline: Joshua Hammer Hassan Dil is getting ready to move into his backyard bunker. A retired, half-blind schoolteacher from the border village of Golkot in Indian-controlled Kashmir, Dil is in the direct line of fire of Pakistani soldiers perched...
A New Routine: An Olympic Figure-Skating Program Is Not All about Jumps, Spins and Stamina. It's Also about Music, Mood and Pacing Yourself. but Sometimes Even a 'Jumping Machine' like Jennifer Kirk Has to Start from Scratch
Byline: Mark Starr Coach Mary Scotvold couldn't fathom what had gone wrong with Jennifer Kirk's skating performance in Germany last November. A year earlier, Kirk--then world junior champion--had dazzled a Paris audience with her "Nutcracker." But...
Ansen's Top 15: Our Critic Picks His Best and Brightest from the Pack
Byline: David Ansen I was tempted to put "Apocalypse Now Redux" at the top of my list: the first two thirds of it made for the most exhilarating moviegoing of the year. But then I would have had to bump a real 2001 movie from the list, and there...
Betting on a Recovery: The Signals Are Mixed, but There's Enough Positive Evidence of a Turn in the Economy That Forecasters Are Forming an Optimists' Club
Byline: Daniel McGinn Alan Greenspan isn't the type to give high-fives or dance in the end zone. But if his Federal Reserve colleagues were an NFL team, they might be sending the waterboy to the locker room to ice the champagne. One year after chairman...
Economy 2002 Profiles: How Americans Are Coping with the Recession
LOW RATES HELPED A DREAM COME TRUE Troy and Mandy Weaver Cartersville, Ga. Service manager/bank teller Just before September 11, the Weavers made an offer on their dream vacation home, a condo on St. Simons Island, off the Georgia coast....
John Nash's Renunciation: 'A Beautiful Mind'-The Book and the Movie-Will Increase Empathy for the Mentally Ill
Byline: George F. Will A quaint ceremonious village" is how an elderly villager, Albert Einstein, described Princeton. There, in 1948, a first-year graduate student from West Virginia dropped by Einstein's office to suggest improvements to the great...
Letters: Readers on John Walker, Secret Military Tribunals, Afghan Women and Patriotism vs. Prayer
A Lost American Son John Walker is definitely guilty of treason ("A Long, Strange Trip to the Taliban," Dec. 17). He made his choices and now he should have to pay for them. He knew exactly what he was doing over there. Maybe at first he thought...
Main Street's Sharp Turn off Wall Street: The Market Is Up. Does the Smart Money Know Something You Don't about the Recovery?
Byline: Allan Sloan If you're a typical American, the one leading economic indicator that you run across in your daily life is the stock market. You can barely turn around, it seems, without hearing, seeing or reading what the Dow industrials or...
Making It through 2002: While You're Waiting for Better Times, Make Sure Your Job Is Safe, Then Save and Pay off Debt
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Investors are peering over the valley to sunny, dollar-green hills beyond. But down in the shadows, companies are still laying off workers, and new jobs can be hard to find. While you're waiting to see what's really going...
My Deep, Dark Secret? I Miss My Family. I'm through Trying to Prove My Maturity by Living Far from My Parents. First Chance I Get, I'm Going Home
Byline: Hadley Moore When I was applying to colleges as a high-school senior I wanted nothing more than to go somewhere far, far from home. I believed, as so many young people do, that my success and maturity would be measured largely by how far...
Newsmakers
Byline: Lorraine Ali, Jeff Giles and Marc Peyser Dick's Grammy Whammy Should the Grammys be renamed the Greedys? Dick Clark, founder of the American Music Awards, thinks so. In a $10 million lawsuit Clark filed against Recording Academy president...
Odyssey into Jihad: April Ray's Husband Became Bin Laden's Secretary. Now He's Behind Bars. Her Brush with the Shadowy World of Al Qaeda
Byline: Kevin Peraino and Evan Thomas She drives a dark green minivan with a "My child is an honor student..." bumper sticker on the back. She scrimps and saves in discount shopping malls. Her kids like to watch "The Simpsons" and the WWF. (Her...
Optimists-Or Just Dreamers? Economic Forecasters May Be Deluding Themselves If They Are Counting on a Quick, Strong Recovery
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson We need to avoid the nostalgia factor--a longing for the late lamented economic boom that clouds our vision and corrodes our judgment. People understandably yearn to return to the good old days of the late 1990s. It won't...
Osama's Hidden Tax: How Can America Insure Itself against Future Terrorist Attacks? the Answer Isn't Politically Easy, but the Stakes Couldn't Be Higher
Byline: Steven Brill Your favorite baseball team announces a 20 percent boost in ticket prices this spring, and the owners blame it not on the signing of some superstar but on September 11. You try to get a bite to eat at some tourist attraction,...
Periscope
Byline: Sharon Begley and Debra Rosenberg; Mark Hosenball; Daniel Klaidman; Peg Tyre; Cathleen McGuigan; Bret Begun with John Ness; John Horn AIR CONTROVERSY The Latest Trouble With Racial Profiling All that American Airlines and lawyers for...
Perspectives
"A lot of angels up there... will be getting their wings." Countdown Entertainment president Jeffrey Straus, an organizer of New York's Times Square festivities, on honoring September 11 victims with somber bell ringing during the usually raucous New...
Posh Spice, Naughty Spice: An Assured Altman Concocts a Tale Part 'Upstairs, Downstairs,' Part 'Murder on the Orient Express'
Byline: David Ansen Seventy-six-year-old director Robert Altman is in an unusually mellow mood in "Gosford Park," a comedy of manners/murder mystery set in a grand English country house in 1932. Altman has always prided himself on his subversions...
Revered-And Yet Repressed: The Deeply Ambivalent Role Women Play in Bin Laden's World
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Gretel C. Kovach In the cosmos as defined by Osama bin Laden, men and women have very clear roles. Men are the warriors, and the foremost among them become martyrs. For their sacrifice, they are promised 72 virgins...
The Education of a President: Harvard's New Leader Is Right to Try to Raise Standards-But He Needs to Do It for Everyone
Byline: Fareed Zakaria In my first week as an undergraduate at college I remember being puzzled at how eagerly everyone on campus was looking forward to one of the formal ceremonies of the week, the president's welcoming address. In fact the expectations...
The Green Berets Up Close: On the Ground with the Special Forces Who Turned the Tide-And Just Lost One of Their Own. A NEWSWEEK Exclusive
Byline: Donatella Lorch They landed in darkness on an early November night, deep in the mountains of northern Afghanistan. For six hours, they'd hunkered down in the freezing hold of the transport helicopter, tossed by heavy winds, before setting...
The Next Beltway Battle: Bush and Daschle Start the Economic Smackdown. How the Fight May Affect the Bottom Line
Byline: Howard Fineman As usual in Washington, the relationship was forged in conviviality--and calculation. Early in 2001, George W. Bush invited Tom Daschle to dinner in the private quarters of the White House. Later, each said he saw a desire...
Tops of the Morning: He's Got a New Little Baby. She's Got a Big New Contract. Now They Both Face New Challenges. Katie Couric and Matt Lauer Talk about Life on and off 'Today.'
Byline: Marc Peyser Tom and Nicole may now be the most famous unmarried couple in America, but Katie Couric and Matt Lauer run a close second. They've been cohosting the "Today" show for five years, and if you feel you know them because they come...