Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from April 22

A Delicate Challenge: The International Space Station Gets Its Backbone-But Will It Ever Be Anything More Than an Expensive Toy?
Byline: Fred Guterl and Adam Rogers By the time Lee Morin had rocketed up in the space shuttle Atlantis last week, he had rehearsed his mission for more than a year in NASA's Neutral Buoyancy Lab. But sloshing around in a big bathtub doesn't really...
A Radical's Work Grows Old-Not So Gracefully: Are Barnett Newman's Legendary Paintings Still Shocking and Profound, or Just Pretentious?
Byline: Peter Plagens You can almost imagine old Barnett Newman doing stand-up. Monocle attached to his mustached, Gene Hackmanesque face, the belt line of his heavy suit hovering just under his armpits, a short biblike necktie adding a little color,...
A War's Human Toll: Israel Wins a Fierce Battle, but the Victory Gives Birth to Another Saga of Blood and Fire
Publisher clarification: 22 May 2002 In "A War's Human Toll" (April 22) we said that Apache helicopters were shooting 800mm rounds over the Jenin refugee camp. We should have said they shot 30mm rounds. ________________________ Byline: Joshua Hammer...
Briefcase: Updates on the Latest Medical Treatments
Byline: Stephen P. Williams HERBAL REMEDIES Depressing Results Last year Americans bought about 165 million doses of St. John's wort, an herb commonly used to treat depression. A double-blind trial of 340 people run by Duke University Medical...
Business Crisis? Rudy Has Some Advice. Giuliani's Ventures as New York's Ex-Mayor
Byline: Matt Bai What exactly does one call Rudy Giuliani these days? Mr. Ex-Mayor? Sir Rudolph? "Whatever anybody wants to call me," Giuliani says. "I have all kinds of names. Mr. Mayor. Mr. Former Mayor. Rudy. I can't tell you the other names."...
'Don't Dumb Them Down': A New Study by an Expert on Web Design Shows What's Wrong-And Even Dangerous-About Kids' Sites
Web-design guru Jakob Nielsen this week is releasing "Usability of Websites for Children," a study that analyzes how youngsters (ages 5-11) navigate their way through popular kids' sites. The report (coauthored by Shuli Gilutz, his colleague at the...
Even in the Worst of Times, Life Goes On: I Came to Israel to Understand the Region's Conflict. What I'm Learning Is How to Endure despite Fear
Byline: Ken Lee Waiting for the bus in Jerusalem is never boring. I live a few miles south of the old-city walls, and venture downtown at least three times a week to do errands or meet friends. Often, as I stand shoulder to shoulder with ultraorthodox...
Franchise Fever! A Good Movie Isn't Good Enough. Hollywood Craves Prequels, Sequels, Toys and Theme-Park Rides
Byline: John Horn How quickly does success breed imitation? In Hollywood, it takes about 48 hours. In the summer of 2000, Universal Pictures chairman Stacey Snider and production president Kevin Misher sat in Universal's eighth-floor screening room,...
Hepatitis C: The Insidious Spread of a Killer Virus: This Stealthy Disease Can Incubate for Decades. Now Thousands of People Are Getting Sick. by 2010 It May Strike Down More Americans Each Year Than AIDS
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley Merrily Anderson was an actuary's dream when her life-insurance policy came up for renewal three years ago. At 50 years old, she had enjoyed good health and a happy marriage all her adult life. There was no illness in her...
How the WSJ Is like Jell-O: Like Many Graying Brands, the Once Reserved Newspaper Hopes a New Look Will Keep It Young
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson If you read the Wall Street Journal, you got a surprise April 9: a redesigned paper. It had a new section, Personal Journal, that was filled with what we in the business call "news you can use." One story asked, "Should...
Keeping Different Kinds of Vows: Is Marriage a Solution to the Sex Scandals Rocking the Catholic Church Worldwide? Just Ask Father Gremmels. He Has a Wife, Three Kids and a Minivan
Byline: Daniel McGinn Father John Gremmels, a Roman Catholic priest, was new to his parish when he went grocery shopping near his church in Ft. Worth, Texas, a few years ago. As he pushed his cart, he held hands with an attractive woman, setting...
Laughter's New Profile: Since September 11, Arab-American Comics Have Been Wowing Crowds-And Puncturing Stereotypes
Byline: Lorraine Ali Profiling. Detainment. Hate crimes. It's no fun being an Arab-American now--unless you also happen to be a comedian. "I went to the airport check-in counter," says Egyptian-American comic Ahmed Ahmed to a packed room at L.A.'s...
Man in the Middle: Lebanon's Prime Minister on Border Violence and How to Avoid a Wider War
Byline: Lally Weymouth Guerrillas in Lebanon have been firing rockets into Israel and Israeli-controlled territory, prompting worries of a wider Middle East war. Can Lebanon stop the attacks, or is the government too weak? And to what extent does...
Mayor Mike, Inc. Mike Bloomberg Has Brought His Quirky Entrepreneurialism to New York City, Presiding over a Cubicle Culture of Nonstop Work-And Junk Food
Byline: Matt Bai New York's new mayor clearly feels out of place in his official corner office, with its view of the plaza outside and its paintings plucked from the city's finest collections. He stares warily at the stately oak desk where Rudy...
Middle East: A Blueprint for Peace: Amid Appalling Violence, Coexistence Seems Impossible. but the Key Now May Be to Concentrate on the Endgame
Byline: Christopher Dickey and Daniel Klaidman Adnan Attiyah is still shaky after his ordeal in a West Bank town under assault by the Israeli Army. "We couldn't get out the door, couldn't look out the window," he says. But after almost two weeks...
Newsmakers
Byline: Lorraine Ali, Julie Scelfo, Devin Gordon and N'Gai Croal A Star's Fall From Grace R&B crooner R. Kelly once believed he could fly. But since a home video surfaced of what appears to be the singer having sex with a young girl--who...
Oxy's Offspring: Addiction. Crime Sprees. and Now, Signs That a Powerful Painkiller May Be Infecting the Nursery
Byline: Debra Rosenberg Nancy Green had never heard of the prescription painkiller OxyContin when the first addict showed up at her office in the fall of 2000. Track marks studded the young woman's arm. And she was seven-months pregnant. Green,...
Periscope
Byline: Colin Soloway; Michael Isikoff; Eleanor Clift; Mark Hosenball; Bret Begun; Lorraine Ali; Katherine Stroup; Pat Wingert; Susannah Meadows Operation Anaconda: What the Pilots Saw At approximately 3 a.m. local time on March 4, Razor 3, piloted...
Perspectives
"These are murderers. It's not suicide, it's murder." White House press secretary Ari Fleischer, defending his use of the term "homicide bomber" "Somehow it moved." Los Angeles International Airport spokesman Harold Johnson, on the parked American...
Powell's Path to Jerusalem: It Was Strewn with Discarded Preconditions for a Meeting with Arafat, Who Disdained Them
Byline: George F. Will Last week The Washington Post reported "the belief held by many Israelis that the recent suicide bombings are an example of anti-Jewish violence." Those who hold this "belief" reject alternative explanations of the violence,...
Risking Life to Give Life: As Demand for Transplants Soars, End-Stage Hepatitis C Patients Turn to Their Family Members for a Last Chance
Byline: Mary Carmichael The two middle-aged women sitting in Dr. Lewis Teperman's transplant-surgery office are sisters, but they don't look it. One, jaundiced and frail, is waiting to die of hepatitis C-induced cirrhosis. The other, flushed and...
Say, Can I Get Glossies of My Colonoscopy? New Services Keep Digital Archives of Your Medical Tests
Byline: Wayne J. Guglielmo Petting a burro on your grandparents' farm isn't exactly steer roping. But when a 5-year-old Dallas girl tried it during a birthday weekend in 1993, the normally docile animal bit her in the abdomen. The girl's life was...
She's Killing Us Softly: Pass the Courvoisier, Ashanti's Debut Lands at No. 1
Byline: N'Gai Croal What do you get a girl who has the No. 1 album and the No. 1 single in the country? For 21-year-old Ashanti, who looks like a million bucks in her chic navy-blue tracksuit--thong peeking over the waistline, natch --and a single...
The Democrats: The Second Coming: After a Year in Exile, Gore Opens Fire in Florida. Let Campaign 2004 Begin. (Yep, Here We Go Again.)
Byline: Howard Fineman The introduction music was U2, stadium volume. The posters were slick, expensive and ubiquitous, featuring a map of Florida and the words STILL GORE COUNTRY! By the time the celebrity victim and former almost-president took...
The Elusive Executive: A Burned-Out Businessman Weaves a Tangled White-Collar Lie in a Taut and Disturbing French Thriller
Byline: David Ansen The hardworking hero of Laurent Cantet's haunting, remarkable "Time Out" ("L'Emploi du Temps") spends many busy hours behind the wheel of his car, on his cell phone, studying flowcharts or, like many another stressed- out white-collar...
The Prostate Plan: Fresh Findings Suggest That Changes in Diet and Lifestyle May Slow Prostate Cancer. If the Results Hold Up, Surgery and Radiation Won't Be the Main Choices
Byline: David Noonan and Karen Springen When John Stone found out he had prostate cancer, he researched the conventional interventions, including surgery and radiation, and quickly learned the harsh truth--they don't always work, and can cause impotence...