Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from August 26

A Blog about Writing about Blogs: Here's What a Weblog Looks like, with Latest Entry First. Multiply by 500,000
August 15, 2002 3:18 p.m. Came across another blog where the author spoke about being contacted by NEWSWEEK. Reminder: put Blogorrhea in the glossary. 2:16 p.m. Talked to Rebecca Blood, who wrote The Weblog Handbook. She thinks that bloggers take...
A Dangerous Place: As the Violence in Israel Keeps Young American Jews at Home, There Is Fear That a Generation Will Lose Touch with Its Heritage
Byline: Seth Mnookin In January, Hannah Janal went to Israel for a 10-day trip sponsored by Birthright Israel, a group that foots the bill for any 18- to 26-year-old who wants to visit the country. Before the trip, she says, she was merely a "High...
Autos: Deals on Wheels
Byline: --Keith Naughton Forget about bargain hunting in the wreckage of the stock market. The best deals these days are on new-car lots. That might sound like some car-dealer come-on, but as the auto industry closes out its 2002 model year, rebates,...
Betting against a Housing Bust: With Mortgage Rates at Record Lows and Home Prices Soaring, Trendy 'McMansions' Look like Safer Investments Than Stocks. Are They? No One Has More Riding on the Answer Than Robert Toll
Byline: Daniel Mcginn Robert Toll and four colleagues are sitting around his office, trading jokes and gentle barbs. The atmosphere resembles a poker game--only instead of cards, the men huddle over a map of southern California. One of Toll's aides...
Borrowing 101
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn It's panic time for a lot of families whose students head to college next month. Maybe your job suddenly feels insecure or the money you saved for tuition lies buried in the stock market. For a crying towel, call the...
Fitting Our Marriage in between Beeps: My Husband and I Wed Just One Month before He Began His Residency. I've Barely Seen Him Since
Byline: Mary K. Moore It's 4 a.m., and the familiar beeping sound pierces our quiet bedroom: my husband's pager. This is not the first time tonight, nor will it be the last. My husband is a resident at a New York hospital. Married the month before...
'Hairspray' Hits Broadway: What a Makeover! John Waters's Camp Classic about Teen Angst Is Now a Big, Beautiful Bouffant of a Musical
Byline: Marc Peyser Of all the minor miracles in the Broadway musical "Hairspray," nothing beats what happens at a place called Mr. Pinky's Hefty Hideaway. The Hideaway specializes in "quality clothes for quantity gals," and thank goodness someone's...
In Search of A Grown-Up
Byline: Anna Quindlen A good defense attorney uses what he's got, and what David Westerfield's attorney had was what is euphemistically called "lifestyle." Much of the evidence didn't look good for Westerfield as he stood trial in San Diego for...
IRAQ: Taking the Debate Public
Byline: Martha Brant Even when he's engaging in political warfare, Gen. Brent Scowcroft is courteous. Last week, the day before his op-ed titled "Don't Attack Saddam" appeared in The Wall Street Journal, he faxed a copy over to national-security...
Letters: An Eternal Source of Fascination and Mystery
Readers of widely differing beliefs responded to our Aug. 12 cover story and shared their visions of an afterlife--or the lack thereof. Some found heaven and hell too transcendent a subject for debate. Such discussions, said one, are "at best a lesson...
Living in the Blog-Osphere: Welcome to the World of a Half Million (and Counting) Weblogs, Where Anyone Can Instantly Publish His Passions and Favorite Weblinks. and the Fun's Just Begun
Byline: Steven Levy Zack was an insecure kid who clowned around in high school and felt that no one really liked him. About a year ago he started a Weblog, or blog--an easy-to-maintain journal-like personal Web site where he could express his feelings...
Nasty Infections: As the Government Cracks Down on Tissue Banks, Patients Worry about Safety and Consider Their Options
Byline: Claudia Kalb Last week Joseph Connolly, 31, got a call from his surgeon with some unsettling news: a piece of cadaver tendon implanted in Connolly's knee in February was processed by CryoLife, the company ordered by the FDA last week to...
Newsmakers
Leonardo DiCaprio fans have been beached for two years, waiting for the King of the World's return to the screen. But is this really what they had in mind--two new Leo movies set to open the same day? In a bizarre scheduling fight, both Steven Spielberg's...
Perspectives
"Believe me, the United States is very popular now in Iraqi Kurdistan." Jalal Talabani, founder and secretary-general of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, who was in Washington last week for a meeting between Bush administration officials and Iraqi...
Roadside Kitsch: Right This Way for the Biggest, Deepest, Longest, Tallest, Strangest Thing You Have Ever Seen in Your Life. Guaranteed
Byline: Jonathan Darman and David Noonan They are vestiges of simpler times, those long-ago days before theme parks when sweaty parents packed their sweaty kids into the family station wagon and headed out in search of something--anything--to entertain...
The Battle over Butts: If the Big Apple Bans Smoking, Who Will Be Next?
Byline: Seth Mnookin Dawn Berry was having a rough day: the temperature had topped 90 degrees in New York for what seemed like the millionth day in a row and a client had given her grief at work. At around 1 in the morning she was finally relaxing,...
The Death Convoy of Afghanistan: Witness Reports and the Probing of a Mass Grave Point to War Crimes. Does the United States Have Any Responsibility for the Atrocities of Its Allies? A NEWSWEEK Investigation
Byline: Babak Dehghanpisheh, John Barry and Roy Gutman Trudging over the moonscape of Dasht-e Leili, a desolate expanse of low rolling hills in northern Afghanistan, Bill Haglund spotted clues half-buried in the gray-beige sand. Strings of prayer...
The Economic Blame Game
Byline: Robert J. Samuelson The economic blame game is now in full swing, with President George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Alan Greenspan all accused of causing the economy's troubles. Although none is guilty, the game will continue, because the...
The Editor's Desk
Byline: -Mark Whitaker For months, there were hints that something awful had happened. In early December, as Taliban prisoners who surrendered at the battle of Konduz were arriving at Sheberghan prison in northern Afghanistan, a New York Times correspondent...
The End of Baseball Again: Players and Owners Are Working Hard to Kill the Game. Are They Crazy? Here's a Way to Fix the Sport: Total Free Agency
Byline: David A. Kaplan Sixty years ago, "Memphis Bill" Terry had it right. "Baseball," said the manager and Hall of Fame first baseman of the old New York Giants, "must be a great game to survive the fools who run it. No business in the world has...
The Long, Slow Summer: Kids' Flicks, the Season's Staple, Bomb at the Box Office
Byline: John Horn It's a terrifying tale of unexplained phenomena--a movie story so disturbing, even show-business veterans are losing sleep. The alien attack in "Signs"? No, the box-office disappearance of "Stuart Little 2." The sequel wasn't expected...
The Road Show: Bedeviled by a Rocky Economy and Mounting Debate over His Iraq Plans, Bush Tours the Heartland-With a Trusted Old Friend in Tow
Byline: Martha Brant and Tamara Lipper George W. Bush is always on the lookout for a new running mate. Down on his Crawford ranch for summer vacation, the president likes to take his daily three-mile jog in the brutal Texas heat, and goads his staffers...
The Tunes You Can't Refuse: From a Secret Place in Southern Italy, Where Old World Mafia Songs Were Born, Comes a CD That Celebrates the Romance and Violence of Malavita
Byline: Lorraine Ali It's just past midnight, the mafia feast is in full swing and I'm playing a game in my head called Who's the Boss? It's not easy to focus while distracted by the smell of roast sausages, the taste of sweet white wine and the...
TV: Lobbying for a Little Restraint
Byline: -Julie Scelfo As the first anniversary of the 9-11 attacks draws nearer, victims' families are quietly waging a letter-writing campaign asking TV networks to provide warnings before airing graphic footage of the attacks. Carie Lemack, a...