Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 8

Amending Their Ways: Author of a Bid to Enshrine Marriage Has Surprising Allies
Byline: Debra Rosenberg Matt Daniels was ahead of his time. Long before gay marriage became a potent political issue--even before it was a realistic possibility in the eyes of gay activists--Daniels worried that liberal judges might one day overturn...
A Step Past Chemotherapy
Byline: Claudia Kalb Cancer researchers are a stubborn lot. They know the numbers: more than 1,500 Americans die from cancer every day. They know the enemy: an insidious disease that ravages virtually every organ in the body, killing children and...
Breast Implants: Continue to Be Cautious: There Is Still No End to the Controversy over Implant Safety
Byline: Robert H. Shmerling, M.D. For a while this fall, it looked as if silicone breast implants were poised to make a comeback. The Food and Drug Administration pushed the devices off the market in 1992 because of safety concerns. Unhappy recipients,...
Conservatism, Um, Evolving: Congressional Republicans Must Assume They Will Never Be in the Minority and Vulnerable to Payback. They Are Mistaken
Byline: George F. Will By the time the conservatives running Congress and this conservative president are done doing what they think will win the next election, tweezers may be needed to pick up the remnants of conservatism as traditionally understood....
Decoding 'The Da Vinci Code'
For millions, the phenomenal best seller is their introduction to the arcane and mysterious 'shadow history' of the early church. Herewith, an attempt to separate truth from fiction. Did Leonardo include Mary Magdalene in his "Last Supper"? Most...
Fighting the Fund Cheats: What You Don't Know Can Cost You. A Guide to What Money Managers Hide
Byline: Jane Bryant Quinn Are you disgusted enough with mutual funds to raise a stink? So far, savers don't seem nearly as outraged as they were about Enron--yet deceptive funds and sneaky "financial advisers" have swiped more money, from more people,...
Gangland's New Face: The South Sees a Surge in Violence by Latino Groups
Byline: Arian Campo-Flores The initiation began with a ritual beating. On a hot summer day in 1999, in the wooded area of a Charlotte, N.C., park, some 70 gang members encircled "Jorge." Three of them stepped forward and unleashed a fury of fists...
Getting Rid of Extra Pounds
Publisher correction: December 19, 2003 A photo/diagram that accompanied the article "Getting Rid of Extra Pounds" (Dec. 8), part of our report on the top medical stories of 2003, referred incorrectly to Topiramate. Though often prescribed as a weight-loss...
God's Woman Trouble: Scholars Who Explore the Role of Women in the Bible with a Political Agenda in Mind Only Hurt Their Cause
Byline: Kenneth L. Woodward Pity poor Mary Magdalene. For nearly two millenniums she was loved and honored by Christians as the archetypal reformed sinner. Then, a half-century ago, Biblical scholars recognized that she was a victim of mistaken...
Going beyond Prozac
Byline: Michael C. Miller, M.D. In his 1968 novel "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" (which inspired the movie "Blade Runner"), Philip K. Dick introduced his hero fighting with his wife over what mood to be in. The couple, living in the dreary...
Growing Up Healthy, Afterward: How to Avoid the Long-Term Effects of Kids' Cancer Treatments
Byline: Claudia Kalb New cancer drugs may have their biggest impact on the littlest patients. Conventional treatments have worked wonders in children with cancer: before 1970, young patients had little chance of survival; today, three quarters make...
How Genes Affect Moods
Byline: Michael C. Miller, M.D. Genes don't stop working the day we're born. They're active throughout life, switching on and off in response to cues from the environment. Unfortunately, they don't always respond in optimal ways. For every 100 people...
How to Halt Another Outbreak: Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Infected 8,098 People in 2003; 774 Died
Byline: Fred Guterl At this time of the year, the animal markets in southern China's Guangdong province are usually crowded with civets, raccoon dogs, turtles, snakes and even kittens, all destined for local restaurants. Entrees in this part of...
How Would My Rape Shape My Kids' Lives? I'd Always Taught My Daughters to Be Fearless. Now I Had to Tell Them How Treacherous the World Can Be
Byline: Ellen Sussman Years ago, when I was 18 and traveling in a foreign country, I was raped and left to die. I now have two daughters, one 15, one 17--almost the age I was then. I have vanquished most of the demons that have haunted me since...
Into the Darkness of the Mind: Alzheimer's Cost U.S. Businesses about $61 Billion Last Year
Byline: Anne Underwood When Wayne Huizenga of Blockbuster fame bought the Miami Dolphins in 1994, he asked a trusted colleague to write the $127 million check: Gillian Bristol of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. Bristol handled important financial matters for...
Muppets with a Message of Hope: Using Cartoons and Soap Operas to Promote Public Health
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley UNICEF may be a household acronym all over the world, but the agency knows its limitations. So when executive director Carol Bellamy took the stage in Geneva last week to unveil a new report on Africa's orphan crisis, she...
New Inroads against AIDS
Byline: Geoffrey Cowley Strolling through San Francisco's Castro district or New York's Chelsea--places where wheelchairs and funeral processions crowded the sidewalks a decade ago--you might guess that the scourge of AIDS had been beaten. In a...
Newsmakers
Byline: Jac Chebatoris and David Gates, Vanessa Juarez Mrs. Claus's Cause President Bush wasn't the only one to spring a holiday surprise last week. The day before Thanksgiving, Harvey Fierstein, currently appearing as Edna Turnblad in Broadway's...
Next: The Polypill Prescription
Byline: Jerry Adler Nick Wald's great brainstorm, which came to him a few years ago during his father-in-law's struggle with cardiovascular disease late in life, has the virtue of utter simplicity, and perhaps also its drawbacks. As Wald, a professor...
No Way to Make Friends: Bush Could Surely Have Arranged to Meet in Baghdad with Troops from Allied Countries Who Are Also Fighting and Dying in Iraq
Byline: Fareed Zakaria President Bush's Thanksgiving trip to Iraq was a generous and bold-hearted gesture of support to American troops. What made it such a success, however, was that it managed to severely limit an otherwise unavoidable aspect...
Perspectives
Byline: Quotation sources from top to bottom: Los Angeles Times, Ireland Online, Associated Press (2), The Hill, Associated Press, USA Today, Komo 1000, Reuters, BBC News "You want to hang me, OK, poke me, shock me." Suspected sniper Lee Boyd Malvo,...
Politics: What's in Howard Dean's Secret Vermont Files?
Byline: Michael Isikoff As investigative reporters and "oppo" researchers flock to Vermont to dig into Howard Dean's past, they have run into a roadblock. A large chunk of Dean's records as governor are locked in a remote state warehouse--the result...
Relief That May Be Too Risky: Hormones: About Nine Million Women Use Hormones, Down from 15 Million Last Year
Byline: Karen Springen and Barbara Kantrowitz For 15 years Sidney Constien of Malvern, Pa., took hormone therapy for symptoms of menopause. "I kept asking the doctor, 'How long do I have to take this?' He kept saying, 'How long do you want to live?'"...
Sweet on Keaton: In Her New Film, Diane Finally Gives Nicholson Some Age-Appropriate Love. Women Will Cheer. So Should Everybody
Byline: Sean Smith When the two-sentence synopsis of "Something's Gotta Give" started circulating around Hollywood last year, guys laughed when they heard it. (Here's how it goes: an older man who dates only younger women goes out to his new girlfriend's...
Technology: Cutting the (Phone) Cord
Byline: Brad Stone Brian Hoyt of Alexandria, Va., had to work hard to persuade his fiancee, Stephanie Thomas, to drop their home phone line when they moved in together over the summer. Why keep the land line, he asked, when a cable modem pipes broadband...
That's Why We Call It Junk Food: It's Not Just a Metaphor: Fats and Sweets May Be Addictive
Byline: Anne Underwood Few foods are more alluring than fine chocolate, with its seductive blend of complex sweetness and velvety texture--and few become the object of such ardent obsessions. "Chocolate is a drug of abuse in its own category," jokes...
The Bible's Lost Stories: Fueling Faith and Igniting Debate, a New Generation of Scholars Is Altering Our Beliefs about the Role of Women in the Scriptures
Byline: Barbara Kantrowitz and Anne Underwood The year's surprise "it" girl is the star of a mega best seller, a hot topic on campuses and rumored to be the "special friend" of a famous and powerful man. Yet she's still very much a woman of mystery....
The Editor's Desk
Byline: Mark Whitaker The reporters who worked on this week's cover story are a truly ecumenical team. Anne Underwood comes from a family that includes several Episcopal priests. Pat Wingert went to Catholic schools. Karen Springen was raised as...
The Litigation: Looking for Payback: Their Trust Betrayed, Investors Are Joining Class-Action Suits
Byline: Debra Rosenberg When Peter Kugi decided to set up a college fund for his young son six years ago, he chose a local Milwaukee firm, Strong Capital Management. The founder, Dick Strong, had "the reputation of the guy next door who would look...
The Marketing of Missy: The Electrifying Ms. Elliott Gets Commodified
Byline: Lorraine Ali and Jennifer Ordonez Ask any kid who watches BET, MTV or just TV, and you'll hear that Missy Elliott is at the top of her game. Over the past 10 years, the producer turned rapper has established herself as queen of the freshest...
The Mutual Fund Scandal: Unfair Fight: Mutual Funds Were Supposed to Be the Smart, Safe Choice for Small Investors. but the Latest Scandal Shows How Wall Street Big Shots Make Profits, While the Little Guys Take a Beating
Byline: Allan Sloan On Wall Street, there are big, well-connected fish. And then there are regular, little investors, who are the fish food. Exhibit A? The case of fund manager Gary Pilgrim, perhaps the most startling example of alleged abuse of...
The Right Stuffing: Stealing Away in the Dark, Bush Makes a Secret Trip to Iraq, Boosting Troop Morale and Confounding Cynics
Byline: Howard Fineman and Tamara Lipper Turkey and trimmings alone weren't enough of a draw, and neither, concluded the American brass in Baghdad, was the prospect of listening to a speech by Paul Bremer, head of the Coalition Provisional Authority....
To Save the Stricken Brain
Byline: Andrew Murr Just two weeks after giving birth to a daughter last November, Michelle Larwood suffered a major stroke. One moment, the Los Angeles woman, 38, sat calmly in a doctor's waiting room. The next, she recalls, "I couldn't speak,...
Unraveling the Secrets of the Cell: Five Decades after DNA Came to Light, We're Finally Learning How RNA Brings It to Life
Byline: Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D., and Gary Ruvkun, Ph.D. In 2003 we celebrated the 50th birthday of modern molecular biology. It was a half century ago that James Watson and Francis Crick discovered the structure of DNA--the stuff that genes are...
Weighing the Medical Evidence: How Can We Lose Weight? Protect Our Hearts? Control Blood Pressure? Docs Are Divided
Byline: Anthony L. Komaroff, M.D., Frank M. Sacks, M.D., Richard C. Pasternak, M.D., Thomas H. Lee, M.D., James S. Winshall, M.D., Robert C. Goldszer, M.D. Science is the foundation of good medicine, but it rarely offers complete or perfect answers....
When the Body Attacks Itself
Byline: Anne Underwood The immune system is a thing of beauty--subtle enough to distinguish dangerous invaders like viruses from benign interlopers such as food; clever enough to recognize when the body's supposedly friendly cells turn cancerous...
'Wrap These Guys Up': As an Occupier, General Petraeus Did Everything Right. Then a Lot Went Wrong
Byline: Christian Caryl and John Barry No U.S. commander in Iraq has done a smarter job than Maj. Gen. David Petraeus. Practically every military observer agrees: in the seven months since his troops took charge in the northern city of Mosul, the...