Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from Vol. 132, No. 25, December 21

A Champagne Toast: There's Bucks in Those Bubbles
Looking into a glass of champagne these days, Joy Sterling sees something more than bubbles. She sees bucks. As owner of Iron Horse Vineyards, a California maker of fine wines, both sparkling and still, Sterling is counting the fewer-than-400 days...
A Crisis at Home
The Clintons are in the fight of their lives--to save his troubled presidency, their shared legacy and their own self-respect. They stood side by side, smiles affixed, man and wife atop the wedding cake of public life. It was Christmas season in...
A Persian Love Machine
Madonna, Demi, Goldie and Deepak are mad for Rumi--the hottest dead Sufi poet in Hollywood Move over, brad and leo. the newest love machine is a 13th-century Persian mystic poet named Jalal al-Din Mohammad Balkhi--or Rumi for short. A mere 700 years...
Censure, and Move On
Take a close look at the charges against the presi-dent: Republicans haven't proved abuse of power, only that President Clinton acted like a lawyer by pushing every legal argument (no matter how flimsy) and lied to his staff. They haven't proved obstruction...
Clinton Is No Jimmy Carter
And there's no Begin or Sadat. The ex-president's biographer explains what happened to the can-do spirit of Camp David. If bill clinton had flown with me to tel aviv on el Al, Israel's national airline, instead of on Air Force One, he would have...
Defeat at Pork Chop Hill: Hog Farming Had Long Been a Solid, Silk-Purse Business, until This Autumn's Price Collapse
Every week a tractor-trailer lurches away from the Hankes family's 700-acre farm near Fairbury, Ill., filled with pigs. The truck's cargo may be odoriferous, but it has a proud tradition as one of the most dependable commodities in the farm belt. And...
Hey! We Wuz Robbed!
Blown NFL calls may bring back instant replay--but who said sports was fair? We've made the call. a deeply divided nation has responded as one to the sorry state of NFL officiating. With football officials having blown a succession of key calls...
Impeach, and Convict
Last week, the president's lawyers defended their man before the House Judiciary Committee. Or did they? Bill Clinton's team spent an awful lot of time acknowledging that his deeds are indefensible. Just look at the censure resolution proposed by Democrats...
In Prime Time, and in Play: Garth Ancier Leaves the WB-For a Job at NBC?
When Garth Ancier stepped aside last week as head of programming at the WB, he couldn't say what his next job might be. Then again, he didn't have to. Industry insiders immediately insisted that the 41-year-old exec was leaving the network he helped...
Letters
Eating Well for Life I applaud your Nov. 30 cover story on the benefits of eating healthier foods ("Cancer & Diet," society). The picture comparing a low-risk dinner with a high-risk dinner could have easily been taken at my house. It reminded...
Listening to Our Readers: The Year in Mail
Each week a thousand Letters to the Editor pour into our office via e-mail, fax and U.S. Postal Service from readers wanting to share their views about stories that have appeared in Newsweek. Sometimes we can predict which articles will score high...
Love Just Wasn't in Their Stars
Sexual-harassment charges on a cruise ship It was the kind of offer you might expect from the skipper of a luxury liner like Crystal Harmony: "Would you like to see the Northern Lights?" Two years ago Patricia DeLuca, a lowly, middle-aged employee...
'Palestinian Go Home': With His Trip to Gaza, Clinton Jumps from the Frying Pan into the Fire
Even Houdini, Bill Clinton's alter ego, never pulled off a show like this. Back in Washington, impeachment dangled over the president's head. In Israel, angry right-wingers had put up posters depicting him in an Arafat-like kaffiyeh above the words,...
Perspectives
"I understand that accountability demands consequences, and I'm prepared to accept them." President Clinton, in his latest public apology, delivered Friday afternoon in the Rose Garden "Life was so much simpler before they found that dress, wasn't...
Race, Respect and the NBA
Conflicts over money and control have kept the lockout going. But there's been another X-factor: the divide between white owners and black players. At Magic Johnson's annual Christmas bash last week in Los Angeles, the mood couldn't have been more...
Risky Bidness: You Can Get Anything You Want on the Auction Site eBay. but Proceed with Caution
Almost faster than you can say "Sold!" the Internet auction host eBay has gone from a Web site designed to move Pez dispensers to a retailing giant valued at more than $7 billion (that's more than Kmart). Its founder is a billionaire, its customers...
Saving the Seahorses: Overfishing Is Threatening the Unusual Creatures
Gregorio Dano is a seahorse fisherman, and he's not happy. A decade ago, he and the other subsistence fishers from the central Philippine village of Handumon supported their families by collecting dozens of seahorses a day from the coral reefs of nearby...
Seasonal Litigation
Is a religious sensibility natural to humanity, or is religion akin to secondhand smoke? For many people, 'tis the season when (in the words of the Jesuit poet Gerard Manley Hopkins) "the world is charged with the grandeur of God." For the American...
Solving a Monet Mystery: A $17 Million Insurance Scam in Brentwood?
For years, Steven G. Cooperman was a fairly typical eye doctor--for Beverly Hills. He ran a high-flying practice in the city's medical "Golden Triangle." Comedian Red Skelton flacked for it on TV, while the pleasant and solicitous doctor sent limousines...
Something about Frank
The FBI's Sinatra files are voluminous, but did you hear the one about the hooker? Read on. How could he have fooled a whole nation for so long? How could Americans have heaped all those honors and awards on Frank Sinatra, flocked by the millions...
The Final Days and Nights of a Gay Martyr
Lonely and depressed, Matthew Shepard feared someone would kill him Tom (DOC) O'Connor vividly remembers the first time he met Matthew Shepard. It was Friday, Oct. 2, and Shepard wanted a limo to take him down to Ft. Collins, Colo., for a night...
The Guessing Game: A Seasoned Operator Handicaps the Vote-And the Punishment
In august 1993, i sat be-side President Clinton as we worked the phones on the president's first big test in Congress, a massive budget-cutting bill. We were eight votes behind with just a few hours to go before the House members cast their votes....
The New Giving Games
Salespeople are marketing the charity loophole--but some plans verge on tax abuse Money isn't everything, but it sure keeps you in touch with your kids. It also keeps you in touch with financial planners, who'll be quick to suggest that you're building...
The Perils of Geek Speak
The jargon at the antitrust trial is confounding the audience--and often the judge and the lawyers Sometimes the language in the government's epic antitrust case against Microsoft, now entering its ninth week and 10th witness, might as well be Klingon....
The Politics of Statehood
Arafat has made a country imaginable, but his turf is tiny. The threat to declare independence is a tactic. Most palestinians are convinced that they are on the road to statehood. And lately their leader has been saying that the day may come sooner,...
Tough Guy Talking
In 'The Thin Red Line' and 'Hurlyburly,' Sean Penn makes brutal roles look easy. Just don't ask him how he does it. Sean penn really knows how to kill a conversation. Ask him about his new film, "The Thin Red Line," the first movie in nearly 20...
When Is a Tree Not a Tree? ... When You're Jewish and Your Husband Wants a Christmas Tree in Your Living Room
Our argument always centers on the height of the tree. I want a small one, no taller than a kitchen chair or a stuffed panda. My husband wants one towering, bursting. Usually he indulges me. But last December he came back from our local Greenmarket...