Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from December 25

36 Days: The Fallout: The Toll It Took: The Election Frayed the Courts, the Press and the Process, Argues NEWSWEEK's Columnist, but the Rule of Law Still Prevailed
In the flurry of post-election Internet jokes and missives in recent weeks, this one stands out. The authenticity of the author, "an unidentified Zimbabwe politician," could not be confirmed. He could be real--or someone's concoction. In any event,...
Al Eyes the Future: Gore's Next Act: Whatever He Does, from Author to Scholar, He Won't Close the Door to a New Run for the Job He Really Wants
Few things in politics engage Al Gore like writing a major speech. His concession was no different--he fiddled and fussed over every word, and despite official insistence to the contrary, he had been giving considerable thought to his exit. Two weeks...
All for One, One for AOL: After Months of Wrangling with Regulators, the Biggest Merger in History Received Government Approval. Can They Make It Work?
Last summer, months before the Federal Trade Commission approved America Online's $110 billion merger with Time Warner, a new arrival at the Manhattan headquarters of the world's largest media and entertainment company had executives there buzzing....
Boy, Did We Know Ye: So Long, Bill: Say This for Clinton-He Was Never Boring. Firsthand Recollections of the Topsy-Turvy Era from People on the Inside
Bill Clinton came to Washington in 1993 with an uncertain mandate--and emerges, eight years later, as the consummate survivor, a gifted politician popular on substance but tarnished by self-inflicted personal mistakes that led to the first impeachment...
Bush V. Gore May Be Just the Beginning: The Next Big Question Will Be Whether W Can Tilt the High Court to the Right
Long after George W. Bush takes office, the 2000 election will continue to cast a shadow over the Supreme Court. Democrats are seething at what they consider a blatantly political, conservative activist decision by five Republican-appointed justices...
Changing the Channels: Katie and Matt Love Him Already. Now, 'Today's' Power Producer Takes on Prime Time
Jeff Zucker knows stress. This is the guy, after all, who for a six-week stretch in 1993 produced both NBC's "Today'' show and "Nightly News.'' But this fall takes the prize: NBC added a third hour to "Today,'' he oversaw the show's Olympics coverage...
Finally, the Net Gets Real: Think of It as Revolution 2.0. While the First Wave of Dot-Coms Crashed and Burned, Old Economy Giants Quietly Retooled Their Businesses around the Huge Promise of the Internet
Patrick Ahrendt came to Silicon Valley seeking the dot-com gold miner's dream. The 31-year-old marketer and his wife left their home in southern California and moved to the only house they could afford, in a dusty farming community called Turlock,...
Hillary's Whole New Book: With a Senate Seat, a Big-Bucks Deal for Her Memoirs and Talk about Her Own White House Bid, Hillary May Just Be Getting Started
Hillary Clinton was in her element. On stage at Belfast's ornate Grand Opera House last week, flanked by volunteers and politicians' wives, Clinton celebrated the role of women in the Northern Ireland peace process. In a confident speech reminiscent...
Investing, after the Bubble Making It Back: Reclaiming a Financial Life after Your Net Stocks Laughed and Ran Away
It's over, like a bad romance. your mother told you dot-coms were no good and would let you down hard, but you didn't believe her. Now you're singing the blues, with your beloved Yahoo, Priceline and iVillage down 85 percent or more in price. Will...
Jack Welch Goes Surfing: Nearing Retirement, GE's Chief Has Become a Net Evangelist. His Homily: The Web Is Best Used to Rewire Old Companies, Not Start New Ones
General Electric chairman Jack Welch doesn't have a little black book. Instead, he keeps two enormous black binders--GE's operating manual, filled with reams of minutiae about company operations--on his credenza. And when Welch talks about the Internet,...
Leader of the Pack: The General Was First-A Genuine 'American Hero,' Colin Powell Is Going to State. His Role, and the Rest of the New Team
Stories that people tell about Colin Powell always seem to have the same ending. Like the time in 1972 when Powell, then a newly minted major in the Army, was trying out for a prestigious White House fellowship. The final shortlist had 33 candidates,...
Lessons for the Age of 24/7: As the Press Sifts through the Rubble, I Think the Oldest Truth Still Applies: Get It First, but Get It Right. Remembering a Wild Ride
After covering presidential politics for more than 30 years, I have come to rely on what I call the UFO Theory: the unforeseen will occur. It's a reliable dodge when I am pressed for a prediction. This year the UFO Theory hit critical mass on election...
Let It Show, Let It Show: The Next Ballots to Be Counted Are for the Oscars. but First, Here Come the Holiday Movies
It was a strange year at the movies. Seventeen films so far have broken the $100 million mark at the box office, but it was hard to find anyone who really liked them. There were plenty of good movies--but only a few came from the big Hollywood studios....
Periscope
Newsweek: U.S. Edition - December 25, 2000 Page 6 PERISCOPE WHITE HOUSE From Sublime to Subliminable #1: Win Office #2: Redecorate George W. Bush pledged to restore "honor and dignity" to the White House. Poppy's desk may come back first....
Perspectives
POLITICS "Americans share hopes and goals and values far more important than any political disagreements. Republicans want the best for our nation. And so do Democrats. Our votes may differ, but not our hopes." George W. Bush, in his first speech as...
Reality TV's Real Survivor: You Thought the Darva and Rick Show Was the Big TV Disaster of the Year? Think Again
For years, Mike Darnell had his tombstone all planned. "I used to say I'd put: however he died, I hope he caught it on tape," Darnell says. "I don't think that anymore." Perhaps that's because this year he got a good look at what death might, professionally...
Surviving the Coming Clash: With the Left Feeling Frisky, Conservatives Need to Watch Their Step If They Want to Have Their Way. It's Time to Be Patient
My fellow conservatives: You know those Democrats who tried to take the election away from George W. Bush? Well, now we're married to them. President W is going to take control of the White House having won fewer votes than the guy he beat. The Republicans...
The Dearly Departed: They Helped Shape the 20th Century-And Caught a Glimpse of the 21st
STEVE ALLEN b. Dec. 26, 1921 The showbiz Leonardo da Vinci, Allen composed thousands of songs (including "This Could Be the Start of Something Big"), played Benny Goodman on film, wrote books and campaigned against sex and violence on TV. But...
The Test of His Life: President Bush: He's Headed for the White House, but Now He'll Have to Transcend the Carnage of Winning. How the Rules of Texas and B School Will Play in D.C
Al Gore's aides had passed the word to Austin earlier in the day: The Call would come that night at 7:45 Texas time--precisely 15 minutes before the vice president's concession speech. George W. Bush planned his evening accordingly. For the last meal...
The Truth Behind the Pillars: The Final Act: They Cultivate an Olympian Air, but the Justices Are Quite Human-And Can Be Quite Political
Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor and her husband, John, a Washington lawyer, have long been comfortable on the cocktail and charity-ball circuit. So at an election-night party on Nov. 7, surrounded for the most part by friends and familiar...
'Time Heals a Lot of Wounds': The Ex-President on His Son, His Own Role and W's Tough Job Ahead
In the first days of the Overtime Election, former president George Bush kept up with the mess in Florida by juggling borrowed cell phones on a hunting trip with King Juan Carlos of Spain. When Bush checked in to the Mayo Clinic for a hip replacement...
Y2k: You Must Remember This: Herewith a Recounting-So to Speak-Of the Most Interesting Year of the Millennium, So Far
The Florida peninsula, the last part of the continental United States to emerge from the ocean, has been called a geological afterthought. This year caused many Americans to curse geology and wish that the afterthought had gone unthought. A wit says...
Year of Living Strangely Edition
CONVENTIONAL WISDOM WATCH Year of Living Strangely Edition The year started out with a whimper (what Y2K bomb?), and then came the Cuban 6-year-old saved by a fisherman who really wasn't, a political campaign that put everyone to sleep, a television...