Newsweek

Newsweek is a weekly news magazine covering current events and politics in America. Newsweek magazine is published by Newsweek, Inc. and is headquartered in New York, N.Y. It has been published since 1933 and is currently owned by Sidney Harman. Newsweek covers national news and is the second largest weekly news magazine in the United States, behind Time Magazine. Newsweek was founded in 1933 as News-Week by Thomas J.C. Martyn, a former foreign Time magazine editor. At that time, the magazine cost 10 cents a copy and $4 per year. The name changed to Newsweek in 1937 and it merged with Raymond Moley's weekly magazine, Today. Moley was a member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's "Brain Trust" and to distinguish itself from its competition, Time, which had a similar format, Newsweek carved a reputation for itself as being more liberal and serious in tone. It was the first to assign writer by-lines for its editorial columns. The Washington Post Company bought the magazine in 1961 and its liberal publisher, Katharine Graham, continued to set the publication apart from its two main competitors (Time and U.S. News & World Report). Starting in 2008, the company went through massive restructuring and suffered a reported 50 percent in subscriber rate loss in one year and $28 million in revenue in 2009. The magazine was sold to stereo pioneer Sidney Harman, who is husband to California Congresswoman Jane Harman, in August 2010. Newsweek's editor Jon Meacham's resignation from the magazine coincided with the sale. 52 percent of the readership are men and 47 percent are women. The average age of readers is 52 and 88 percent have either attended or graduated from college. The average personal income of its readers is $99,792.In the 1950s, Newsweek became a leader in in-depth reporting of racial diversity and in the 1960s, under then-editor Osborn Elliott, it became a voice for advocacy journalism, where subjective political positions are countebalanced with facts. In August 1976, Newsweek reported that federal investigators had enough evidence to prove that former Teamsters Union boss James Hoffa was strangled to death July 30, 1974, the day he disappeared outside a suburban Detroit restaurant. The article further reported that the murder was planned and executed outside Michigan. In 1998, Newsweek killed a story about White House intern Monica Lewinsky's sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. The story broke on news aggregate website, the Drudge Report, which reported that Newsweek's reporter, Michael Isikoff, had gathered enough evidence from sources to publish the story and name Lewinsky, when at the last minute the magazine decided to pull it. Newsweek eventually published the story after the Drudge Report made it public. The magazine is reknowned for its investigative war reporting, most recently in Iraq and Afghanistan. Daniel Klaidman is the Managing Editor.

Articles from May 7

After the First Hundred Days. If Bush Wants to Leave a Legacy, He's Got to Move beyond Tax Cuts and Moral Values
The first politician to get something done in 100 days was Napoleon. In 1815 he escaped from Elba, rallied an army, took Paris, tried to reconquer Europe and fought the Battle of Waterloo--all in exactly 100 days. By that yardstick, George W. Bush's...
A New Pacific Strategy: Washington Is Evolving a Deterrence Theory for China
When Disney Productions descended on Hawaii last year to film its forthcoming movie about Pearl Harbor, director Michael Bay was ecstatic at the condition of the U.S. naval base there. "Admiral, this is great," he said to the commander of U.S. forces...
A Shrek of a Summer: FAMILY FARE: A Smart, Wild, Irreverent Summer Movie? Sounds like a Fairy Tale
Typically, the summers are hot and the movies are not. This year, though, Hollywood is giving even cynics reason to believe. A World War II epic. An audacious musical. A delightful, demented fairy tale. And, if you ever liked any movie at all, you're...
Bush's 'Power Puff Girls': The New Team Boasts a Record Number of Top Female Aides
Ari Fleischer needed answers, and he knew where to go. Early this spring, when the Bush administration quietly closed the Office for Women's Initiatives and Outreach, the White House press secretary was swamped with questions from reporters. Was the...
Coming to Terms with a Tragedy: Three Decades Ago, on a Dark Night in Vietnam, Bob Kerrey and His Squad of SEALs Killed Unarmed Civilians in the Village of Thanh Phong. the Chilling Story of a Memory That Would Not Die, and Its Complicated Journey to Public Light
Sen. Bob Kerrey, Vietnam War hero, Medal of Honor winner, often came across as a brooding figure. His friends attributed Kerrey's melancholy streak to his long suffering in a veterans' hospital after part of his leg was blown off by a Viet Cong grenade...
Cyberscope
HOT PROPERTY Knock Jar Jar Out of the Race The "Star Wars" movies all focus on an epic, life-and-death struggle between good and evil. But in Star Wars Super Bombad Racing for the PlayStation 2 ($50; LucasArts, 888-532-4263), familiar foes like...
Duty? Maybe It's Really Self-Help. If Being a Juror Is So Bad, Why Do So Many of the People Who Serve Feel So Good Afterward?
This courtroom has a disconcerting decorative duality, like a person dressed only from the waist down. The lower half of the cavernous room has glowing wood wainscoting, and the well is set off by a surround of ornamental spindles. But above, the walls...
Faith Is More Than A Feeling: The Problem with Neurotheology Is That It Confuses Spiritual Experiences- Which Few Believers Actually Have-With Religion
Skeptics used to argue that anyone with half a brain should realize there is no God. Now scientists are telling us that one half of the brain, or a portion thereof, is "wired" for religious experiences. But whether this evolving "neurotheology" is...
First Brush with History: He's Been Humble, but Kind of Cocky; Quiet, but Surprisingly Effective-In Short, Lazy like a Fox. Inside George W. Bush's First 100 Days
It was week one of President George W. Bush's first foreign-policy crisis. The cable-TV news networks were blaring on about "the showdown with China." Talking heads were asking when the 24 American crew members "detained" on Hainan Island were going...
Focus on Your Money
MUTUAL FUNDS Stock-Fund Seepage... Investors pulled $12 billion out of stock funds in February and March, according to data compiled by AMG Data Services and the Investment Company Institute. The two-month exodus represented the biggest withdrawal...
Indifferent to Inequality? Americans Care Less about the Gap between the Rich and the Poor Than about Just Getting Ahead
At last count, I was trailing way behind Bill Gates in life's wealth derby. His paycheck is bigger, he owns more stock and he lives in a bigger house. None of this bothers me. When Gates's wealth rises, it doesn't make me feel worse; when it falls,...
Is It Safe to Get Married? When a Beloved Owes Child Support, New Spouses Worry That They, Too, Might Have to Pay
Q: My fiance will be paying child-support bills for the next 12 years. If I marry him, can his ex lay claim to my income, as part of his household income? I love the man and his children dearly, but do not want to assume any financial responsibility...
Newsmakers
Deja Vu All Over Again Robert Downey Jr. used to have a recurring role on "Ally McBeal." Now his only command performance is in the California court system. The troubled thespian was picked up by cops outside a seedy, $45-a-night Culver City motel...
New World Pyramids: Scientists Have Unearthed the Oldest Known City in the Americas, Showing That Urban Civilization Began Here 1,500 Years Earlier Than They Thought
They trekked for half a mile, stuffing some 70 pounds of stones collected from the riverbed and surrounding hillsides into open-weave bags made of reeds. Returning to the terrace 80 feet above the river valley, the workers set the rocks, bags and all,...
Oops, They Did It Again: SECOND COMINGS: Making Part Two Can Be an Expensive Nightmare, but Summer 2001 Is Silly with Sequels
In the real world, familiarity breeds contempt. Not in Hollywood. It sells tickets. From now through August, the major studios will release no fewer than seven sequels. One studio, Universal Pictures, has three follow-ups on its summer slate: "The...
Periscope
ENERGY Mixing Oil and (Clean) Water As veterans of the oil bidness, George W. Bush and Dick Cheney want to prove that solar-panel-brandishing greens haven't cornered the market on high-tech solutions to energy problems. The vice president's still-secret...
Perspectives
"Probably wearing a red tie too many times."President George W. Bush, reflecting on his biggest mistake during the first hundred days "I am not a potential commander in chief." Former senator Bob Kerrey, in the midst of controversy about his role...
Religion and the Brain: In the New Field of "Neurotheology," Scientists Seek the Biological Basis of Sprituality. Is God All in Our Heads?
One Sunday morning in March, 19 years ago, as Dr. James Austin waited for a train in London, he glanced away from the tracks toward the river Thames. The neurologist--who was spending a sabbatical year in England--saw nothing out of the ordinary: the...
Ten Reasons to Stay Inside: PREVIEWS: An Entire Summer without Cruise, Carrey or Gladiators? We're Terribly Vexed! Fortunately, There Are Still Plenty of Movies We're Itching to See
A KNIGHT'S TALE Watch closely during the jousting scenes in Sony's medieval fantasy starring Heath Ledger, and you'll notice something odd amid all that wood from the shattering lances. "Linguine," says writer-director Brian Helgeland. "It looked...
The Claim Game: So You Think You Got Burned by Your Broker. Is There Anything You Can Do to Get Your Money Back? A Look at Legal Options for the Aggrieved Investor
Ernie Petko was trying to stretch his 88-year-old mother's money. She had suffered a stroke and he wanted to make sure she could continue to afford a private nurse in her own home. So when her CDs came due, he asked his bank for advice. The broker...
The Terrible Wages of War: The Search for Answers in Bob Kerrey's Past Points Up the Moral Ambiguities of Vietnam
It was early 1992, and I was covering Bob Kerrey's presidential campaign in New Hampshire. At a local high school, someone passed me a fax of a breaking news story about Gov. Bill Clinton's letter thanking a colonel for "saving me from the draft."...
'They Are Killing Us!': A Peruvian Fighter Jet Mistakenly Shoots Down U.S. Missionaries, Raising New Questions about the Drug War. an Inside Story of One Family's Devastating Loss
For Jim and Roni Bowers, the plane ride high above the Amazon River was a welcome respite from their rewarding but rigorous life as missionaries. They'd gone to the border town of Leticia, Colombia, with their 6-year-old son, Cory, to get a Peruvian...
This Space Available: On 'The Runner,' ABC's Upcoming Reality TV Show, Advertisers Can Shape the Plot-For the Right Price
"The Runner" seems to fit the times. In the new ABC reality show, hidden cameras follow a "runner" (though the whole trip isn't made on foot) as he or she travels across America. While viewers try to track the runner down, he or she must accomplish...
What the World Didn't Know about Me: In the 1996 Olympics, I Chose Depression over Meds That Threatened My Chance for a Gold Medal
I was in what many people call "the rich man's playground," Monaco: the small country on the Mediterranean where France meets Italy. As I sat on my hotel balcony watching the yachts pull in to dock, I tried my best to put my life in perspective. My...